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Case study
Publication date: 19 June 2017

Sumit Mishra, Shashi Kant, Vinay Sharma and Rajat Agrawal

Industrial Relations and People Management.

Abstract

Subject area

Industrial Relations and People Management.

Study level/applicability

Graduate or Postgraduate level, Executive working in manufacturing sector.

Case overview

This case highlights the industrial relation issues in a public sector undertaking, a government-owned company in India. The case depicted the issues taken place in the company in the year 2015-2016. The primary data were collected by a working professional, who dealt with and was involved in the scenarios discussed in the case. Other modes such as in-depth interviews were also taken as per requirements. This case also highlights the importance of roles of unions and association in these organizations. Factors which are important to maintain industrial harmony were analyzed and their perspective with respect to production loss were addressed.

Expected learning outcomes

Every employee must be dealt with in a dignified manner with rationale. Hierarchy is required to be in place but doesn’t need to be authoritative. Be communicative and transparent while taking action. There should be no compromise on indiscipline at workplace and decision to be taken accordingly. Manage conflict by involving all the concerned authorities from outset. The analysis of the case shows that if the rationale was followed while managing the people it will lead to industrial harmony. Role of trade unions and association will prove beneficial as they will become a part of creating a solution in the matter of discords, ensuring growth for the company and its employees. It is important to mention here that the case was developed on the basis of the first-hand experience of the author.

Supplementary materials

Teaching notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 6: Human Resource Management.

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Case study
Publication date: 17 October 2012

K. Srinivasa Reddy, Rajat Agrawal and Vinay Kumar Nangia

International business – sell-off and joint venture.

Abstract

Subject area

International business – sell-off and joint venture.

Study level/applicability

This case is suitable for graduation and post graduation (BBA, MBA) and other management programs. The courses include multinational business environment and strategic management

Case overview

A significant increase in the Asian electronics business has created a global platform for international vendors and customers. Indeed, Chinese and Korean firms have become the foremost manufacturing and fabrication nucleus for electronic supplies in the world economy. In fact, it is an example of success from Asian emerging markets. This case presents the strategies of Asian rivals in the electronics business that shows both Bolipps and Canssonic redesigning and restructuring global tactics for long-term sustainable success in the given market. It also discusses the reasons behind their current mode of business and post-deal issues.

Expected learning outcomes

The case describes a way to impart managerial and leadership strategies from regular business operations happening in and around the world. Solely it focuses on designing inorganic choices such as sell-offs, joint ventures, shuffle and merging strategies through theory to application.

Supplementary materials

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Abstract

Subject area

Market development.

Study level/applicability

This case is intended to be used in strategic management, operations management for both undergraduate and graduate courses. It can also be used for value innovation and market development.

Case overview

This case focuses on market development by Patanjali, a fast-growing organization crossing US$1bn of sales in five years of time span and declaring a target of doubling this figure in the financial year 2016-2017 (to reach US$1,500m). The prime focus of Patanjali is the health food segment based on herbal and Ayurveda science through the use of organically grown agricultural produce by integrating the associated value chains while radically benefitting all the stakeholders in a two-way process as suppliers as well as buyers/consumers. The fundamental context of the case is associated with the value chain development in terms of value addition on the basis of the organizational and leadership values in all the elements of the value chain of Patanjali products starting from suppliers to customers. The case emphasizes the role of the Patanjali Food & Herbal park in the value chain. Patanjali Food & Herbal Park is constantly striving for nation building more than profit accumulation. They have created a sustainable business benefiting all the stakeholders. The backbone of the Patanjali Food & Herbal Park lies in robust backward linkage and forward linkage. The context of the case presents an account of how the values based integration of the value chain is a strategic advantage and safeguards an organization from business environment threats.

Expected learning outcomes

The context of the case presents an account of how values based integration of the value chain is a strategic advantage and safeguard an organization from business environment threats. The case has a deep-rooted theoretical association with models like Porter’s Five Forces model on the one hand and also exemplifies how an organization can use blue ocean strategy through value-based value innovation. The context of the Black Swan perspective also emerges in the narration.

Supplementary materials

Teaching Notes are available for educators only. Please contact your library to gain login details or email support@emeraldinsight.com to request teaching notes.

Subject code

CSS 11: Strategy.

Details

Emerald Emerging Markets Case Studies, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Case Study
ISSN: 2045-0621

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2021

Rahul Singh Rathore and Rajat Agrawal

The paper aims to review existing performance indicators in technology business incubators (TBIs) and propose some new indicators with a focus on incubation activities in…

Abstract

Purpose

The paper aims to review existing performance indicators in technology business incubators (TBIs) and propose some new indicators with a focus on incubation activities in higher educational institutes (HEIs) of India.

Design/methodology/approach

Performance indicators of various types of incubators were identified from research papers followed by interview, consultation and suggestion from experts of the subject. Nature of interrelationship between the identified indicators has been established with the help of Interpretive Structural Modelling methodology and Matrice d’impacts croisés multiplication appliquée á un classment analysis.

Findings

Number of ideas came for screening and number of ideas converted to start-ups, survival rate of incubatees is the indicators which have the highest driving power followed by time taken in screening an idea and number of failed or rejected ideas returned back into incubation. Few indicators (driving indicators) are affecting performance of other indicators as well.

Research limitations/implications

Some performance indicators are proposed which can be used for measuring performance of technology incubators in India. The actual implications will be known when these findings are used to assess performance of some technology incubator. This also is the limitation of the study that some cases can be included to validate the findings of this research.

Practical implications

A total of 15 performance indicators for measuring performance of TBIs in Indian HEIs have been proposed. The proposed indicators will help incubator management to prioritize the efforts and resource allocation.

Social implications

TBIs are looked upon as mechanism for promoting entrepreneurial culture in Indian HEIs. Their success is well linked to growth of society. This research will help technology incubators to identify the most important factors in incubation process. Performance improvement will directly affect society in whole. Culture of IEE (Innovation, Entrepreneurship and Employment ) can be achieved through technology incubators

Originality/value

Identification of new indicators for performance measurement of incubators in Indian HEIs is the novelty of this research. This has a lot of value due to multilevel hierarchy model.

Details

Management Research Review, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8269

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2020

Vishnu Nath and Rajat Agrawal

The present study aims to empirically investigate whether supply chain agility and lean management practices are antecedents of supply chain social sustainability.

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1060

Abstract

Purpose

The present study aims to empirically investigate whether supply chain agility and lean management practices are antecedents of supply chain social sustainability.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 311 supply chain practitioners from the Indian manufacturing sector. Confirmatory factor analysis was employed to test the validity and reliability of the measures used, and a structural model was analyzed to test the hypotheses of the current study.

Findings

The results indicate that agility and lean practices are significant antecedents of social sustainability orientation as well as social sustainability performance. The results also suggest that agility has a significant indirect effect on operational performance via social sustainability orientation, basic social sustainability practices as well as agility is indirectly affecting social sustainability performance via social sustainability orientation and basic social sustainability practices.

Practical implications

The results of the present study have implications for managers that want to make their supply chain more socially sustainable.

Originality/value

The study is unique in the sense that it empirically links agility and lean practices with social sustainability orientation, social substantiality performance and operational performance in supply chains.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 40 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 26 February 2019

Juhi Raghuvanshi, Rajat Agrawal and Prakriti Kumar Ghosh

The development of innovation capability (IC) is a central issue for both practitioners and academicians. However, studies that investigate the dimension of IC in the…

Abstract

Purpose

The development of innovation capability (IC) is a central issue for both practitioners and academicians. However, studies that investigate the dimension of IC in the context of micro-enterprises are absent. Based on capability-based view, the purpose of this paper is to identify important dimensions to build a scale to measure IC in micro-enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on focus group discussions for item generation and questionnaire survey on a sample of 379 micro-enterprises in India. The scale is developed with the help of exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis. Statistical tests demonstrate that the scale presents composite reliability as well as discriminant and convergent validity.

Findings

The findings show that four dimensions form IC in micro-enterprises: resources, networking, risk taking and involvement.

Originality/value

This study develops a new scale, which is a measure of IC of micro-enterprises. The implications have been recommended, which focus upon entrepreneurs, academicians and policymakers interested in developing the IC of micro-enterprises in India.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 26 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 December 2017

Kanupriya Gupta and Rajat Agrawal

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between sustainable development (SD) and spirituality. Bhutan, a country believing deeply in Buddhist spiritual…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand the relationship between sustainable development (SD) and spirituality. Bhutan, a country believing deeply in Buddhist spiritual values has created a model of Gross National Happiness (GNH) where it is believed that the holistic evolution of human being can take place with a balance of material as well as non-material aspects of spiritual, cultural, societal and environmental. The paper critically analyzes GNH to establish the role of spirituality in SD.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper analyses the GNH concept using literature review. Further, personal meetings with authorities in Bhutan and interaction with citizens of Bhutan used to gather primary data. A critical approach has been applied to understand the practical implication of the concept.

Findings

Good governance, sustainable socioeconomic development, cultural preservation and environmental conservation formed the four basic pillars of the GNH index, further elaborated into 9 domains and 33 clustered indicators. The concept has been commendable in giving new direction to the understanding of SD. Nevertheless, certain discrepancies create ambiguity and limitations around the validity of adoption of the concept in other countries.

Research limitations/implications

A balanced and holistic, yet practical model of SD is necessitated. Bhutan has been a pioneer to suggest the different dimensions that can be acted upon to produce a more honest and sustainable path of being in concord with nature, community and other-related surroundings.

Practical implications

The paper provides insights to researchers and practitioners in understanding the basic essentials required for the SD agenda. The paper derives the learnings from the GNH model which can help in understanding the areas where the western three-pillar model of development needs more refinement. At the same time, the paper also helps in creating the insights for Bhutanese practitioners and policymakers about the areas where the GNH model still needs to be worked upon to improve its efficacy.

Originality/value

The paper proposes that SD can only be achieved through spirituality.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 44 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 May 2019

Ankur Kashyap and Rajat Agrawal

In the era of Industry 4.0, knowledge component plays a vital role in manufacturing. For tacking the new complexities of the business, a concept of knowledge supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

In the era of Industry 4.0, knowledge component plays a vital role in manufacturing. For tacking the new complexities of the business, a concept of knowledge supply chain (KSC) is being proposed, which takes into account of knowledge component. Higher education institutes (HEIs) which are primary creator of knowledge are important foundations of such supply chain and act as the “knowledge supplier.” The purpose of this paper is to focus on why the HEIs are failed to become knowledge supplier in developing country like India.

Design/methodology/approach

This research paper adopts a resource-based theory to explore the concept and identify barriers which obstructs the progress of HEIs to become prominent knowledge supplier to industry. To tackle the research problem, an integrated hybrid approach of interpretive structural modeling–analytic hierarchy process is used. Expert elicitation was engaged to find out the prominence of each barrier and the interrelations among them.

Findings

Based on literature review, eight critical barriers were recognized. The findings put forward a four layer structural model. Based on this model, various remedial actions are also suggested to eliminate the barriers or lessen their negative effects on KSC.

Practical implications

This study finds its practical implication in higher education reforms as the identified barriers could enhance the decision-making quality regarding academia–industry interaction.

Social implications

Using the results of the study, HEIs could improve their social sustainability as they have different stakeholders covering wider sections of society and one being industry.

Originality/value

Most of the existing studies talk about short-term interactions like technology transfer. This study takes into account the barriers which are acting as roadblocks in long-term knowledge supplying role of HEIs.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 January 2020

Ankur Kashyap and Rajat Agrawal

At present, the contribution of higher educational institutes (HEIs) to economic development and society at large is under constant evaluation. One important parameter…

Abstract

Purpose

At present, the contribution of higher educational institutes (HEIs) to economic development and society at large is under constant evaluation. One important parameter that is counted in their performance is generating intellectual capital. To maximize intellectual property (IP) (specifically patents which are considered to have maximum economic value) pool, the purpose of this paper is to conceptualize IP creation capability (IPCC) relevant to higher education. Furthermore, a scale is developed and validated to measure IPCC in Indian HEIs.

Design/methodology/approach

Both quantitative and qualitative methods were adopted for multi-dimensional scale development. The use of pragmatic approach also complemented exploratory design of the study for exploring relationship and developing a new instrument. The study further maps the connection between constructs of IPCC by proposing a structural model using the partial least squares path modeling method.

Findings

A significant positive relationship was seen among policy, incentives, research facility, working culture and IPCC subjected to Indian conditions. The findings based on data analysis suggest that incentive has a mediating effect between policy and IPCC.

Practical implications

Findings of the study could be used for formulating strategies to improve the current state of IP creation in HEIs. The results of the study could also be applied for a better understanding of the IP creation scenario in HEIs of India and similar developing countries.

Originality/value

This study presents the first endeavor to develop a well-structured scale for measuring IPCC especially in the context of the Indian higher education system. It contributes to research on higher education studies, innovation and IP creation.

Details

Journal of Intellectual Capital, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1469-1930

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Sanjoy Sircar, Rajat Agrawal, SK Shanthi and K. Srinivasa Reddy

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382

Abstract

Details

Journal of Strategy and Management, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-425X

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