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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2013

Biju Varkkey and Randhir Kumar

The Indian diamond cutting and polishing (CPD) industry enjoys a global leadership position, but at the same time is vulnerable to economic shifts in the global market…

Abstract

Purpose

The Indian diamond cutting and polishing (CPD) industry enjoys a global leadership position, but at the same time is vulnerable to economic shifts in the global market. Historically, such shocks have resulted in shake down of the industry, including closures, bankruptcies, job losses and labour unrest. Most recently, the vulnerability was experienced during the economic recession of 2008, which impacted both entrepreneurs and diamond workers alike. The shock elicited different adaptation strategies from individual firms. The paper aims to understand the adaptation strategies of large and formally organized diamond enterprises in Surat, India, with particular reference to “labour hoarding” as a strategy for workforce management.

Design/methodology/approach

Using case studies of four large CPD firms, the paper investigates patterns in managerial decision making pertaining to workforce management and adaptation strategies taken during recession. The authors also traced the subject companies' performance post‐recession. The tool used for data collection was semi‐structured, in‐depth interviews with entrepreneurs and human resource managers. For additional inputs and triangulation of findings, content analysis of news reports, along with interactions with several knowledgeable persons from both industry and government, were conducted.

Findings

The authors' study of the sample firms neither supports the popular notion of “workforce retention by large diamond enterprises, in spite of recession” nor the generalized statements about “massive lay‐offs by all”, as reported in popular media. The authors found that, due to recessionary pressure, there was a deep managerial dilemma in the companies about how to strike the right trade‐off between workforce retention (labour hoarding) and downsizing. The paper argues that, post‐recession, the companies whose decisions were pro‐labour retention (hoarding) oriented were able to come back in business stronger and perform better.

Originality/value

The diamond industry of India is ethno‐bound in its functioning, where community and regional/linguistic affiliations of both workers and entrepreneurs traditionally played a vital role. Therefore, the employee management practices adopted do not strictly fall within the general realm of western management practices or popular HRM frameworks. The study shows that context‐dependent employee management strategies, suiting the need for maintaining the traditional ethno‐bound values even during recessionary pressure, created long‐term positive effects for the firm.

Details

International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Abstract

Details

Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 25 no. 2/3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2014

Parvaneh Rabiee and Caroline Glendinning

The purpose of this paper is to report the experiences of older people who use council-managed personal budgets (PBs) to fund home care services and their satisfaction…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report the experiences of older people who use council-managed personal budgets (PBs) to fund home care services and their satisfaction with the level of choice and control they are able to exercise.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 18 older people from eight home care agencies across three councils in England. All interviews were semi-structured and face-to-face.

Findings

Despite some optimism about improvements in choice and flexibility experienced by older people using home care services, the findings from this small study suggest that the gap between the “ideal” of user choice and the “reality” of practice continues to be significant. The level of choice and control older people felt able to exercise to tailor home care services to their personal needs and preferences was restricted to low level choices. Other choices were constrained by the low levels of older people's PBs and council restrictions on what PBs can be spent on. Older people's understanding of limitations in public funding/pressures on agencies and their reluctance to play an active consumer role including willingness to “exit” from unsatisfactory care arrangements appeared to further challenge the potential for achieving greater choice and control through council-managed PBs.

Originality/value

The English government's policy emphasis on personalisation of care and support and new organisational arrangements for managed PBs aim to promote user choice and control. This is the first study to report the experiences of older people using managed PBs under these new arrangements. The paper highlights areas of interests and concerns that social care staff, support planners and commissioners may need to consider.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1982

Robert W. Hollmann

A recent article by P.B. Beaumont focused attention on the problem of alcoholism in British industry. Beaumont discussed the need for organisations to have policies for…

Abstract

A recent article by P.B. Beaumont focused attention on the problem of alcoholism in British industry. Beaumont discussed the need for organisations to have policies for dealing with employee alcoholism and he identified a number of factors likely to be associated with successful policies. The article was quite stimulating and, accordingly, I thought it would be instructive to describe what American organisations are doing with respect not only to employee alcoholism but also the problems of drug and other emotional difficulties affecting job performance. Specifically, this article is devoted to a more thorough description of american employee assistance programmes and a discussion of some of the factors that have been found important to their successful implementation. Hopefully this information could be helpful to British as well as other American firms that continue to grapple with these kinds of problems.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Executive summary
Publication date: 19 September 2018

TURKEY: Police will watch builders at Istanbul airport

Details

DOI: 10.1108/OXAN-ES238625

ISSN: 2633-304X

Keywords

Geographic
Topical
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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1985

Eugene F. Finkin

A successful company turnaround usually requires implementing significant changes in how a business is run. “Business as usual” does not suffice—that is what places the…

Abstract

A successful company turnaround usually requires implementing significant changes in how a business is run. “Business as usual” does not suffice—that is what places the company in mortal jeopardy in the first place.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 5 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

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Book part
Publication date: 15 July 2009

Peter Bamberger

Although employee helping behaviors have been widely examined by organizational and human resource management scholars, relatively little is known about the antecedents…

Abstract

Although employee helping behaviors have been widely examined by organizational and human resource management scholars, relatively little is known about the antecedents and consequences of help-seeking in the workplace. Seeking to fill this gap, I draw from the social and counseling psychology literatures, as well as from research in epidemiology and health sociology to first conceptualize the notion of employee help-seeking and then to identify the variables and mechanisms potentially driving such behavior in work organizations. My critical review of this literature suggests that the application of existing models of help-seeking may offer limited predictive utility when applied to the workplace unless help-seeking is conceived as the outcome of a multi-level process. That in mind, I propose a model of employee help-seeking that takes into account the potential direct and cross-level moderating effects of a variety of situational factors (e.g., the nature of the particular problem, organizational norms, support climate) that might have differential influences on help-seeking behavior depending on the particular phase of the help-seeking process examined. Following this, I focus on two sets of help-seeking outcomes, namely, the implications of employee help-seeking on individual and group performance, and the impact of help-seeking on employee well-being. The chapter concludes with a brief examination of some of the more critical issues in employee help-seeking that remain to be explored (e.g., the timing of help solicitation) as well as the methodological challenges likely to be faced by those seeking to engage in such exploration.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-056-8

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 1955

Maurice Holt

INVESTIGATIONS into the nature of high speed flow have now been in progress alto‐gether for thirty years, and at a particularly intensive rate during the past ten years…

Abstract

INVESTIGATIONS into the nature of high speed flow have now been in progress alto‐gether for thirty years, and at a particularly intensive rate during the past ten years. Many of the problems which troubled early workers have now been solved, certain methods of treatment have been developed to a high degree and interest has shifted to new types of problem and new techniques. A stage has been reached when it is appropriate to review the progress made and to point out those fields which remain to be examined. In this and succeeding articles advances in a number of branches of the subject are described. The account is by no means comprehensive and has been limited to those fields in which work remains to be done, which bear some relation to aircraft or rocket design and of which, at the same time, the author has some direct experience, however limited.

Details

Aircraft Engineering and Aerospace Technology, vol. 27 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0002-2667

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Book part
Publication date: 1 January 2006

David Metcalf and Jianwei Li

China has, apparently, more trade union members than the rest of the world put together, but the unions are subservient to the Party-state. The theme of the paper is the…

Abstract

China has, apparently, more trade union members than the rest of the world put together, but the unions are subservient to the Party-state. The theme of the paper is the gap between rhetoric and reality. Issues analysed include union structure, membership, representation, and the interaction between unions and the Party-state. We suggest that Chinese unions inhabit an Alice in Wonderland dream world and that they are virtually impotent when it comes to representing workers. Because the Party-state recognises that such frailty may lead to instability it has passed new laws promoting collective contracts and established new tripartite institutions to mediate and arbitrate disputes. While such laws are welcome they are largely hollow: collective contracts are very different from collective bargaining and the incidence of cases dealt with by the tripartite institutions is tiny. Much supporting evidence is presented drawing on detailed case studies undertaken in Hainan Province (the largest and one of the oldest special economic zones) in 2004 and 2005. The need for more effective representation is appreciated by some All China Federation of Trade Unions (ACFTU) officials, but it seems a long way off, so unions in China will continue to echo the White Queen: “The rule is, jam tomorrow and jam yesterday – but never jam today” and, alas, tomorrow never comes.

Details

Advances in Industrial & Labor Relations
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-470-6

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

John R. Berridge

Reviews the differences between employee assistance programmes (EAPs) in the USA and the UK, but also identifies convergent trends in the employment environment in both…

Abstract

Reviews the differences between employee assistance programmes (EAPs) in the USA and the UK, but also identifies convergent trends in the employment environment in both countries. Discusses recent developments for professional EAPs in the USA to be driven by occupational social work models, and for the interests of the employer to be taken more fully into account. Evaluates the extent to which these models represent a source of complexity and friction with the personnel management and trade union interests: in this respect, considers especially issues of confidentiality in the counselling relationship and potential conflict with the management advisory and consultancy role being advocated for EAPs. Concludes by suggesting that EAPs in the UK should reaffirm their basic values of individual confidential counselling, even if this stance does not always assure for them a high status or harmonious role.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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