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Article
Publication date: 19 December 2016

Carolyn Blackburn

A case study is reported of a relationship-based early intervention (EI) service for children with complex needs in New Zealand. The purpose of this paper is to explore…

Abstract

Purpose

A case study is reported of a relationship-based early intervention (EI) service for children with complex needs in New Zealand. The purpose of this paper is to explore parent and professional views and perceptions about the key characteristics of a relationship-based EI service.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study involved interviews and observations with 39 participants (10 children, 11 parents and 18 professionals).

Findings

Parents appreciated the knowledgeable, well-trained professionals who invested time in getting to know (and love) children and families and family practices, worked together in harmony and valued the contribution that parents made to their child’s progress and achievement. Professionals described the key characteristics of the service in terms of the range of therapies offered by the service, the focus on a strengths-based and family-focussed approach, play-based assessments, acceptance and value of family practices (including responsiveness to Maori and bi-culturalism), appropriate and respectful places to meet and greet families and work with children, and recruitment and retention of humble professionals who identified with the ethos of the model. Observable social processes and structures within the delivery of the model include respectful professional interactions and relationships with children and families, integrated professional working, effective and timely communication between professionals and families, pedagogy of listening, waiting and personalisation, engaged families and actively participating children.

Originality/value

This case study emphasises the significance of professional love and relational pedagogy to EI services and the value of this to improving parent-child relationships and children’s long-term outcomes.

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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2012

Ruth O'Shaughnessy, Julia Nelki, Anna Chiumento, Amira Hassan and Atif Rahman

This paper aims to describe the evaluation of an innovative pilot mental health service for asylum seeking mothers and their babies in their first year of life, and to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to describe the evaluation of an innovative pilot mental health service for asylum seeking mothers and their babies in their first year of life, and to highlight the challenges and possibilities when intervening with this group.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed‐methods evaluation was designed based upon the participatory action research framework, viewing mothers and their infants as active participants in the research process. Evaluation comprised reflective infant‐led session evaluations, CARE Index video microanalysis, and reflective focus group discussions. CARE Index analysis was conducted by a trained Psychologist and an external coder to ensure reliability of findings. Focus group discussions were thematically analysed, and reflective infant‐led session evaluations scored for comparison.

Findings

Evaluation has highlighted the imperative of designing responsive service models able to adapt to cultural nuances and the realities of asylum seekers' lives. Qualitative data provide a rich narrative of the benefits of therapeutic interventions for this group, which are reaffirmed by CARE Index analysis and session evaluations.

Research limitations/implications

As a pilot service the numbers involved in this evaluation are small. Furthermore, a paucity of measurement tools validated in languages other than English forced reliance upon self‐designed tools such as the reflective infant‐led session evaluation designed to complement a “keeping the baby in mind” ethos of the intervention. This has been complemented by CARE Index analysis and qualitative focus group discussions. The combination of measurement instruments and data analysis tools provides a comprehensive indication of the impact of this pilot intervention.

Practical implications

The benefits and challenges of establishing an earlyintervention therapeutic service for refugee and asylum seeking women and their infants are detailed and reflected upon. It is hoped that by chronicling the experience and findings an evidence base is being built to support development of future innovative service models.

Social implications

Policy aspirations to meet the needs of refugee and asylum seeking women and their infants identify the need to provide rights‐based, humane and person‐centred services. The pilot model described here meets these aspirations and can be used as an adaptable and responsive model upon which other services can draw.

Originality/value

The paper provides a comprehensive service evaluation, highlighting key policy and practice implications to support the delivery of health and social care services targeting refugee and asylum seeking women and their infants.

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Publication date: 23 July 2014

Christopher Watson, Shelley Neilsen Gatti, Megan Cox, Mary Harrison and Jill Hennes

This chapter charts the recent evolution of research focused on reflective supervision provided to practitioners delivering services to young children and their families…

Abstract

This chapter charts the recent evolution of research focused on reflective supervision provided to practitioners delivering services to young children and their families through early intervention programs. The authors explore research focused on defining reflective supervision, identifying five essential elements or “active ingredients” of reflective supervision as a professional development model and demonstrating the impact on practitioners. The impact studies described in this chapter have produced empirical data demonstrating an increase in reflective supervision behaviors as a result of participation. In addition, the studies provide qualitative accounts of practitioners’ experiences, conveying positive effects on intervention practice and reduction of practitioner job stress.

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Article
Publication date: 11 April 2018

Farooq Ahmed, M. Muzamil Naqshbandi, Sharan Kaur and Boon Kwee Ng

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship of leadership styles (paternalistic, authentic and democratic) with relationship-based employee governance and…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship of leadership styles (paternalistic, authentic and democratic) with relationship-based employee governance and open service innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a structured questionnaire from 422 medical professionals working in the Malaysian healthcare sector.

Findings

Results of several statistical analyses showed that the three leadership styles positively influence relationship-based employee governance and open service innovation. Results also confirmed the mediating role of relationship-based employee governance in the relationships between the three leadership styles and open service innovation.

Research limitations/implications

This research used a cross-sectional study design; use of a longitudinal research design in future research can provide a better interpretation of the underlying causality. A policy insight can be drawn from this research to generate awareness about effective leadership styles and the role of relationship-based employee governance in the successful implementation of open service innovation in the Malaysian healthcare sector.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to leadership, open innovation, and organizational governance literature by highlighting how leadership styles affect relationship-based employee governance and open innovation. It also offers policy insights to practitioners in the Malaysian healthcare sector on how to enhance open service innovation outcomes.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2021

Kathy Sanderson

This paper aims to investigate the socio-psychological systems in organizations that structurally support workplace aggression.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to investigate the socio-psychological systems in organizations that structurally support workplace aggression.

Design/methodology/approach

Using both a structural and contextual model of intimate partner violence (IPV), the factors supporting workplace aggression were analyzed. The narratives were provided from the participants’ lived experiences of workplace aggression, producing clear indications of where formal and informal power reside.

Findings

The methods of power and control used by workplace perpetrators parallel those illustrated in IPV. The inaction of management and the lack of social support enabled informal power asymmetries and the organizational norm of silence. The findings have implications for how workplaces view and intervene in relationship-based violence.

Originality/value

Workplace aggression has been studied from a conflict management perspective, without exploring the components that enable and support organizational abuse. As a result, organizational responses to workplace aggression have failed to address the complex relationship-based components and consequences. The primary contribution of this study is the disruption of the conflict-based perspective of workplace aggression into a more appropriate framework of violence, power and control.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 December 2015

Trish Hafford-Letchfield and Peter Lavender

Achieving meaningful participation and co-production for older people in care requires radical approaches. The purpose of this paper is to explore an innovation where…

Abstract

Purpose

Achieving meaningful participation and co-production for older people in care requires radical approaches. The purpose of this paper is to explore an innovation where learning interventions were introduced into care settings and older people matched to community-based learning mentors to develop partnerships. The authors explore how the concept of learning might be used as a paradigm to raise the quality of care in institutionalised settings using a co-productive and relationship-based approach to promote wellbeing.

Design/methodology/approach

A structured evaluation drew on qualitative data captured from interviews with older people (n=25) and learning mentors (n=22) to reflect on the potential benefits and challenges involved when introducing learning interventions in care settings. This was contextualised alongside data captured from stakeholders (n=10) including a care home manager, social care and education commissioners, trustees and project staff to assess the interdisciplinary contribution of lifelong learning to quality improvement.

Findings

Introducing learning interventions to older people within care settings promoted participation, advocacy and relationship-based care which in turn helped to create a positive culture. Given the current challenges to improve quality in care services, drawing on a paradigm of learning may encourage older people to retain their independence as care homes strive towards a person-centred approach. Promoting social activities and leisure using learning was found to foster closer working relationships between older people and the wider community. These had a levelling effect through reciprocity, using an asset based approach. There were benefits for the care provider as the partnerships formed enabled people to raise both individual and collective concerns about care and support.

Originality/value

Raising and sustaining the quality of support for older people requires input from the wider public sector beyond health and social care. Purposeful engagement with other disciplines such as learning and leisure offers the potential to realise a more sustainable model of user choice, person-centred support and user involvement. Being engaged through learning can nourish membership in the community for marginalised populations such as older people living in care homes.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 16 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 8 July 2014

Sean Creaney

The purpose of this paper is to consider the position of relationship-based practice in youth justice by looking at how “effective programmes” seem to have been given…

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596

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the position of relationship-based practice in youth justice by looking at how “effective programmes” seem to have been given heightened importance over “effective” young person-worker relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

By critically reviewing the literature on the topic, the paper promotes debate on the position of relationship-based practice in youth justice.

Findings

It is argued that the young person-worker relationship is very important. A genuine and empathetic relationship can reduce the chances of re-offending and improve the child's personal, social and emotional development. By being respectful and listening attentively to children's “life stories”, barriers can be overcome, potentially resulting in lifestyle, social and behavioural change. However, although there is evidence that developing a trusting relationship is “effective” and that it is a key component of effective practice, what is less clear is how to practically secure the engagement of a child.

Originality/value

In comparison to the emphasis on effective programme intervention, there has been less research done on the “characteristics” of effective staff practice in youth justice.

Details

Safer Communities, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-8043

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Ann Anka, Pernille Sorensen, Marian Brandon and Sue Bailey

The purpose of this paper is to report on findings from an evaluative research study which looked at a timed intervention model of practice comprising of up to 24 weeks of…

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2889

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on findings from an evaluative research study which looked at a timed intervention model of practice comprising of up to 24 weeks of intensive meetings with adult service users set up by one local authority in England, to prevent and delay the need for care and support. A particular focus of this paper is on adults who hoard.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employed a mixed-methods design, consisting of interviews with service users (n=13), social workers (n=3), social work managers (n=2) and stakeholders from external services and agencies (n=6). It included a costing analysis of staff time and an analysis of goals of service users and “satisfaction with life” self-report questionnaires (n=20), completed at pre- and post-intervention stages.

Findings

There was evidence that social workers used strengths, relationship-based and outcome-based focused approaches in their work. The techniques used by social workers to engage, achieve change and assess effectiveness with service users varied. These techniques included the use of photographs to enable the service user to map and assess their own progress over time, encouraging hoarders to declutter and reclaim their living space. The service users valued the time the social workers spent with them and the way that they were treated with sensitivity and respect.

Research limitations/implications

The study focused on one local authority in England; there was no comparison group. This, and the small sample size, means that statistical generalisations cannot be made and only limited conclusions can be drawn from the quantitative data.

Originality/value

The paper provides insights into the work undertaken by social workers with adults who hoard. It contributes to the body of knowledge on effective social work interventions with adults who hoard.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2021

Gillian MacIntyre and Ailsa Stewart

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Pytlowana and Stenfert Kroese’s article on the experiences of professionals working with parents with learning…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Pytlowana and Stenfert Kroese’s article on the experiences of professionals working with parents with learning disabilities by exploring challenges and good practice in this area.

Design/methodology/approach

Key areas of practice were identified for further exploration by drawing on research studies with parents with learning disabilities.

Findings

While there is growing evidence of good practice around working with parents with learning disabilities, a number of challenges around communication and relationship-based practice remain. The paper recommends further training and education for those working in this complex area of practice.

Originality/value

The paper adds value by bringing together evidence from across a number of studies to highlight good practice.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2004

Malla Praveen Bhasa

This paper wades through the extant corporate governance literature and identifies the existence of four different governance models in practice. Though market‐centric and…

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14940

Abstract

This paper wades through the extant corporate governance literature and identifies the existence of four different governance models in practice. Though market‐centric and relationship‐based models have been widely discussed in corporate governance literature, a dearth of two other governance models viz., transition and emerging governance models have not been extensively covered. This paper tries to identify the existence of the transition governance model and also a new governance model that is emerging in some developing countries. An attempt has been made to narrate the way all the four governance models function in different economies, and assumes that understanding the governance quadrilateral would be a pre‐requisite for understanding global corporate governance.

Details

Corporate Governance: The international journal of business in society, vol. 4 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

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