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Article
Publication date: 27 January 2023

Carla Freire and Iris Barbosa

The purpose of this article is to compare graduates' score rates in two multiple mini-interview (MMI) stations designed to assess graduates from several academic areas…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to compare graduates' score rates in two multiple mini-interview (MMI) stations designed to assess graduates from several academic areas: confidant vs stress interview and synchronous vs asynchronous. This relates to three transversal competences (TCs) (learning to learn [LL], positive professional attitude [PPA] and market orientation [MO]) and analyses the impact of global performance during interviews, in the context of the hypothetical hiring decision.

Design/methodology/approach

The paired samples t-test was employed to compare the scores obtained by 130 graduates in two assessment exercises, which were designed to evaluate the same set of TCs. Multiple linear regression models were estimated to model the effect of global performance during the interview on the hypothetical hiring decision.

Findings

Results indicate a significant difference in averages between the graduates' TCs scores in confidant interviews, when compared with stress interviews. However, this is only observed in synchronous evaluations. In both interviews, the assessment of the participant's global performance has a significant effect on the hypothetical hiring decision.

Research limitations/implications

In the confidant interview, the interviewer was also the synchronous evaluator, which may have affected their focus on the evaluation process. The order in which graduates participated in the confidant and stress interviews varied, thus possibly influencing their performance.

Practical implications

The results are relevant for HEIs, graduates and employers involved in the evaluation of TCs.

Originality/value

The article derives from a broader research project which adapted the MMI model to other academic areas. It considers two instruments to evaluate graduates' TCs and two assessment circumstances.

Details

Education + Training, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 January 2023

Rodela Anjum Khan

This article presents fieldwork perspectives gained from conducting qualitative research among Bangladeshi immigrant communities in Lisbon (Portugal), Boston…

Abstract

Purpose

This article presents fieldwork perspectives gained from conducting qualitative research among Bangladeshi immigrant communities in Lisbon (Portugal), Boston (Massachusetts – USA) and Brussels (Belgium). This discussion will primarily benefit those who conduct, or are interested in, undertaking qualitative research with Bangladeshi immigrants, one of the largest immigrant communities represented globally.

Design/methodology/approach

The author conducted 32 semi-structured interviews using a qualitative descriptive approach.

Findings

The author discusses and demonstrates effective strategies to acquire meaningful insights from fieldwork while interviewing Bangladeshi immigrants. Though maintaining standard criteria for producing credible qualitative research is crucial, the adoption of a flexible and dynamic approach is also necessary. The article highlights versatile approaches taken in the following four areas: (1) establishing community presence, (2) managing informed consent, (3) adjusting research instruments and protocols, and (4) dealing with unexpected situations during fieldwork. Moreover, these elements are examined within the context of navigating the role and positionality of the researcher.

Research limitations/implications

The generalizability of these techniques is limited to this study, but similar issues in conducting qualitative research with Bangladeshi communities and other immigrant groups can be found.

Originality/value

This paper addresses a gap in the discussion of fieldwork strategies for conducting qualitative research with Bangladeshi immigrant communities. Practical knowledge for researchers facilitating qualitative research with this group is relatively scarce despite the growing presence of these communities globally.

Details

Qualitative Research Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1443-9883

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 17 November 2022

Niamh M. Brennan

Unlike quantitative studies, interview data generally cannot be validated; yet, they are typically the only evidence of the research. This study develops protocols for…

1831

Abstract

Purpose

Unlike quantitative studies, interview data generally cannot be validated; yet, they are typically the only evidence of the research. This study develops protocols for using verbatim interview quotations in research and for assessing the quality of interview quotations.

Design/methodology/approach

This research reviews 20 empirical papers using in-depth interviews containing 600 interview quotations to examine authors' approaches to verbatim interviewee quotations. The research analyses the sample papers for interview transcript handling, selection of quotations, the number and length of interview quotations, how they are placed and presented, the proportion of interviewee voices reproduced in quotations and the disclosure of protocols for translating and editing quotations. This paper includes illustrative interview quotations as exemplars of best practice.

Findings

Given the modest discussion of the principles influencing the reproduction of quotations in research, this study develops a framework for evaluating prior research. Researchers use a wide variety of practices to reproduce interview quotations in accounting research. The issues derived from this review, and their application to interview-based papers, frame an argument for a general set of quality criteria and protocols rather than rigid rules for assessing qualitative work. These criteria can serve as anchor points for qualitative evaluation.

Originality/value

There is little guidance on the use of interview quotations in qualitative research which this study bridges.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 35 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 March 2011

Gisli Gudjonsson and Theresa Joyce

People with intellectual disabilities commonly come into contact with the criminal justice system as victims, witnesses or suspects. Their intellectual disabilities may…

2026

Abstract

People with intellectual disabilities commonly come into contact with the criminal justice system as victims, witnesses or suspects. Their intellectual disabilities may make them disadvantaged in relation to all components of the criminal justice system, including police interviews, fitness to plead and stand trial, capacity to give evidence in court, and issues to do with criminal responsibility and sentencing. The focus in this paper is on police interviews and the capacity of adults with intellectual disabilities to give evidence in Court. Research into the types of vulnerability seen by people interviewed by police have focused on interviewees' understanding of the Oath and their legal rights, suggestibility, acquiescence, compliance and perceptions of the consequences of making self‐incriminating admissions. The essential components of any interview and testifying in court require that the person can communicate effectively and give reliable answers and accounts of events. Research into police interviews has highlighted the importance of taking into account the interviewee's vulnerabilities and providing appropriate support, and suggests a more humane approach to interviews and when vulnerable people testify in Court.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 May 1977

D.S. Taylor and P.L. Wright

This article describes a course in interviewing skills for local authority auditors. It represents a further development of the “Bradford Approach” to interviewing skills…

Abstract

This article describes a course in interviewing skills for local authority auditors. It represents a further development of the “Bradford Approach” to interviewing skills training developed by Randell et al for appraisal interviewing and subsequently extended to include grievance interviewing by Gill. As such, it relies heavily on the notion that successful interviewing depends upon a number of precise behavioural skills which can best be acquired through practice in role plays. The course was developed at the request of the Internal Audit Section of Humberside County Council, who felt that existing courses for auditors did not provide adequate training in interviewing skills.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 1 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 June 1977

Tony Keenan

It has been known for many years that the selection interview is often a far from perfect instrument. However, the unabated popularity of training courses in the selection…

Abstract

It has been known for many years that the selection interview is often a far from perfect instrument. However, the unabated popularity of training courses in the selection interview is only one of many indications that managers have no intention of abandoning its use. Given this, it is obviously very important that such training be designed to be maximally effective. This question of the effectiveness of interview training has been investigated as part of an ongoing research programme on the selection interview which is being carried out at Heriot‐Watt University. Both our research findings, and our practical experience of running interview courses ourselves, have led to the development of a new approach to interview training which we have called individual‐centred training. This article describes the origins and basic principles of individual‐centred training for interviewers.

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 1 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1989

Robert Wareing and Janet Stockdale

The reliability and validity of decisions on selection, placement,appraisal and promotion made in employment interviews are questioned.The article concludes that a bias is…

Abstract

The reliability and validity of decisions on selection, placement, appraisal and promotion made in employment interviews are questioned. The article concludes that a bias is established early on in interviews and this is followed by a favourable or an unfavourable decision. Unfavourable information has a greater influence on interviewers. They seek information to support or refute their hypotheses whereby information that contradicts a hypothesis is ignored.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 27 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1981

Judith Goldie and Jacki Pritchard

Project INISS was established on July 1st 1978 with a grant from the Department of Health and Social Security, and completed its work in October 1980. The aim of the…

2168

Abstract

Project INISS was established on July 1st 1978 with a grant from the Department of Health and Social Security, and completed its work in October 1980. The aim of the project was to evaluate a number of small‐scale experimental innovations for the improvement of information services in social services departments. Three interviewing techniques were used: one to one, group and telephone interviews. This article describes these methods and offers guidelines for their suitability in particular situations.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1981

Clive Fletcher

The interview is still the main tool in selection, and rather ironically the pressure put on users of psychological tests by the Sex Discrimination and Race Relations Acts…

Abstract

The interview is still the main tool in selection, and rather ironically the pressure put on users of psychological tests by the Sex Discrimination and Race Relations Acts may lead to even more emphasis being placed on interviews—despite the questions raised about their effectiveness. The research literature on interviewing is substantial and covers a wide range of variables. Strangely, however, one element of the interview situation has scarcely been touched by this research and that is the interviewee. The picture one gets from most studies is that of an inert lump of material being placed in front of the interviewers for them to respond to—the candidate is simply a passive source of information, and the real interest is in how the interviewers go about eliciting and processing this information. Some researchers even dispense with real candidates altogether, preferring to use written pen‐pictures which the “interviewers” assess.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 10 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Choi Sang Long

– The purpose of this paper is to examine how employers can get the best results from job interviews.

1384

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how employers can get the best results from job interviews.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper considers the relative merits of structured interviews, behavioral interviews, experience-based interviews and situational interviews.

Findings

This paper explains that each type of interview has its place, dependent on the type of job to be filled.

Practical implications

It is revealed that proper preparation by employers can help them to get the most suitable candidates.

Originality/value

This paper reveals how employers can learn to conduct effective interviews that produce reliable results.

Details

Human Resource Management International Digest, vol. 22 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0967-0734

Keywords

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