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Article

Mette Sandoff and Gill Widell

The purpose of this study is to put forward examples of disciplinary practices, i.e. to interpret Foucault's ideas with data collected from today's working‐life in schools…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to put forward examples of disciplinary practices, i.e. to interpret Foucault's ideas with data collected from today's working‐life in schools and prisons. Besides describing disciplinary practices the intention is to describe how individuals cope with the dilemmas that follow. On the grounds of the analysis a discussion about the tension between freedom and docility and different individuals’ strategies for coping with this tension is also promoted.

Design/methodology/approach

Data are collected from teachers in schools and warders in prisons. The empirical question relates to how disciplinary practises are expressed and the dilemmas that follow. In the analysis the concepts of Foucault, time, space and visibility, as relations of power, are used.

Findings

The article shows examples of disciplining and the dilemmas following from disciplining, both at individual and organisational level. Encountering new demands in their work, teachers tend to stick harder to their profession while warders tend to freely use their life experiences to develop their work. One conclusion is that freedom may be easier when individual values and organisational values are in coherence with one another, and docility is more often used when they differ.

Originality/value

That there are tensions between individuals’ striving for freedom and organisations’ striving for their disciplining is no news but on the grounds of the empirical data dilemmas and how teachers and warders cope with them in their work are described. The data also encourage further discussion while it brings findings of different ways of coping, for example when it comes to professionals and non‐professionals.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 28 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article

Tony James Brady

The purpose of this paper is to examine the education of children at St Helena Penal Establishment in Queensland and the trials faced by the educators that delivered their…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the education of children at St Helena Penal Establishment in Queensland and the trials faced by the educators that delivered their formal schooling. The paper will add to the growing research into the prison island and will provide an insight into a unique facet of education in the newly established Australian State of Queensland.

Design/methodology/approach

The historical analysis draws on original documents and published works to chronicle the provision of education to the children of warders at the St Helena Penal Establishment.

Findings

The establishment of the Department of Public Instruction and the introduction of the State Education Act of 1875 were intended to provide Queensland children from 6 to 12 years of age with free, compulsory, and secular primary education. The full implementation of the Act took until 1900, and in the process, initiatives like St Helena State School No. 12, through issues of administrative control, saw teachers excluded from the Department of Public Instruction in order to include schoolchildren under the auspices of the same department.

Research limitations/implications

The research paper is an initial investigation into the subject and limited by the paucity of primary data available on the topic.

Originality/value

The case study adds to the growing literature on other aspects of the prison at St Helena, Queensland and adds to knowledge of life on the island. Furthermore, the aspects of control over staff on the island and the requirement for the teachers to double as guards, ready to take up arms in defence of the prison, provides new insights into the obligations placed on some early educators.

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Article

Kayode A. Alao and Olusegun F. Adebowale

The purpose of this paper was to examine the attitudes of prison inmates and warders (prison staff) to rehabilitative counselling and its relationship to their prison…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper was to examine the attitudes of prison inmates and warders (prison staff) to rehabilitative counselling and its relationship to their prison status on one hand and their educational attainment on the other.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a descriptive survey research design. In all 123 prison inmates and 110 warders were selected by stratified random sampling from Osogbo prison headquarters, as well as Ilesa and Ile-Ife prisons in southwestern Nigeria. Data were collected through a self-constructed questionnaire titled “inmate and prison staff attitude to rehabilitation counselling”. Data collected were analysed using percentages and χ2 statistics.

Findings

The results showed that the prison inmates and staff possessed positive attitude to rehabilitative counselling. No significant difference was found between the attitudes of prison inmates and staff members or on the basis of their prison statuses. However, the study found a significant relationship between the prison inmates’ attitude to rehabilitative counselling and their educational attainment.

Research limitations/implications

Statutory provision needs be made for professional rehabilitative counselling in Nigerian prisons in contrast to the religious instructions currently being allowed prisoners. Educational opportunities should be provided to ensure that the knowledge so obtained complements the rehabilitative counselling.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils an identified need to study the attitude towards rehabilitative counselling.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article

Mette Sandoff and Gill Widell

The purpose of this paper is to suggest a frame of reference about the relations between the responsibility and the commitment of employees on the one side and type of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to suggest a frame of reference about the relations between the responsibility and the commitment of employees on the one side and type of organization on the other. The basis is a discussion of the tension between docility and freedom.

Design/methodology/approach

Results from earlier empirical studies of disciplinary practices among teachers and warders form the starting point. In this paper the phenomenon of hedonism is added. Hedonism is investigated from a psychological perspective and applied to work organizations with the help of attribution theories, theories on coping and motivation and theories on the conflict between the individual and the organization, i.e. of power, culture and coherence.

Findings

The paper has developed a typology on coping strategies in work contexts, which describes four possible “ideal” roles an individual can take, referring to three dimensions, the dichotomy between freedom and docility, the individual's locus of control as external or internal, and the coherence between individual and organizational values.

Practical implications

The model can be used for empirical studies and contribute to the development of work organizations where people feel committed enough to take responsibility both for monotonous and dull everyday tasks and for exceptional and acute unique problem solving situations.

Originality/value

Most studies on disciplining and docility focus on the painful side of coping. Few studies focus on what people do in order to cope with commitment and responsibility. This paper considers the different power struggles embedded in the work context, and give varying interpretations of them.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 29 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

Keywords

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Article

Maria Niełaczna

This paper aims to explain the phenomenon of low incidence of COVID-19 in Polish prisons. This paper addresses three questions: was the Polish prison system ready to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explain the phenomenon of low incidence of COVID-19 in Polish prisons. This paper addresses three questions: was the Polish prison system ready to respond to the threats posed by COVID-19; what action has it taken in this regard; and with what effect?

Design/methodology/approach

An analysis of the current condition of the Polish prison system was undertaken focusing on items that were the focus of prisoners’ complaints, the interventions of the Ombudsman and the bulletins of the Central Board of the Prison Service. This analysis has been juxtaposed with the opinions of experts in epidemiology and medicine and changes introduced in the law relating to prisoners.

Findings

During the COVID-19 epidemic – despite serious chronic problems in the Polish penitentiary system – the statistics indicated that 24 individuals were infected and no deaths occurred. When compared to the statistics of non-prison cases, this result is extremely low.

Research limitations/implications

Given the newness of the problem, the conflicts of different interests, the “double” isolation of prisons (penal and epidemiological) and the reluctance of the prison administration to provide information about what is happening behind prison walls, researchers must rely on statistics and subjective contacts with prisoners, for example, by investigating their complaints.

Practical implications

As a result of the research, the author believes that the transparency of institutions such as prisons should be ensured, primarily expressed in the provision of information to both prisoners and the public relating to methods adopted to prevent epidemics in the context of prison and prisoners.

Originality/value

The value of this paper is to show how prisons have managed in a new, exceptional situation to balance the right to health and personal safety of prisoners and warders, with the right to contact with the outside world and humane living conditions in a closed and doubly isolated space. The findings presented will add value to the knowledge and effectiveness of the prison administration’s reaction and response to an emergency such as an epidemic.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article

Hyunsook Kim, Eun‐Young Rhee and Jaeyeol Yee

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the “fashion process” by exploring and comparing fashion‐process networks and friendship networks in small…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to gain a better understanding of the “fashion process” by exploring and comparing fashion‐process networks and friendship networks in small groups of adolescents, and to explore the factors involved in the causation of “clothing leadership” and “popularity” in such groups.

Design/methodology/approach

Fashion‐process networks and friendship networks are investigated by sociometric nomination with respect to “clothing acceptance” and “social acceptance” in three age groups of Korean adolescents. The patterns and structures of the networks are analyzed using UCINET 6.0 and Netminer 2.6. Certain factors contributing to “clothing leadership” and “popularity” are measured using Likert‐type scales; these include “clothing interest,” “fashion interest,” and “perceived clothing acceptance.” Other factors of interest (such as “academic grade,” “facial attractiveness,” and “bodily attractiveness”) are rated by peer informants.

Findings

Fashion‐process networks are found to be more centralized and polarized than friendship networks. Clothing acceptance is related to peer acceptance and is found to occur within and across friendship links. Clothing leaders are not necessarily the most popular subjects. The most significant factor determining “clothing leadership” is found to be “facial attractiveness.”

Research limitations/implications

Social network analysis is exploratory in nature and the results cannot be statistically verified. However, a better understanding of the characteristics of fashion‐process networks in small groups assists in bridging the gap between individual adoption of fashion at the micro‐level and fashion diffusion in society at the macro‐level.

Practical implications

By illuminating the dynamics of the fashion process in small groups, the study is of assistance in developing marketing strategies that target adolescents.

Originality/value

The study is original in that fashion process in small groups of Korean adolescents is investigated by social network analysis of “clothing acceptance,” and then compared to friendship networks.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article

Nantaga Sawasdipanich, Supa Puektes, Supaporn Wannasuntad, Ankana Sriyaporn, Chulepon Chawmathagit, Jirapa Sintunava and Gamjad Paungsawad

The purpose of this paper is to develop and evaluate the Standards of Healthcare Facility for Thai Female Inmates (SHF-TFI) through healthcare service improvement.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop and evaluate the Standards of Healthcare Facility for Thai Female Inmates (SHF-TFI) through healthcare service improvement.

Design/methodology/approach

This research and quality improvement project was comprised of three phases. Surveying healthcare facilities and in-depth interviews with female inmates as well as prison nurses were employed in Phase I. Expert reviews and public hearing meetings were used for developing the SHF-TFI in Phase II. Satisfaction questionnaires, focus group interviews of the female inmates, and in-depth interviews with nurses and prison wardens were utilized to evaluate feasibility and effectiveness of SHF-TFI implementation in Phase III.

Findings

The SHF-TFI was elaborated in order to be more specific to the context of the correctional institutes and correspond with healthcare as to the needs of female inmates. It was divided into three main aspects: administrative standards, health service standards and outcome standards. After implementation, nurses reflected on the feasibility and benefits of the SHF-TFI on the organizations, inmates and nurses. The female inmates perceived remarkable improvement in the healthcare services including physical activity promotion and screening programs for non-communicable diseases, the physical environment and sufficiency of medical equipment. Moreover, the pregnant inmates and incarcerated mothers with children shared their views on better antenatal and child developmental care, as well as availability of baby supplies.

Originality/value

The findings support the feasibility and effectiveness of the SHF-TFI for quality care improvement and applicability of the Bangkok Rules in women’s correctional institutes.

Details

International Journal of Prisoner Health, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1744-9200

Keywords

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Article

John Black

The first privatized penal establishment was commissioned in earlyApril 1992, The Wolds Remand Prison, Humberside. In April 1993 it isproposed to restructure HM Prison…

Abstract

The first privatized penal establishment was commissioned in early April 1992, The Wolds Remand Prison, Humberside. In April 1993 it is proposed to restructure HM Prison Service as a government agency, rather than a government department. These policies are not new. In fact it is a repeat of history, and the Prison Service will be established as a dual system, as it was prior to the 1877 Prisons Act. Government accountability and control may be removed from the Home Office. A privatized prison may be run in the name of its shareholders, and not in the name of Her Majesty The Queen – hence the title of this article. Argues that privatization will not decrease overcrowding, but encourage it, along with potential corruption.

Details

International Journal of Public Sector Management, vol. 5 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3558

Keywords

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Abstract

Purpose

To look at what we do, as hosts.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper looks at what we do as hosts, what it means to lead and leadership as engagement.

Findings

Host leadership offers an alternative. Leadership seems to put the focus on the leader. The authors think this is a mistake. Leading is about a relationship – between the leader and the others.

Originality/value

Host leadership is a natural way to take a leading position, in a manner that draws in others. This builds engagement, leading to performance and results.

Details

Development and Learning in Organizations: An International Journal, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7282

Keywords

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Article

Lila Le Trividic Harrache

Drawing on part of a French doctorate research journey, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate how an initial research design gets to be questioned and deconstructed…

Abstract

Purpose

Drawing on part of a French doctorate research journey, the purpose of this paper is to illustrate how an initial research design gets to be questioned and deconstructed when confronted to fieldwork.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reflects on the second year of the doctoral project when the theoretical research object that had been built during the first year was confronted to fieldwork, driving the author to reshape the initial research question.

Findings

The paper explains how doing ethnographic work helped the author to deconstruct the author’s own theoretical and epistemological assumptions. The author started to investigate on the uses of pupils’ “mental suffering” in French upper secondary schools and administration in order to understand the labelling process. The author explains how fieldwork, writing and peer-reviewing made the author realise that the author was not focussing on the appropriate categories. Throughout the reflection, the paper highlights the epistemological shift that this journey reveals.

Originality/value

This paper aims to contribute to methodological debates scrutinising the black box of the research process. It aims to be helpful to those experiencing for the first time the chaos of reformulating the research object.

Details

Journal of Organizational Ethnography, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2046-6749

Keywords

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