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Book part

Miriam Muethel and Martin Hoegl

The team members’ expertise has been shown to increase team effectiveness when it is actively coordinated. While in face-to-face teams such expertise coordination unfolds…

Abstract

The team members’ expertise has been shown to increase team effectiveness when it is actively coordinated. While in face-to-face teams such expertise coordination unfolds through direct interaction, expertise coordination in dispersed teams is unlikely to evolve automatically. In this context, shared leadership, that is, the distribution of leadership influence across multiple team members is argued to serve as initiating mechanism for expertise coordination.

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Book part

N. Sharon Hill

Due to geographic dispersion and reliance on technology-mediated communication, developing collaborative capital can be a challenge in a virtual team. Knowledge sharing is…

Abstract

Due to geographic dispersion and reliance on technology-mediated communication, developing collaborative capital can be a challenge in a virtual team. Knowledge sharing is one form of collaborative capital that has been identified as critical to virtual team success. This chapter develops a theoretical model that proposes that shared leadership in virtual teams is positively related to knowledge sharing between team members, and that this relationship will be partially mediated by trust. The model also shows that a team's degree of reliance on technology-mediated communication will moderate the relationships in the model.

Details

Collaborative Capital: Creating Intangible Value
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-222-1

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Book part

Phillip C. Nell, Benoit Decreton and Björn Ambos

With this chapter, we seek to shed light on the question how headquarters (HQ) can cope with geographic distance and effectively transfer relevant knowledge to their…

Abstract

With this chapter, we seek to shed light on the question how headquarters (HQ) can cope with geographic distance and effectively transfer relevant knowledge to their subsidiaries. By constructing a mediating model, we aim at disentangling the effects of geographic distance on the relevance of HQ knowledge to their subsidiaries, via the creation of a shared context between HQ and their subsidiaries. We tested our hypotheses using partial least squares based structural equation modelling on a sample of 124 European subsidiaries. We did not find a significant direct relationship between geographic distance and HQ knowledge relevance. Yet, we found support for our mediation hypotheses that geographic distance makes it more difficult for HQ to establish a shared normative and operational context, but that both dimensions of shared context can help HQ to transfer relevant knowledge to their subsidiaries. We contribute to the research on knowledge flows in multinational corporations (MNC) by investigating knowledge relevance directly rather than knowledge flows as such. We also advance our understanding of shared context in HQ-subsidiary relationships by showing that shared context comprises an operational and a normative dimension. Moreover, we contribute to social learning theory in basing our reasoning on the idea that shared practices and social relationships help overcoming distance to manage knowledge transfer more effectively. Finally, we add to the research of distance in international business by conceptualizing space, organizational context and knowledge transfer in one comprehensive model.

Details

Perspectives on Headquarters-subsidiary Relationships in the Contemporary MNC
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-370-2

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Article

Muhammad Athar Nadeem, Zhiying Liu, Usman Ghani, Amna Younis and Yi Xu

This study, based on social exchange theory, aims to explore knowledge hiding behavior in relation to shared goals of individuals working in teams and trust…

Abstract

Purpose

This study, based on social exchange theory, aims to explore knowledge hiding behavior in relation to shared goals of individuals working in teams and trust (cognitive-based trust and affective-based trust) as a boundary condition on shared goals and knowledge hiding relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

A total sample of 270 reliable questionnaires are collected from university students in China. SPSS and AMOS are employed for the data analysis of the proposed model.

Findings

Findings of the study have indicated that shared goals are negatively associated with knowledge hiding behavior. Furthermore, trust (cognitive-based trust and affective-based trust) moderates the relationship between shared goals and knowledge hiding behavior.

Practical implications

This study has provided empirical proof and in-depth understanding and recommendations for supervisors and administrative authorities to form the culture of groups/teams with shared goals to reduce the undesirable individual behaviors.

Originality/value

This study, among the first empirical studies investigating the relationship between shared goals and knowledge hiding behavior, trust as a moderator, enriches the existing academic literature of and provides valuable insight into the research on knowledge hiding and knowledge management.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article

Sushil S. Chaurasia, Natashaa Kaul, Babita Yadav and Dhirendra Shukla

This paper aims to identify the prominent themes of open innovation for sustainability (OIS) and establish their inter-relationships. Moreover, it examines the importance…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the prominent themes of open innovation for sustainability (OIS) and establish their inter-relationships. Moreover, it examines the importance of success factors (i.e. knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure) and their configuration for co-creating shared value for OIS in manufacturing micro small and medium enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The first stage of investigation determines the relationship between concepts using the bibliometric technique. The second stage examines predictors (e.g. knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure) that contribute to the desired outcomes (creation of shared value in OIS) through necessary condition analysis.

Findings

The investigation demonstrates that all three conditions are necessary for (at different levels) creating shared values for OIS. More specifically, the investigation shows that the different levels of creation of shared value outcomes do require organizations to configure organizational interventions at different levels of the knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure.

Practical implications

To use the concept of open innovation (OI), organizations need to expand their view beyond their existing resource pool and business environment, to include their partners and stakeholders for more inclusivity. Such creation of shared value for OI does require active participation, interaction and collaboration with both manufacturer, retailers and other stakeholders, for developing an insight in creating value for sustainability problem-solving context.

Originality/value

The investigation advances the existing body of knowledge that propagates the significance of knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure as the antecedent to increase the creation of shared value for sustainability by organizations. The investigation advances the existing body of knowledge that propagates the significance of knowledge management system, openness and organizational structure as an antecedent to increase the creation of shared value for sustainability by organizations.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Anil Kumar Goswami and Rakesh Kumar Agrawal

The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate the influence of shared goals and hope on knowledge sharing and knowledge creation in organizations. Furthermore…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to empirically investigate the influence of shared goals and hope on knowledge sharing and knowledge creation in organizations. Furthermore, it examines the mediating role of hope in the relationship between shared goals and knowledge sharing and between shared goals and knowledge creation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has used quantitative research methodology wherein the data have been collected from 221 employees of information technology (IT) companies in India using survey questionnaire. Structural equation modelling has been applied to test the hypotheses of the study.

Findings

The findings of the study reveal that shared goals and hope positively influence knowledge sharing and knowledge creation. Shared goals also affects hope positively. Further, hope acts as a mediator between shared goals and knowledge sharing and between shared goals and knowledge creation.

Research limitations/implications

This study is a cross-sectional study conducted in IT companies in India. It can be supplemented by future studies through qualitative approaches and longitudinal data collection.

Practical implications

The study makes a significant contribution to literature by considering shared goals and hope as antecedents of knowledge sharing and knowledge creation. It provides directions to managers to focus on various interventions to strengthen shared goals and hope amongst employees to motivate them to share and create knowledge that can help the organization to get sustainable competitive advantage.

Originality/value

To the best of authors’ knowledge, this study is an early study conducted to examine the influence of shared goals and hope on knowledge sharing and knowledge creation. Further, hardly any study has examined the mediating role of hope in the relationship between shared goals and knowledge sharing and between shared goals and knowledge creation.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article

Sang Soo Kim

This study aims to examine how exploitation of shared knowledge is related to creative behavior by focusing on the roles of social contextual factors – perceived co-worker…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine how exploitation of shared knowledge is related to creative behavior by focusing on the roles of social contextual factors – perceived co-worker support and perceived relationship conflict.

Design/methodology/approach

The proposed research model in this study posits the following: exploitation mediates the relationship between shared knowledge and creative behavior and perceived co-worker support and perceived relationship conflict moderate the relationship between shared knowledge and creative behavior. For an empirical examination, the model was tested by PLS-SEM using 457 responses gathered from workers of different companies in Korea.

Findings

It turned out that knowledge exploitation fully mediates the relationship between shared knowledge and creative behavior. Also, the findings revealed that the stronger the perceived co-workers support is the stronger the relationship between shared knowledge and knowledge exploitation becomes. In contrast, perceived relationship conflict has a negative moderating effect on the relationship.

Originality/value

This study helps to deepen the understanding of how knowledge sharing impacts creative behavior in light of social context and the active utilization of shared knowledge. In addition, this study attempts to provide new perspectives by suggesting double aspects of perceived relationship conflict, which eventually extending the previous research on conflict in the field of knowledge management and creative behavior.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Content available
Article

Rama Krishna Kishore Vandavasi, David C. McConville, Jin-Feng Uen and Prasanthi Yepuru

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of knowledge sharing among team members on the development of shared leadership and innovative behaviour.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of knowledge sharing among team members on the development of shared leadership and innovative behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 64 management teams and 427 individuals working in 26 different hotels in the hospitality industry in Taiwan.

Findings

The results show that knowledge sharing has both direct and indirect effects on the development of shared leadership and individual innovative behaviour.

Research limitations/implications

Results suggest that knowledge sharing supports the occurrence of shared leadership, leading to an increase in innovative behaviour. The authors infer from the findings that encouraging a culture of knowledge sharing can have a positive impact on the creativity of teams.

Originality/value

This study advances knowledge of shared leadership as a mediator using a multilevel approach to test antecedents of innovative behaviour in the Taiwan hotel industry.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 41 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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Article

Ming‐Ji James Lin and Chih‐Jou Chen

The purpose of the study is to examine the influence of internal integration and external integration on three types of shared knowledge (shared knowledge of internal…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to examine the influence of internal integration and external integration on three types of shared knowledge (shared knowledge of internal capabilities, customers, and suppliers) and whether more leads to superior firm innovation capability and product competitive advantage.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on results from a large‐scale survey. The empirical data used in the study comprises of 245 high technology firms in Taiwan. This study applies the confirmatory factor analysis to examine the reliability and validity of the measurement model, and the structural equation modeling (SEM) to investigate the hypotheses and research model.

Findings

The results show that internal integration and external integration significantly influence shared knowledge of internal capabilities, customers and suppliers among new product development (NPD) team members. The results also indicate that team members' shared knowledge enable the firm to improve innovation capability and new product competitive advantage.

Research limitations/implications

As the data used in the study was cross‐sectional, the causal relationships and the sustainability of firm and product innovative performance cannot be easily captured. Future research can examine how factors of individual traits, organizational characteristics, and external environmental factors may influence the shared knowledge and product competitive advantage.

Practical implications

This study emphasizes the importance of the firm's integration to utilize and share knowledge of internal capabilities, customers and suppliers effectively. Besides, the relationships among internal/external integration, shared knowledge, firm innovation capability and product competitive advantage may provide a clue regarding how firms can manage integrations and promote knowledgesharing culture to sustain their firm innovation capability and product competitive advantage.

Originality/value

As only little empirical research has been conducted on the impact of internal/external integration on the firm's innovative capability and product competitive advantage through shared knowledge, the empirical evidence reported here makes a valuable contribution in this highly important area.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 16 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article

Mohammadbashir Sedighi, Stephan Lukosch, Frances Brazier, Mohsen Hamedi and Cees van Beers

This paper aims to explore the relationships between participants’ perceived benefits of sharing knowledge privately, within a group or with the general public within an…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore the relationships between participants’ perceived benefits of sharing knowledge privately, within a group or with the general public within an organisational knowledge network. The quality and quantity of knowledge shared are explored in relation to the level of knowledge sharing visibility (both content and participants’ profiles).

Design/methodology/approach

A research framework of perceived benefits of knowledge sharing is designed; survey and content analysis are used to explore influences of perceived benefits on the quantity and quality of knowledge shared by participants for each level of knowledge sharing within an organisation. The research model is empirically tested using a questionnaire survey with 205 participants and content analysis of their contributions in a high-tech corporate group. This study uses the partial least squares path-modelling method to explore relationships between constructs of the research model.

Findings

The current research results show that intrinsic benefits are more influential than extrinsic benefits for private knowledge sharing, while extrinsic rewards play an important role at the public knowledge sharing within organisations. In addition, results indicate that both the quality and quantity of knowledge sharing at the group-level knowledge sharing are significantly higher than at the private and the public levels.

Practical implications

Contemporary knowledge management systems are developed by integrating communication channels in different visibility levels of knowledge exchange. Managers of knowledge management systems are advised to use the research outcome for developing incentive strategies in different levels.

Originality/value

In contrast to previous studies that focus on only one level of knowledge sharing, this paper explores relationships between perceived benefits of knowledge sharing with the quantity and quality of shared knowledge for three distinct levels of knowledge sharing.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

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