Search results

1 – 10 of over 72000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 September 2018

Wei Xiong and Tao Wang

Feelings about conflict in labor relations are determined by both the objective conditions surrounding the dimension of labor relations and their subjective evaluation…

Abstract

Purpose

Feelings about conflict in labor relations are determined by both the objective conditions surrounding the dimension of labor relations and their subjective evaluation. This study aims to examine features of the subjective evaluation factors in labor relations for new generation employees born in the post-1980s, transitional China, and to explore the conflict reduction strategies in labor relations.

Design/methodology/approach

This study designed items and a scale to measure employees’ subjective evaluation bias regarding labor relations, and conducted a survey of 1,500 employees in 80 Chinese enterprises. It conducted a principal components analysis of the subjective evaluation biases, and a covariance analysis to explore differences in the common factors between employees of two generations. Comparing the subjective bias with the objective status of labor relations, as well as with employers’ expectations, this study analyzed the feelings toward conflict and conflict management strategies.

Findings

There are eight common factors in the subjective evaluation bias toward labor relations, four of which show significant differences between employees of two generations. Employers should study these differences, and apply conflict reduction measures to manage labor relations.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to propose the concept of a subjective evaluation bias regarding labor relations, and examine the common factors and features among new generation employees. It establishes a model for feelings toward conflict through four combinations of the subjective preferences and objective status dimensions. This study offers new insights for reducing workplace conflict.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 July 2008

Ronit Yitshaki

The aim of this paper is to examine the inherent and actual conflicts between venture capitalists (VCs) and entrepreneurs, as well as the possible resolutions of these conflicts.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to examine the inherent and actual conflicts between venture capitalists (VCs) and entrepreneurs, as well as the possible resolutions of these conflicts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper is based on 42 semi‐structured interviews conducted with Israeli VCs and entrepreneurs (14 VCs and 28 entrepreneurs). In addition, quantitative data were collected about VCs' scope of involvement and their perceived portfolio performance.

Findings

It was found that conflict is inherent in VCs and entrepreneurs' relations as both parties have different conceptions of the venture and the contractual arrangements. Actual conflicts were found to be associated with VCs' level of involvement and perceived performance. The findings indicate that VCs' strategic involvement is associated with cognitive conflicts and collaboration, whereas VCs' managerial involvement is associated with managerial replacement and affective conflicts. The findings provide an insight into the dynamic nature of conflicts between VCs and entrepreneurs, suggesting that affective conflicts may sometimes evolve into cognitive mode, as managerial replacement enables both parties to restructure their relations.

Research limitation/implications

The findings call for further examination of interorganizational conflicts involving asymmetry of power and resource dependence. In addition, the findings also call for deeper examination of how coordination mechanisms of interorganizational relations come to be a source of conflict and how such conflicts may vary in different contexts.

Practical implications

The findings of this paper suggest that both VCs and entrepreneurs should establish conflict management mechanisms, such as similar conceptions and a shared vision, to ensure better cooperation.

Originality/value

This paper provides an in‐depth insight into the embeddedness of conflicts in VCs and entrepreneurs' relations. The finding of this study contribute to theory building of VCs and entrepreneurs' conflicts suggesting that VCs' cooperation depends on both parties' ability to resolve inherent and actual conflicts.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Content available

Abstract

Details

Social Ecology in Holistic Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-841-5

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Christoph Dörrenbächer, Heinz Tüselmann, Heinz-Rudolf Meissner and Qi Cao

The purpose of this paper is to develop an analytical framework to categorize the quality of industrial relations in foreign affiliates. Using the case of foreign…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop an analytical framework to categorize the quality of industrial relations in foreign affiliates. Using the case of foreign affiliates in Germany, this paper further explores what factors shape the quality of industrial relations in foreign affiliates.

Design/methodology/approach

Given the scarcity of research on industrial relations in foreign affiliates, this paper is based on conceptual work as well as on a comparative case investigation of 21 foreign affiliates in Germany, involving informants from both labor and management.

Findings

Industrial relations in foreign affiliates in Germany can take four different qualities, based on the following: social partnership; conflict partnership; latently adversarial; and adversarial relations. While previous literature focused on country-of-origin effects, the authors’ case-based investigation further revealed that both affiliate effects and multinational corporation (MNC) effects have a strong impact on the quality of industrial relations in foreign affiliates in Germany.

Originality/value

This paper provides systematic evidence on the presumption that micro-organizational and MNC-specific factors are necessary to gain a deeper understanding of industrial relations in MNCs. Moreover, this paper contributes to the discussion on the quality of industrial relations in foreign affiliates in Germany, by placing results from both single-case studies and management surveys into perspective.

Details

critical perspectives on international business, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-2043

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 2001

Philip J. Moberg

The present study examines the relation of individual differences in personality to one's preferences for approaching and managing conflict in work settings. This…

Abstract

The present study examines the relation of individual differences in personality to one's preferences for approaching and managing conflict in work settings. This investigation offers a conceptual foundation for relating the Five‐Factor Model (FFM) of personality to strategy preference, tests strategy‐FFM dimension hypotheses, and explores strategy relations with narrower FFM midlevel traits. Managers and supervisors (N = 249) from public, governmental, and private sector organizations completed the Organizational Communication and Conflict Instrument and the Revised NEO Personality Inventory. Preferences for conflict strategies were found to relate to distinct patterns of FFM dimensions, while narrower midlevel traits provided meaningful insights into the nature of the observed relations.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Content available
Article
Publication date: 25 November 2019

Ivana Monnard and Krishnamurthy Sriramesh

The purpose of this paper is to link public relations to peacebuilding. Although scholarship has discussed public relations as relationship management, the nexus between…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to link public relations to peacebuilding. Although scholarship has discussed public relations as relationship management, the nexus between public relations and peace building has been understudied. To address this deficiency, this research studies the negotiations between the Government of Colombia and the FARC-EP separatist group that lead to the landmark peace treaty between the two entities that had fought for over five decades with thousands of deaths. Three research questions addressed the communication factors that contributed to the two sworn enemies – FARC-EP and the Colombian Government – finally sealing a peace agreement; the specific public relations strategies and techniques that led to relationship building between the two sides leading to the landmark peace agreement; and the use of the indicators of relationship building proposed by scholarship in the negotiations between the Colombian Government and FARC-EP.

Design/methodology/approach

The case study method was used and a purposive sample of news reports from three national newspapers at specific key dates yielding a final sample consisted of 504 articles was analysed. A codebook with deductive and inductive categories was developed specially to study the existing communication factors (RQ1), public relations strategies and techniques (RQ2), as well as contributions by relationship indicators (RQ3). Given the sensitivity of the issues, only secondary data could be relied upon for this study.

Findings

The results of RQ1 fall within the scope of Grunig’s (2001), Sriramesh’s (1992) and Hung’s (2001) notion of the personal influence model where the leveraging of individuals’ network is important to facilitate communication. Indeed, the relations already existing and established with third parties are revealed to be fundamental to the success of the negotiation process. As for RQ2, findings demonstrate that the Colombian Government used third-party mediation, principled and distributive strategies, while FARC-EP mainly used contending strategies. But results showed that both used compromising during the whole process, and that both transitioned from one-way asymmetrical strategies, such as principled or contending towards compromising along the peace talks. Finally, findings demonstrate evidence of the four indicators of the relationship and their link with public relations techniques. The most evidenced indicators of the relationship were trust, commitment and control mutuality. Trust was the indicator of the relationship the most evidenced in the Colombian case. The dimension was built during the whole process and evolved continually. Distrust was the total between the two enemies at the beginning of the pre-negotiation. However, as parties entered into a relationship, confidence and trust increased.

Research limitations/implications

The inability to obtain primary data is the major limitation of this study. It was caused by the sensitivity of the topic.

Practical implications

This study links public relations to a very practical case that is also vastly understudied/underreported – peacemaking/peacebuilding – while also addressing communication by governments and civil society in Latin America – an area that is largely understudied.

Originality/value

This is the first study that links public relations with peacebuilding.

Details

Corporate Communications: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1356-3289

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2013

Wendy Glaser and Tracy D. Hecht

The purpose of this paper is to examine associations between work‐family conflicts, threat appraisals, self‐efficacy, and emotional exhaustion. Threat appraisal was…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine associations between work‐family conflicts, threat appraisals, self‐efficacy, and emotional exhaustion. Threat appraisal was hypothesized to mediate relations between work‐family conflicts (work‐to‐family and family‐to‐work) and emotional exhaustion. Self‐efficacy was hypothesized to moderate relations between work‐family conflicts and threat appraisal, with relations expected to be weaker for individuals high in self‐efficacy.

Design/methodology/approach

University employees (n=159; 67 percent female) participated in this non‐experimental study. Data were gathered via questionnaire. Two‐thirds of participants completed measures of work‐family conflicts and threat‐appraisal a few weeks prior to completing measures of self‐efficacy and emotional exhaustion; remaining participants completed one cross‐sectional survey.

Findings

Observed relations were consistent with predicted mediation hypotheses. Contrary to predictions, self‐efficacy did not moderate relations between work‐to‐family conflict and threat‐appraisal and the relation between family‐to‐work conflict and threat‐appraisal was stronger for those with higher self‐efficacy. Self‐efficacy was negatively related to emotional exhaustion.

Practical implications

Organizations should foster positive work‐family climates to help alleviate work‐family conflicts. Managers should demonstrate compassion when dealing with employees who have serious family concerns, as even efficacious individuals may find such situations threatening.

Originality/value

This research integrates stress theories with research on the work‐family interface. The relevance of threat appraisal and the role of self‐efficacy are highlighted.

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Adriana Roseli Wünsch Takahashi, Mariane Lemos Lourenço, Josué Alexandre Sander and Carla Patricia da Silva Souza

This study aims to understand how the development of teaching and research competencies affects graduate (MS and PhD level – called stricto sensu courses in Brazil…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to understand how the development of teaching and research competencies affects graduate (MS and PhD level – called stricto sensu courses in Brazil) management professors' work-family relations.

Design/methodology/approach

This research is a case study about work-family conflicts in academic careers. The data collection and analysis occurred during the period between June 2009 and January 2012. The population is composed of 45 professors: 33 men and 12 women, corresponding, respectively, to 73 and 27 per cent of the professors in the programs. Eleven female professors and 26 male professors were interviewed in this research. Analysis of work-family conflicts was performed by means of open questions based on three conflict dimensions: time, strain and behavior.

Findings

Investment in the development of teaching competencies brings conflicts into work-family relations. Among the three conflict dimensions considered, time stood out. When the conflict dimension was analyzed, more specifically in terms of behavior, it was evident that men perceive the effects of work-family conflicts to a lesser extent, as women suffer more from the triple impact (work, family and studies).

Research limitations/implications

Context of a sector within a determined place.

Practical implications

This text highlights the importance and current theme of gender and career for researchers and academy. Thus, this paper contributes so society can reflect on the roles men and women hold in the distribution of the responsibilities, highlighting the importance of balancing their division between couples, in family routines and in childcare. Such balance can improve a family's life, providing better conditions so women can manage their careers.

Social implications

Likewise, this paper supports public policies that improve the life quality of women or those who will adopt children, such as policies that incentive public and private organizations to extend maternity leave for mothers and adoptive couples, and public policies that contribute so women can proceed in their careers and therefore can contribute to the advancement of society and their own bio-psycho-social development. This text also brings implications in order that organizations design policies that allow all employees to better balance work-time and other life activities in general.

Originality/value

By selecting the graduate MS/PhD (stricto sensu) educational sector in particular, it was possible to learn the challenges, difficulties, achievements and limits inherent to the profession (professors), just as it was possible to verify existing conflicts, many times experienced and debated in organizational routines but not identified and shown by academic research in this sector.

Details

Gender in Management: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2413

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 31 December 2003

Tom Kelleher

In April 2001, deadlocked labour negotiations brought all public education in Hawaii to a standstill. This paper reviews theoretical models of public relations and…

Abstract

In April 2001, deadlocked labour negotiations brought all public education in Hawaii to a standstill. This paper reviews theoretical models of public relations and criticism of these models in terms of conflict theory. A case study of the University of Hawaii (UH) faculty strike, including findings from in‐depth interviews with PR professionals, chief negotiators and the press is presented. Although PR models fit well in discussing relationships between the parties and their constituents, findings suggest that PR techniques often were proscribed by the circumstances of collective bargaining, and public relations, as it has been conceptualised in both theory and layman’s terms, was used as an alternative to negotiations between opposing parties rather than a means to resolving the conflict.

Details

Journal of Communication Management, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-254X

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2020

Iris Levin and Kathy Arthurson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the causes, the nature and the extent of unneighbourly relations between neighbours living in small multi-owned residential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the causes, the nature and the extent of unneighbourly relations between neighbours living in small multi-owned residential buildings (MOBs, sometimes called strata) in Australian cities, and the effect of these relations on the health and wellbeing of residents. The impact of neighbour relations and conflicts on residents' health and wellbeing has not been explored before in the context of small MOBs in Australia (under 12 units).

Design/methodology/approach

The research involved an analysis of secondary data on common problems experienced in MOBs between neighbours, in-depth face-to-face interviews with twenty-six residents and interviews with five managers of management agencies in metropolitan Melbourne (Victoria) and Adelaide (South Australia), Australia.

Findings

When strata processes and management worked well residents were positive about living in such an arrangement. However, when the strata group was less harmonious residents reported that it impacted negatively on their health and wellbeing.

Research limitations/implications

The study's findings are subject to the widely acknowledged limitations of small sample-based interview research. Findings indicate that there is a need to explore the benefits and disadvantages of living in small multi-owned residential buildings in Australia on a larger scale.

Practical implications

There are three policy implications from the findings: a need for better education of prospective buyers regarding the nature of strata living; tighter regulation of rules for small multi-owned apartment buildings is required, (in a similar way to how the regulations operate in large apartment buildings); and a need to include private rental tenants living in strata in the everyday life around the management of the building.

Originality/value

The impact of neighbourly relations and conflicts on the health and wellbeing of residents living in MOBs, particularly small ones, has not been studied adequately, as current research focuses on large apartment buildings. This research addresses a gap in the literature in the study of small living arrangements (town houses, apartment buildings, terraces), with 12 or less apartments, with a focus on residents' health and wellbeing.

Details

Property Management, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-7472

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 72000