Search results

1 – 10 of over 18000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 5 March 2020

Edward C.S. Ku, Shun-Fa Hsu and Wu-Chung Wu

The goal of this study is to investigate how the development efficiency of restaurant companies' products of their suppliers, supplier–supplier connection, design quality…

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of this study is to investigate how the development efficiency of restaurant companies' products of their suppliers, supplier–supplier connection, design quality and adaptation affect the supply chain performance (SCP) of restaurant companies.

Design/methodology/approach

We use the stratified random-sampling method for this study. We mailed the research questionnaire to the managers in the cases where they could be identified; a total of 1,063 questionnaires were sent by mail and a useable response of 156 fully completed questionnaires was received.

Findings

When the supplier has good development efficiency of restaurant companies' products, they can comply with the requirements of the budget project, and then, finally adapt to the restaurant companies to strengthen mutual relations of coexistence; suppliers with a good connection can make restaurant companies willing to go along with them.

Research limitations/implications

The limitation of this study was that the different types of suppliers were not compared, and some restaurants without scaled operations may have different effects on the result.

Practical implications

The supplier–supplier connection is established when the suppliers or companies have generated important decisions. The suppliers will cope with the restaurant companies to make the delivery procedure more unhindered and invest in highly specialized equipment in the relationship and finally, improve the SCP.

Originality/value

This study focuses on the restaurant companies in partnership: how to cooperate with the suppliers to make good supply efficiency, and thus enhance the SCP of the restaurant companies. Overall, the results of the study have provided reliable instruments for operationalizing the key effect constructs in the analysis of operational performance.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Norman Peng and Annie Huiling Chen

Consumers dine at luxury restaurants for reasons beyond fulfilling basic needs; however, little is known about the factors that contribute to diners’ loyalty. The purpose…

Downloads
2778

Abstract

Purpose

Consumers dine at luxury restaurants for reasons beyond fulfilling basic needs; however, little is known about the factors that contribute to diners’ loyalty. The purpose of this paper is to examine diners’ luxury restaurant consumption behavior by incorporating product knowledge into a modified Mehrabian-Russell model.

Design/methodology/approach

Following exploratory qualitative research, 238 consumers who have dined at Hong Kong’s Michelin-starred luxury restaurants were recruited for the main study. The data were analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

The results show that luxury restaurants’ stimuli (i.e. food quality, service quality, and atmospherics) influence diners’ emotions, which in turn affect their brand loyalty. Furthermore, food quality can directly influence diners’ loyalty toward the restaurant. Third, diners’ product knowledge can moderate the relationships between restaurant stimuli and diners’ emotion.

Research limitations/implications

This study offers new empirical support for the proposition that product knowledge has a role in building brand loyalty and thereby shades both theoretical and managerial understanding of the luxury restaurant consumption process.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first to conceptualize diners’ loyalty toward luxury restaurants by examining the influences of restaurants’ stimuli and diners’ knowledge toward luxury restaurants. In addition, this study puts forth some managerial implications for practitioners.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 14 November 2019

Heesup Han, Hyoungeun Moon and Sunghyup Sean Hyun

This paper aims to uncover the determining factors of customers’ pro-environmental intention for green hospitality products (green hotels and green restaurants) and…

Downloads
1009

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to uncover the determining factors of customers’ pro-environmental intention for green hospitality products (green hotels and green restaurants) and explore the comparative importance among the factors. This study also investigated the difference in forming pro-environmental intention across the green hospitality product types.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-method approach was taken to achieve the research objectives. In a qualitative phase, the textual data collected via an open-ended question were analyzed using a unit of analysis and categorization method. In a quantitative phase, the psychometric measurement items were organized and validated through a series of tests. A structural equation modeling and structural invariance test were used to evaluate the hypothesized relationships and difference between green hotels and green restaurants.

Findings

The textual data yielded three additional factors underlying consumers’ pro-environmental consumption intention. Including five core variables derived from the extant theories in the pro-environmental behavior literature, eight variables were categorized into volitional, cognitive, emotional and moral dimensions. Among the dimensions, volitional and cognitive dimensions significantly contributed to consumer’ pro-environmental intention. The influence of pro-environmental attitude and perceived benefits on intention differed across green hotels and green restaurants.

Originality/value

This study uses a thorough mixed-method approach encompassing qualitative and quantitative processes and develops the psychometric items to explore the drivers of customers’ pro-environmental consumption intention for green hospitality products. This research is also one of the very few studies that verified the difference in customers’ pro-environmental behavior between green hotels and green restaurants.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 19 March 2018

Meehee Cho, Mark A. Bonn, Su Jin Han and Sora Kang

The purpose of this study is to better understand the effects of independent restaurant partnerships upon product innovation associated with performance by investigating…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to better understand the effects of independent restaurant partnerships upon product innovation associated with performance by investigating differences in business situations between startup and established independent restaurant sectors.

Design/methodology/approach

Partnership strength and diversity were assessed to identify their influence on restaurant product innovation and performance using a structural equation model to test the study’s hypotheses. A multi-group analysis was used to examine the moderating roles of business life cycle on the relationships between partnership strength and diversity and product innovation.

Findings

Results found that product innovation implementation requires strong and diverse partnerships with suppliers to improve independent restaurant performance. Diverse partnerships have a more positive effect upon product innovation than do strong partnerships. The positive effect partnership strength with suppliers had upon product innovation was significantly greater for startup restaurants, while its positive effect of diversity was greater for established restaurants.

Practical implications

Findings can be used to establish effective strategic partnerships with independent restaurant suppliers and to manage them more effectively in consideration of their business characteristics being startup or established operations.

Originality/value

This study was an initial attempt to empirically prove significant roles of partnership strength and diversity applied to the context of independent restaurant product innovation. Findings regarding different effects of partnership strength and diversity contributed to the existing body of knowledge about strategic partnerships with suppliers.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 26 May 2020

Norman Peng

Some luxury restaurants might be hesitant to adopt new environmentally friendly initiatives due to worries that consumers might have concerns about how these changes might…

Abstract

Purpose

Some luxury restaurants might be hesitant to adopt new environmentally friendly initiatives due to worries that consumers might have concerns about how these changes might affect them. The purpose of this study is to investigate consumers’ intentions to dine at luxury restaurants when new environmentally friendly practices are implemented, considering the influence of trust and perceived risks.

Design/methodology/approach

Building on information integration theory and protection motivation theory, this research proposes its model and hypotheses. To test the proposed hypotheses, 441 participants were recruited through a non-probability purposive sampling method.

Findings

The results show that perceived risks (i.e. perceived functional risk, perceived financial risk, perceived hedonic risk and perceived self-image risk) significantly affect consumers’ consumption intentions. Furthermore, consumers’ trust in luxury restaurants will partially moderate the effects of perceived risks on consumption intentions.

Practical implications

This study offers empirical support for the proposition that implementing new environmentally friendly practices can affect consumers’ dining intentions in a negative way. Suggestions on how to mitigate the effect of perceived risks are discussed.

Originality/value

The results of this research contribute to the hospitality literature in three ways. First, this study is one of the few to report that luxury restaurants should take consumers’ perceptions of risk into account before initiating new environmentally friendly procedures. Second, it confirms that perceived risks will lower consumers’ luxury restaurant consumption intentions. Third, consumers’ trust in luxury restaurants can partially moderate the influences of perceived risks on consumption intentions.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 32 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 7 August 2017

Gabriele Scozzafava, Caterina Contini, Caterina Romano and Leonardo Casini

The purpose of this paper is to answer the following research questions: which are the main drivers in the choice of a restaurant for Italian consumers? Are local, organic…

Downloads
1745

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to answer the following research questions: which are the main drivers in the choice of a restaurant for Italian consumers? Are local, organic and GMO-free foods important attributes in the choice of a restaurant?

Design/methodology/approach

In order to answer the research questions, a discrete choice experiment was applied. In particular, the authors opted for the application of a latent class model to identify any differences in the behavioural structures of the various consumers. This approach is, in fact, based on the assumption that the choices of the subjects depend on observable and unobservable heterogeneity that vary with factors not directly detectable.

Findings

People show different preferences when they choose a restaurant. Regarding the choice experiment, the analysis of the importance of the attributes for the final choice highlights how price and service quality are always considered as the most important ones. The presence of menu with local foods, organic foods and OGM-free products is never decisive for the final choice but it is a very appreciated attribute for almost 30 per cent of consumers. This group of consumers (named local oriented) show a willingness to pay (WTP) of 11 euro for local foods, eight euro for organic products and 3.5 euro for OGM-free ingredients. For the locavores, the likelihood of choosing a restaurant offering local products is three times higher than that of a restaurant not possessing this type of certification, all other conditions being equal.

Research limitations/implications

Restaurant owners can differentiate their offerings also considering the local foods and organic products. On the other hand, the restaurants can become powerful marketing channels for local producers. The consumption of organic foods can be increased given the wide WTP displayed. This could positively impact in the promotion of healthier and sustainable diet.

Practical implications

The conditions therefore exist for developing a restaurant offer consisting of a basic menu with local foods, capable of integrating in a virtuous manner with the organic farm productions, which keep an eye on sustainable development and the wholesomeness of foods. If this virtuous process takes root in the restaurant sector, it could certainly represent an important opportunity for the agricultural producers as well, especially in the tourist areas. In order for this opportunity to materially be implemented in a development process, it is, however, necessary to develop certifications and brands capable of constituting credible guarantees for the consumer, as well as strengthening the information and communication campaigns among the younger consumers.

Social implications

The development of a segment of restaurants that support local foods and organic products would have positive impacts both from the social and territorial point of view.

Originality/value

This is the first paper that considers and evaluate the impact of local foods, organic foods and GMO-free foods in the choice of a restaurant. Findings demonstrate how the probability of choosing restaurants that offer local products, compared to the other conditions, is always higher than those focussing on organic or GMO-free products. The choice probability of the restaurant with local products is three times greater than that of a restaurant without local products, all other variables being equal.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 119 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 10 July 2009

Michael C. Ottenbacher and Robert J. Harrington

This paper aims to outline the innovation process activities described by quick‐service restaurant (QSR) managers and to compare it with an earlier QSR process model and…

Downloads
11832

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to outline the innovation process activities described by quick‐service restaurant (QSR) managers and to compare it with an earlier QSR process model and with those used in other food service settings.

Design/methodology/approach

Six semi‐structured interviews with QSR chain executives in the USA were conducted to better understand the underlying factors and dimensions that describe successful innovation process practices.

Findings

For new QSR menu innovations, the development teams follow a structured approach to reduce the likelihood of failure due to issues such as poor consumer demand or implementation. QSR screen new food innovations approximately five times during the development process. Furthermore, today's QSR innovation process integrates more sophisticated market research technology and a post‐audit is carried out after the new food concept has been launched. In comparison with studies of Michelin‐starred chefs QSR development teams use an approach that is much more explicitly structured as a whole due to the larger scale roll‐out as well as greater cross‐functional and regional differences to consider in the QSR setting.

Research limitations/implications

The study was conducted in only one country and on a small sample. Based on an analysis of the findings, the innovation development process of QSR can be broken down into 13 main steps. Compared with earlier hospitality innovation studies, the process in this setting includes multiple screenings for high‐risk innovations, and greater emphasis on operational and training issues.

Originality/value

The study expands the scope of hospitality innovation research and the findings have important implications not only for QSR settings but also for other restaurant segments, and for other hospitality service endeavours.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Amel Ben Hadj Salem‐Mhamdia and Bahia Bejar Ghadhab

The purpose of this study is to show how using value management (VM) together with activity based costing (ABC) for menu analysis helps managers to estimate contribution…

Downloads
4220

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to show how using value management (VM) together with activity based costing (ABC) for menu analysis helps managers to estimate contribution margins more precisely and to analyze customer satisfaction. This new approach is considered an appropriate tool for guiding and directing the process of making decisions.

Design/methodology/approach

In this research a case study is employed to examine whether the application of the ABC/VM approach can improve the decision‐making process in a Tunisian à la carte restaurant. Data were collected over the period of a month using direct observations of restaurant activities to calculate profitability, and a questionnaire was administered to determine customer satisfaction.

Findings

The results show that six of 11 menu items were profitable. The results also show that managers should analyze profitability and customer point of view simultaneously in order to inform the decision‐making process.

Research limitations/implications

Only a single à la carte‐style restaurant and the dinner menu was examined in this study. Future research should apply the model to other restaurant types in order to validate the model.

Practical implications

The paper suggests that using activity based costing with value management can enhance the quality of the decision‐making process. It demonstrates to managers how they can reduce their costs and improve resource allocation, taking into consideration customer needs and satisfaction.

Originality/value

The paper combines two analytic techniques (VM and ABC) that reveal a menu's true profit and loss picture and a menu item's value.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 24 May 2013

Kuo‐Chien Chang

This study attempts to investigate the causal relationships between perceived trust, perceived value, customer satisfaction, and corporate reputation to understand how…

Downloads
6996

Abstract

Purpose

This study attempts to investigate the causal relationships between perceived trust, perceived value, customer satisfaction, and corporate reputation to understand how customer perceptions evolve into customer loyalty in the restaurant sector.

Design/methodology/approach

This study develops a research model and empirically examines the model by collecting data from two different chain restaurants. Based on the aggregated responses (n=529) from surveys conducted in the two selected chain restaurants, structural equation modeling was used to examine the hypothesized relationships between the variables.

Findings

The results reveal that corporate reputation creates loyalty through trust and value, two factors that act as important mediating variables in the model. Another key finding, based on a comparison of the total effects, is that perceived trust affects customer loyalty through customer satisfaction and that it has a stronger effect than perceived value.

Practical implications

Along with the reputation‐loyalty linkage, which is mediated by trust and value, the minor influence of customer‐perceived value implies that restaurant managers should consider enhancing their diners' perceived value by providing innovative products and services.

Originality/value

This study develops a conceptual stimulus‐organism‐response (S‐O‐R) model that reflects the mediating role of trust and value to indicate the effect of the customer perceptions of the corporate reputation on customer loyalty in the restaurant sector.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 8 July 2013

Robin B. DiPietro, Yang Cao and Charles Partlow

The purpose of this paper is to investigate customers' perceptions and purchase intentions related to green practices in an upscale, green certified restaurant, on a…

Downloads
7999

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate customers' perceptions and purchase intentions related to green practices in an upscale, green certified restaurant, on a university campus located in the southeastern USA. Design/methodology/approach

Design/methodology/approach

The survey was adapted from a previous survey conducted by DiPietro et al.

Findings

The results revealed that customers believed that they are knowledgeable about green practices but they would still like to know more about them. Customers also expressed preferences related to restaurants that are environmentally friendly and use environmentally safe products. Moreover, female customers and people with higher education were more conscious regarding green practices. Customers who utilized green practices at home intended to visit green restaurants more often. Research limitations/implications

Research limitations/implications

The respondents were sampled from an upscale university restaurant, and were mostly within the age range of 50 and older (60.7 percent), which is not typical of a university foodservice operation. The restaurant used in this study catered more to faculty, staff and other professionals close to the university, and did not have a large student customer base. Another limitation of the study is that the prior knowledge and preferences of respondents regarding green practices was not measured. Because of the use of a convenience sample, the results are not generalizeable, but can be used to further research in this area. Practical implications

Practical implications

The practical implications of the study are that restaurant managers should target more specific marketing strategies and employee training related to green practices. Green restaurants that have a high proportion of female and highly educated customers should pay attention to promoting green practices, especially in areas that are visible to the guest, as these are the respondents who had the highest preference for being informed about green practices. Originality/value

Originality/value

The current study looked at an upscale, on-campus university restaurant that had a very highly educated and older population. Previous studies analysed fast food or casual dining restaurant perspectives. Compared to the Hu et al.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 25 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 18000