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Article

Sarah Gibson

There is an increased focus on making prison cultures more rehabilitative, with clear evidence that certain environmental characteristics contribute towards…

Abstract

Purpose

There is an increased focus on making prison cultures more rehabilitative, with clear evidence that certain environmental characteristics contribute towards rehabilitation. To date, limited research has explored the rehabilitative culture in a high security prison. This study aims to measure staff and prisoner ratings of social climate and their levels of hope in such an establishment.

Design/methodology/approach

The research adopted a quantitative approach, using the EssenCES and State Hope Scale. Data was analysed using parametric and non-parametric tests to explore correlations/relationships between variables.

Findings

Findings indicated that higher ratings of social climate were associated with higher levels of hope. Staff rated the social climate more favourably than prisoners, and Category B prisoners had higher levels of hope than Category A prisoners. No significant correlation was found between length of time in service or custody and ratings of social climate or hope.

Practical implications

This paper highlights the importance of developing a positive social climate and hope, supporting the rehabilitative culture initiatives.

Originality/value

This paper contributes to the limited literature on social climate and hope within UK forensic settings. Furthermore, reliability testing indicates the State Hope Scale is appropriate for use with a UK forensic population, extending its application.

Details

The Journal of Forensic Practice, vol. 23 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-8794

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Article

Kayode A. Alao and Olusegun F. Adebowale

The purpose of this paper was to examine the attitudes of prison inmates and warders (prison staff) to rehabilitative counselling and its relationship to their prison…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine the attitudes of prison inmates and warders (prison staff) to rehabilitative counselling and its relationship to their prison status on one hand and their educational attainment on the other.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a descriptive survey research design. In all 123 prison inmates and 110 warders were selected by stratified random sampling from Osogbo prison headquarters, as well as Ilesa and Ile-Ife prisons in southwestern Nigeria. Data were collected through a self-constructed questionnaire titled “inmate and prison staff attitude to rehabilitation counselling”. Data collected were analysed using percentages and χ2 statistics.

Findings

The results showed that the prison inmates and staff possessed positive attitude to rehabilitative counselling. No significant difference was found between the attitudes of prison inmates and staff members or on the basis of their prison statuses. However, the study found a significant relationship between the prison inmates’ attitude to rehabilitative counselling and their educational attainment.

Research limitations/implications

Statutory provision needs be made for professional rehabilitative counselling in Nigerian prisons in contrast to the religious instructions currently being allowed prisoners. Educational opportunities should be provided to ensure that the knowledge so obtained complements the rehabilitative counselling.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the attitude towards rehabilitative counselling.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

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Article

Sandra C. Buttigieg, Vincent Cassar and Judy W. Scully

The following case study aims to explore management's, health professionals' and patients' experiences on the extent to which there is visibility of management support in…

Abstract

Purpose

The following case study aims to explore management's, health professionals' and patients' experiences on the extent to which there is visibility of management support in achieving effective interdisciplinary team working, which is explicitly declared in the mission statement of a 60-bed acute rehabilitative geriatric hospital in Malta.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted with the above-mentioned key stakeholders.

Findings

Three main distinct yet interdependent themes emerged as a result of thematic analysis: “managing a team-friendly hospital”, “interdisciplinary team components”, and “interdisciplinary team processes”. The findings show that visibility of management support and its alignment with the process and content levels of interdisciplinary teamwork are key to integrated care for acute rehabilitative geriatric patients.

Research limitations/implications

The emerging phenomena may not be reproducible in a different context; although many of the emerging themes could be comfortably matched with the existing literature.

Practical implications

The implications are geared towards raising the consciousness and conscientiousness of good practice in interdisciplinary teamwork in hospitals, as well as in emphasizing organizational and management support as crucial factors for team-based organizations.

Social implications

Interdisciplinary teamwork in acute rehabilitative geriatrics provides optimal quality and integrated health care delivery with the aim that the older persons are successfully discharged back to the community.

Originality/value

The authors draw on solid theoretical frameworks – the complexity theory, team effectiveness model and the social identity theory – to support their major finding, namely the alignment of organizational and management support with intra-team factors at the process and content level.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article

Ferid Azemi

This study aims to focus on understanding the prison environment, inmates’ behavior and perceptions of the prison environment, analyzing the degree of awareness…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to focus on understanding the prison environment, inmates’ behavior and perceptions of the prison environment, analyzing the degree of awareness, rehabilitation and the programs that apply to prisons in both countries. It is assumed that the data that emerge from this research will contribute to a better understanding of the prisoner’s world of their perception about the prison environment in Kosovo and Finland. The study focused on inmates’ perception about the prison environment and their attitudes toward their sentences.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative study through in-depth interviews.

Findings

The results of this study indicated that inmates in Kosovo perceived the prison environment in a very negative light. The main reasons for this were the dissatisfaction with their status of being inmates and also lack of an appropriate classification of inmates. However, even though inmates in Finland perceived prison environment in a positive light, they still think that more educative programs are needed.

Practical implications

The results of this study indicated that Kosovo Correctional Service should implement more rehabilitative programs and improve its classification system. Criminal Sanction Agency in Finland as per results should increase efforts for implementation of new programs and aftercare action plans.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, it is the first research on inmates in two countries Kosovo and Finland, and this added new knowledge to the existing information about the prison environment in Kosovo and Finland. The results of this research gave an idea to respective institutions to add new rehabilitative and aftercare programs.

Details

Journal of Criminological Research, Policy and Practice, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-3841

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Article

Tessa Trappes‐Lomax and Annie Hawton

This paper aims to report verbatim the voices of older people describing their experiences of rehabilitation services in community hospitals and local authority short‐term…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to report verbatim the voices of older people describing their experiences of rehabilitation services in community hospitals and local authority short‐term residential units followed by “usual care” services at home. It aims to contribute directly to the implementation of the DH Section 256 “reablement guidance”.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper is a qualitative study, based on semi‐structured face‐to‐face interviews in 2002/3, with 42 participants (mean age 81.4 years) using interpretative phenomenological analysis (IPA).

Findings

Four main themes emerged from users' comments: the complexity of rehabilitative need, the influence of the setting, the role of the staff and the availability of reablement support back at home.

Research limitations/implications

Qualitative studies have limited generalisability, but these findings are consistent both with other studies of user experience and with earlier related evidence about assessment, institutionalisation and psychological factors.

Practical implications

The findings clearly demonstrate changing rehabilitative needs along the care pathway, with implications for commissioners and providers of reablement services. The findings bring a user perspective to current debates about the integration of services and the use of pooled budgets.

Originality/value

Effective reablement is critically dependent on service users' co‐operation and motivation. It therefore needs to be highly responsive to their needs and views. This study offers specific user views about their experiences in different settings and at different stages of reablement, together with their ideas for how it might work better. The data are analysed within a single framework, offering an example of the type of local evaluation currently sought by the Department of Health.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Garuth Chalfont

Rehabilitation aims to achieve optimal levels of physical, psychological, social and vocational well‐being. Even though cognitive interventions have been widely applied in…

Abstract

Purpose

Rehabilitation aims to achieve optimal levels of physical, psychological, social and vocational well‐being. Even though cognitive interventions have been widely applied in dementia care for over 20 years, rehabilitation is largely ignored for degenerative diseases. The purpose of this paper is to present a case study to illustrate environmental design in rehabilitation for people with dementia.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper gives an overview of environmental design in rehabilitation for dementia, using the case study of Charnley Fold enhanced day care. It highlights key points contributing to the success of this practice model, outcomes achieved and arguments for rehabilitative dementia care.

Findings

This model of enhanced day care uses nature as a therapeutic tool and a powerful resource to facilitate the rehabilitative process. It achieves this through the design of the physical environment which maximizes a person's participation with others and the natural world, resulting in outcomes such as confidence, enthusiasm, motivation, re‐skilling, communication and mobility.

Originality/value

The paper highlights key points contributing to the success of this practice model, outcomes achieved and arguments for rehabilitative dementia care.

Details

Social Care and Neurodisability, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-0919

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Article

David McNally and Louise Hardwick

This article describes efforts to develop a joint health and social services strategy for rehabilitation in one local authority area in response to national policy. It…

Abstract

This article describes efforts to develop a joint health and social services strategy for rehabilitation in one local authority area in response to national policy. It notes the effects of competing policy initiatives, of the shift in hospital provision to providing only acute care, and of failure to agree joint responsibility for the future development of such services.

Details

Journal of Integrated Care, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1476-9018

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Article

Gill Walker and Fiona Poland

The importance of developing intermediate care options for older people is gaining increasing prominence in the UK with the promotion of new health and social care…

Abstract

The importance of developing intermediate care options for older people is gaining increasing prominence in the UK with the promotion of new health and social care partnerships. Consequent changes in practice and values are demanded from staff. An action research approach provides a process of generating information linked to dialogues which facilitate such changes. This article draws on a case study of nursing staff working with older people in a newly‐defined rehabilitation setting in a Welsh community hospital. The action research cycle reported, focused on a series of collaborative interventions aimed at bringing about such changes in thinking and practice from a ‘doing for’ to an ‘enabling’ rehabilitative style of nursing. Three questionnaires and a round of group interviews were successively undertaken with a group of 49 staff, with planning and discussion sessions taking place between each data collection round. The process highlighted differing assumptions between different grades of nursing staff and between nurses and therapists about the nature of the rehabilitative process and how far it could be integrated with nursing care. The article discusses how the action research process supported a shared change in perspective that progress needed to be made to work in an integrated rehabilitative way. Participative approaches, such as action research, should be drawn on if the positive and cost‐effective benefits of rehabilitation for older people are to be more actively realised.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Book part

Rose Ricciardelli, Hayley Crichton and Lisa Adams

In this chapter, we explicate the evolution of Canadian corrections, the political, social and judicial realities that have shaped punishment and imprisonment over…

Abstract

Purpose

In this chapter, we explicate the evolution of Canadian corrections, the political, social and judicial realities that have shaped punishment and imprisonment over history. We reveal how such factors continue to leave their mark on the current Canadian federal criminal justice system and its structures of incarceration.

Design/methodology/approach

A comprehensive review of accessible literatures detailing the nation’s development of punishment and incarceration is presented. The history of imprisonment is traced up to the current year and the role of penal populism as theorized by Garland (2001) and, later, Pratt (2007) is presented to discern the motivations for the current punitive correctional rhetoric, as well as its impact on conditions of confinement and program implementation in penitentiaries.

Findings

Canada’s correctional history is largely shaped by how punishment is defined and how such definitions are influenced by members of society; including victims, perpetrators, politicians and media personalities. The realities of current conditions of confinement have been impacted by social and political pressures that encourage increasingly punitive policies oriented towards ‘tough on crime’ initiatives. Current corrections are characterized by overcrowding, concerns about rehabilitative programming and resource allocation and mental health care.

Originality/value

Recent legislative amendments have solidified a ‘tough on crime’ agenda in Canada, however the process underlying the movement towards the acceptance, even public demand, for such legislative changes remain in need of dissemination; particularly in light of the decades of decreasing crime rates in the country.

Details

Punishment and Incarceration: A Global Perspective
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-907-2

Keywords

Content available
Article

Andrew Toyin Olagunju, Dapo Adebowale Adegbaju and Richard Uwakwe

Evidence-based rehabilitative treatment is constrained due to limited knowledge about disability and its related factors among individuals with schizophrenia across West…

Abstract

Evidence-based rehabilitative treatment is constrained due to limited knowledge about disability and its related factors among individuals with schizophrenia across West Africa. This study aims to investigate the pattern of disability, and the associated factors among individuals with schizophrenia. One hundred consecutively recruited consenting participants were subjected to designed questionnaire to inquire about their demographic and illness-related variables. This was followed by the administration of Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV-TR Axis I Disorders and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale to confirm the diagnosis of schizophrenia and rate severity of symptoms respectively in them. In addition, the World Health Organisation Disability Assessment Scale II (WHODAS-II) was used to assess for disability in all participants. Different degrees of disability based on WHODAS-II mean score of 27.02±3.49 were noted among individuals with schizophrenia, and affectation of domains of disability like self care, getting along with others, life activities and participation in the society among others were observed. In addition, high level of disability was significantly associated with younger adults in the age group 18-44 years (P=0.007), unemployment status (P=0.003), remittance source of income (P=0.034) and ethnicity (P=0.017); conversely, less number of children (P=0.033), less amount spent on treatment (P<0.001) and lower BPRS score (P<0.001) correlated negatively with high level of disability. In spite of clinical stability following treatment, individuals with schizophrenia were disabled to varied degrees, and socioeconomic as well as illness-related factors constituted important correlates. Integration of rehabilitation along with social intervention into treatment design to reduce disability is implied, and further research is also warranted.

Details

Mental Illness, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2036-7465

Keywords

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