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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2008

Gui Ying Yang and Thao Lê

One of the main strengths of qualitative research is to focus on ideas, concepts and meanings involving individuals and groups of people in their own discourse. Instead of…

Abstract

One of the main strengths of qualitative research is to focus on ideas, concepts and meanings involving individuals and groups of people in their own discourse. Instead of testing a narrow hypothesis or making a generalisation about a population on certain issues under investigation, qualitative research attempts to present different insights which can only be unearthed by direct and personal engagement with research participants (Brannen, 1992). This engagement should take place in a natural social context where real life takes place. However, conducting qualitative research in China can pose a huge challenge for both Chinese and international researchers. This paper examines some problems (ethics, linguistics, etc) of using qualitative research methods and tools such as interviews, participant observation, and Critical Discourse Analysis in China.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

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Article
Publication date: 24 February 2012

Ayantunji Gbadamosi

Given that a “one size fits all” strategy might not be sufficiently robust enough to capture all the idiosyncrasies of the ethnic minority market in Britain, due to the…

Abstract

Purpose

Given that a “one size fits all” strategy might not be sufficiently robust enough to capture all the idiosyncrasies of the ethnic minority market in Britain, due to the heterogeneous nature of their consumption behaviour, the purpose of this paper is to specifically explore clothing acculturation of Black African women in London, UK.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 20 in‐depth interviews were conducted with women of Black African ethnicity resident in London, as recruited through the use of purposive and snowballing sampling methods.

Findings

Essentially, the study shows that clothing acculturation among these women is influenced by a number of interconnected factors which are identified and categorised in this study to be weather condition, social factors, religion, and personal factors.

Originality/value

Theoretically, the study supplements the existing ethnic minority studies in the literature, and extends understanding on acculturation and women's consumption of clothing. The implications of the study for marketing practice are discussed especially in relation to the use of segmentation, targeting and positioning strategy by organisations towards satisfying their disparate target markets in the society.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2014

Dewi Jaimangal-Jones

The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the use of ethnography and participant observation in event studies. It considers the role and benefits of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the issues surrounding the use of ethnography and participant observation in event studies. It considers the role and benefits of participant observation in terms of understanding event audiences and provides examples of the range of participant motivations and preferences such approaches can reveal and explore. As a methodological paper it focuses on the processes, challenges and benefits surrounding the utilisation of ethnographic methods within events research, with specific examples taken from an ethnographic study into contemporary dance music culture to contextualise the discussion.

Design/methodology/approach

Ethnography and participant observation are flexible research approaches characterised by varying levels of participation in and observation of different cultural groups and activities. This paper focuses specifically on participant observation revolving around field trips, focus groups, internet research and key informant interviews.

Findings

The challenges facing ethnographic researchers studying event audiences include identifying opportunities for observation and participation, identity negotiation for different research settings, their positioning on the participant observer spectrum, recruiting participants, recording data and the extent to which research takes an overt or covert approach, bearing in mind ethics and participant reactivity. It concludes that once these challenges are addressed, this multifaceted approach provides a valuable avenue for researchers exploring the range of socio-cultural forces at play surrounding event audiences and their experiences.

Originality/value

It advocates a shift from attempts to quantify audience motivations and experiences, to methods which seek to understand them more fully through focusing on the entirety of the event experience and the influence of surrounding cultural networks and discourses.

Details

International Journal of Event and Festival Management, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1758-2954

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Tom Webb and Richard Thelwell

The purpose of this paper is to consider the cultural similarities and differences between elite referees concerning their preparation and performance in dealing with…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the cultural similarities and differences between elite referees concerning their preparation and performance in dealing with reduced player behaviour.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews were employed to collect the data. The 37 participants from England, Spain and Italy were selected through the use of purposive sampling, and all were working in the field of refereeing as current elite-level referees, ex-elite-level referees, referee assessors, referee coaches, or managers and administrators from bodies that manage and train referees. Inductive content analysis was employed to generate themes from the raw data.

Findings

Referees have identified particular issues related specifically to player behaviour and also identified specific traits pertaining to players from certain countries. Furthermore, results demonstrate that referees have begun to alter their preparation and performance due to the pressure they perceive exists within association football and, more specifically, from the players themselves.

Originality/value

This study is the first to compare cross-cultural elite referee responses regarding their preparation and performance related to player behaviour.

Details

Sport, Business and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-678X

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2003

Rosalind Hanmer

This article’s principle aim is the investigation into the underdeveloped field of lesbian audience research. It theorises the relationship between the text of Xena…

Abstract

This article’s principle aim is the investigation into the underdeveloped field of lesbian audience research. It theorises the relationship between the text of Xena Warrior Princess a television programme and a fanclub called Xenasubtexttalk that evolved on the Internet. The researcher has drawn on evidence from a case study and participant observation over a twelve month period, the gathering of postings from bulletin boards and continuing interviews lasting between one and two hours conducted over the Internet. This has revealed some of the practices and rituals of two self‐identified lesbians who participated in this fanclub. Informed by a postmodernist feminist framework several issues of methodology are discussed. The main theme in this study’s findings is that these fans have produced through the appropriation of this particular text, biographies that represent a “coming out narrative”.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 23 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2015

Ayantunji Gbadamosi

This paper aims to unravel how membership of Pentecostal fellowships aids the entrepreneurial activities of African-Caribbean (AC) members. While many issues about the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to unravel how membership of Pentecostal fellowships aids the entrepreneurial activities of African-Caribbean (AC) members. While many issues about the entrepreneurial engagements of AC people have been discussed in the literature, there are far less studies documented about the link of these activities to faith, especially in the context of Pentecostalism.

Design/methodology/approach

Adopting the interpretive research paradigm, a total of 25 tape-recorded, semi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with AC entrepreneurs who are members of Pentecostal faith-based organisations in London, and pastors in this same sphere. Sixteen of the respondents are entrepreneurs running and managing their businesses, seven are pastors and the remaining two fall in both categories, as they are both entrepreneurs and still serving as pastors in churches in London. Rather than merely serving as gatekeepers for information, the pastors are active participants/respondents in the study.

Findings

The paper highlights the challenges confronting the AC ethnic entrepreneurs, but also suggests that those in the Pentecostal faith are motivated and emboldened by the shared values in this religion to navigate the volatile marketing environment. It unveils participants’ faith in God as their key business survival strategy. It also shows the unwavering confidence of the respondents that this religious stance results in outstanding business successes like increase in sales and profits, competitive edge, divine creativity and innovation, opportunity recognition, networks, institutional support and other factors that underpin entrepreneurship.

Originality/value

This study unpacks the thickly blurred link between Pentecostalism as a thriving religious orientation among the AC ethnic group in the UK and their entrepreneurial engagements.

Details

Society and Business Review, vol. 10 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5680

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Article
Publication date: 22 August 2008

Ben Light, Gordon Fletcher and Alison Adam

The purpose of this paper is to investigate information communications technologies (ICT)‐mediated inclusion and exclusion in terms of sexuality through a study of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate information communications technologies (ICT)‐mediated inclusion and exclusion in terms of sexuality through a study of a commercial social networking web site for gay men.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper uses an approach based on technological inscription and the commodification of difference to study Gaydar, a commercial social networking site.

Findings

Through the activities, events and interactions offered by Gaydar, the study identifies a series of contrasting identity constructions and market segmentations that are constructed through the cyclic commodification of difference. These are fuelled by a particular series of meanings attached to gay male sexualities which serve to keep gay men positioned as a niche market.

Research limitations/implications

The research centres on the study of one, albeit widely used, web site with a very specific set of purposes. The study offers a model for future research on sexuality and ICTs.

Originality/value

This study places sexuality centre stage in an ICT‐mediated environment and provides insights into the contemporary phenomenon of social networking. As a sexualised object, Gaydar presents a semiosis of politicised messages that question heteronormativity while simultaneously contributing to the definition of an increasingly globalised, commercialised and monolithic form of gay male sexuality defined against ICT.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2017

Ronan de Kervenoael, Alexandre Schwob, Mark Palmer and Geoff Simmons

Chronic consumption practice has been greatly accelerated by mobile, interactive and smartphone gaming technology devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore how…

Abstract

Purpose

Chronic consumption practice has been greatly accelerated by mobile, interactive and smartphone gaming technology devices. The purpose of this paper is to explore how chronic consumption of smartphone gaming produces positive coping practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Underpinned by cognitive framing theory, empirical insights from 11 focus groups (n=62) reveal how smartphone gaming enhances positive coping amongst gamers and non-gamers.

Findings

The findings reveal how the chronic consumption of games allows technology to act with privileged agency that resolves tensions between individuals and collectives. Consumption narratives of smartphone games, even when play is limited, lead to the identification of three cognitive frames through which positive coping processes operate: the market-generated, social being and citizen frames.

Research limitations/implications

This paper adds to previous research by providing an understanding of positive coping practice in the smartphone chronic gaming consumption.

Originality/value

In smartphone chronic gaming consumption, cognitive frames enable positive coping by fostering appraisal capacities in which individuals confront hegemony, culture and alterity-morality concerns.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 30 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2014

Sofia Branco Sousa and António Magalhães

The aim of this chapter is to bring to the forefront the potential of discourse analysis in higher education research. It characterises discourse analysis as a…

Abstract

The aim of this chapter is to bring to the forefront the potential of discourse analysis in higher education research. It characterises discourse analysis as a constructionist perspective, underlying its empirical applications in the field of higher education. A two-phase model is proposed as a possible answer to the often stressed lack of methodological devices in the area of discourse analysis. This model combines the theory of discourse of Laclau and Mouffe with the critical discourse analysis of Fairclough, on the assumption that they have complementary elements that may be employed for research in the field of higher education. We selected a text to exemplify the use of discourse organisers (phase one) and to analyse the way discourses become dominant/excluded (phase two). We conclude by arguing that higher education research looking into discourses has major advantages to consider discourse analysis, both as a theory and method.

Details

Theory and Method in Higher Education Research
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-682-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Anita M.M. Liu

This paper proposes a conceptual framework underpinning the conflicting key elements in analyzing sustainable development (SD) of real estate property and the environment.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper proposes a conceptual framework underpinning the conflicting key elements in analyzing sustainable development (SD) of real estate property and the environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The key elements in the framework are the economic, the socio‐environment, the socio‐economic and the legal systems which represent different competing values.

Findings

The competing values framework encompasses the development of environmental legislation and other governmental policies towards environmental sustainability of construction activities. The competing values which direct policy‐making are modelled as short term (resource exploitation) versus long term (resource sustainability) and flexibility (freedom in land use/development) versus control (planning and building laws). As people attain harmonious outcome (intra‐ and inter‐group) in arriving at consensus and directions towards “SD” they do so as members of a complex social organism that has multiple group memberships, interests and loyalties.

Research limitations/implications

As loyalties and interests shift, harmony is in transit, and directions of actions and attitudes change as a function of time. The choice of (potentially conflicting) attainable goals towards SD is a consequence of power play amongst stakeholders.

Practical implications

The paper is important in highlighting the main issues in conceptualizing key conflicting elements in the formulation of policies for SD.

Originality/value

A definition of harmony relating to social exchanges and cultural settings with emphasis on dynamic equilibrium is proposed for the formulation of “SD” policies.

Details

Property Management, vol. 24 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

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