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Article
Publication date: 9 July 2018

Fatma Yasli and Bersam Bolat

Risk analysis is a critical investigation field for many sectors and organizations to maintain the information management reliable. Since mining is one of the riskiest…

Abstract

Purpose

Risk analysis is a critical investigation field for many sectors and organizations to maintain the information management reliable. Since mining is one of the riskiest sectors for both workers and management, comprehensive risk analysis should be carried out. The purpose of this paper is to explore comprehensively the undesired events that may occur during a particular process with their main reasons and to perform a risk analysis for these events, by developing a risk analysis methodology. For performing risk analysis, discovering and defining the potential accidents and incidents including their root causes are important contributions of the study as distinct from the related literature. The fuzzy approach is used substantially to obtain the important inferences about the hazardous process by identifying the critical risk points in the processes. In the scope of the study, the proposed methodology is applied to an underground chrome mine and obtaining significant findings of mining risky operations is targeted.

Design/methodology/approach

Fault tree analysis and fuzzy approach are used for performing the risk analysis. When determining the probability and the consequences of the events which are essential components for the risk analysis, expressions of the heterogeneous expert group are considered by means of the linguistic terms. Fault tree analysis and fuzzy approach present a quiet convenience solution together to specify the possible accidents and incidents in the particular process and determine the values for the basis risk components.

Findings

This study primarily presents a methodology for a comprehensive risk analysis. By implementing the proposed methodology to the underground loading and conveying processes of a chrome mine, 28 different undesired events that may occur during the processes are specified. By performing risk analysis for these events, it is established that the employee’s physical constraint while working with the shovel in the fore area, the falling of materials on employees from the chute and the scaling bar injuries are the riskiest undesired events in the underground loading and conveying process of the mine.

Practical implications

The proposed methodology provides a confidential and comprehensive method for risk analysis of the undesired events in a particular process. The capability of fault tree analysis for specifying the undesired events systematically and the applicability of fuzzy approach for converting the experts’ linguistic expressions to the mathematical values provide a significant advantage and convenience for the risk analysis.

Originality/value

The major contribution of this paper is to develop a methodology for the risk analysis of a variety of mining accidents and incidents. The proposed methodology can be applied to many production processes to investigate the dangerous operations comprehensively and find out the efficient management strategies. Before performing the risk analysis, determining the all possible accidents and incidents in the particular process using the fault tree analysis provides the effectiveness and the originality of the study. Also, using the fuzzy logic to find out the consequences of the events with experts’ linguistic expressions provides an efficient method for performing risk analysis.

Details

Journal of Enterprise Information Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0398

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1998

Zhou Jinglun and Sun Quan

A binary decision diagram (BDD) is a representation of Boolean functions that uses the notion of two‐way branching. It has long been used in the synthesis, simulation and…

Abstract

A binary decision diagram (BDD) is a representation of Boolean functions that uses the notion of two‐way branching. It has long been used in the synthesis, simulation and testing of Boolean circuits, and has recently been adopted to solve fault tree models for both quantitative and qualitative reliability analyses. In this paper, the concept of binary decision diagram is first introduced. Then, a new method is proposed to analyze the reliability of fault tolerant systems using binary decision diagrams. Traditionally, such analyses are tackled by using fault trees based on cutsets. For complex models, an algorithm based on binary decision diagrams can shorten solution time dramatically. Experimental results are also presented to demonstrate the practicality and benefits of applying the proposed method in reliability analysis.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

Chakib Kara‐Zaitri

Presents a new qualitative fault tree evaluation algorithm based on bit manipulation techniques for the identification of the largest independent sub‐trees and the…

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1151

Abstract

Presents a new qualitative fault tree evaluation algorithm based on bit manipulation techniques for the identification of the largest independent sub‐trees and the subsequent determination of all minimal cut sets of large and complex fault trees. The methodology developed is validated by direct application to a complex fault tree taken from the literature. Results obtained are compared with those available in the literature. Shows that the use of the algorithm (FTABMT) developed results in significant savings in both computer time and storage requirements.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 7 August 2009

Youngjung Geum, Hyeonju Seol, Sungjoo Lee and Yongtae Park

This study aims to propose a tree‐based analytic tool that may be used in analyzing a large‐scale and complex service process. The tenet of this tool is based on the…

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3167

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to propose a tree‐based analytic tool that may be used in analyzing a large‐scale and complex service process. The tenet of this tool is based on the Boolean logic and named service tree analysis (STA). The proposed STA aims to reflect the customer participation perspective and to propose how to analyze the service process and deduce useful information.

Design/methodology/approach

Fault tree analysis is used as an underlying methodology since it has a Boolean logic to describe the customer's selection of each element and identifies critical events. Taking these advantages of the fault tree, the proposed STA consists of three main parts; service tree construction, qualitative analysis, and quantitative analysis. First, a service tree is constructed depending on how the service elements are selected by the customer; If the subordinate events are always selected by customers, they are linked with an AND gate, otherwise, with an OR gate. Next, in the qualitative analysis, service elements are characterized as core services, supporting services, and optional services by deducing a minimal service cut set. Last, qualitative analysis deals with deriving the impact of each service element based on the Kano model.

Findings

The suggested STA has advantages which help strategic operation and management of the service process.

Originality/value

This study is unique and even exploratory in that it first adopts the notion of tree analysis in structuring a large‐scale, complex service system. Further, the proposed service tree provides a systematic approach from customer participation perspective, which makes the service process to be managed efficiently.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2000

M. Xie, K.C. Tan, K.H. Goh and X.R. Huang

Fault tree analysis (FTA) is a technique widely used in the study of the reliability of industrial systems and to quantify risks associated with potentially hazardous…

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1204

Abstract

Fault tree analysis (FTA) is a technique widely used in the study of the reliability of industrial systems and to quantify risks associated with potentially hazardous systems. Most of the studies carried out are related to how to construct a fault tree and how to carry out qualitative and quantitative analysis. However, this paper studies an approach for prioritisation and optimum resource allocation by making use of the FTA technique. The basic idea is to develop a simple procedure for the ranking of basic elements in the complex system, so that maximum increase in reliability can be achieved. We compare our approach with the existing basic event importance measures, and show that the simple approach is easy to apply and provides ranking that is similar to other more complicated approaches. In addition, the new ranking approach can be used at the initial stages of fault tree construction as it does not require the whole fault tree to be completely developed.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 17 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Abstract

Details

Prioritization of Failure Modes in Manufacturing Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83982-142-4

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2007

Philip Lawrence and Simon Gill

This paper sets out to outline a human hazard analysis methodology as a tool for managing human error in aircraft maintenance, operations and production. The methodology…

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1608

Abstract

Purpose

This paper sets out to outline a human hazard analysis methodology as a tool for managing human error in aircraft maintenance, operations and production. The methodology developed has been used in a slightly modified form on Airbus aircraft programmes. This paper aims to outline a method for managing human error in the field of aircraft design, maintenance and operations. Undertaking the research was motivated by the fact that aviation incidents and accidents still show a high percentage of human‐factors events as key causal factors.

Design/methodology/approach

The methodology adopted takes traditional aspects of the aircraft design system safety process, particularly fault tree analysis, and couples them with a structured tabular notation called a human error modes and effects analysis (HEMEA). HEMEA provides data, obtained from domain knowledge, in‐service experience and known error modes, about likely human‐factors events that could cause critical failure modes identified in the fault tree analysis. In essence the fault tree identifies the failure modes, while the HEMEA shows what kind of human‐factors events could trigger the relevant failure.

Findings

The authors found that the methodology works very effectively, but that it is very dependent on locating the relevant expert judgement and domain knowledge..

Research limitations/implications

The authors found that the methodology works very effectively, but that it is very dependent on locating the relevant expert judgement and domain knowledge. Using the method as a prototype, looking at aspects of a large aircraft fuel system, was very time‐consuming and the industry partner was concerned about the resource implications of implementing this process. Regarding future work, the researchers would like to explore how a knowledge management exercise might capture some of the domain knowledge to reduce the requirement for discursive, seminar‐type sessions with domain experts.

Practical implications

It was very clear that the sponsors and research partners in the aircraft industry were keen to use this method as part of the safety process. Airbus has used a modified form of the process on at least two programmes.

Originality/value

The authors are aware that the UK MOD uses fault tree analysis that includes human‐factors events. However, the researchers believe that the creation of the human error modes effects analysis is original. On the civil side of the aviation business this is the first time that human error issues have been included for systems other than the flightdeck. The research was clearly of major value to the UK Civil Aviation Authority and Airbus, who were the original sponsors.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2020

Pei-Yuan Hsu, Marco Aurisicchio, Panagiotis Angeloudis and Jennifer Whyte

Delays in construction projects are both disruptive and expensive. Thus, potential causes of schedule deviation need to be identified and mitigated. In previous research…

Abstract

Purpose

Delays in construction projects are both disruptive and expensive. Thus, potential causes of schedule deviation need to be identified and mitigated. In previous research, delay factors were predominantly identified through surveys administered to stakeholders in construction projects. Such delay factors are typically considered individually and presented at the same level without explicitly examining their sequence of occurrence and inter-relationships. In reality, owing to the complex structure of construction projects and long execution time, non-conformance to schedule occurs by a chain of cascading events. An understanding of these linkages is important not only for minimising the delays but also for revealing the liability of stakeholders. To explicitly illustrate the cause–effect and logical relationship between delay factors and further identify the primary factors which possess the highest significance toward the overall project schedule delay, the fault tree analysis (FTA) method, a widely implemented approach to root cause problems in safety-critical systems, has been systematically and rigorously executed.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a case study, the in-depth analysis for identifying the most fundamental delay factors has been fulfilled through FTA's tree structure. The logical deduction for mapping and visualising the chronological and cause–effect relationships between various delay factors has been conducted through the logical gate functions of FTA based on the data collected from the site event log, pre-fabricated structural component manufacturing log and face-to-face interview with project stakeholders.

Findings

The analysis identified multiple delay factors and showed how they are linked logically and chronologically from the primary causes to the ultimate undesired event in a rigorous manner. A comparison was performed between the proposed FTA model and the conventional investigation method for revealing the responsibility employed in the construction industry, consisting of event logs and problem reports. The results indicate that the FTA model provides richer information and a clearer picture of the network of delay factors. Importantly, the ability of FTA in revealing the causal connection between the events leading to the undesired delays and in comprehending their prominence in the real-world construction project has been clearly displayed.

Originality/ value

This study demonstrates a new application of FTA in the construction sector allowing the delay factors to be understood and visualised from a new perspective. The new approach has practical use in finding and removing root causes of the delay, as well as clarifying the attribution of responsibility that causes the delay.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 27 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

T. Yuge, K. Tagami and S. Yanagi

Calculating the exact top event probability of fault trees is an important analysis in quantitative risk assessments. However, it is a difficult problem for the trees with…

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1508

Abstract

Purpose

Calculating the exact top event probability of fault trees is an important analysis in quantitative risk assessments. However, it is a difficult problem for the trees with complex structure. Therefore, the paper aims to provide an efficient calculation method to obtain an exact top event probability of a fault tree with many repeated events when the minimal cut sets of the tree model are given.

Design/methodology/approach

The method is based on the inclusion‐exclusion method. Generally, the inclusion‐exclusion method tends to get into computational difficulties for a large‐scale fault tree. The computation time has been reduced by enumerating only non‐canceling terms.

Findings

The method enables the calculation of the probability more quickly than the conventional method. The effect increases as the number of repeated events increases, namely the tree structure becomes complex. This method also can be applied to obtain the lower and upper bounds of the top event probability easily.

Originality/value

The paper expresses the top event probability by using only non‐canceling terms. This is the first application in fault tree analysis.

Details

Journal of Quality in Maintenance Engineering, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2511

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Article
Publication date: 1 November 2003

B.S. Dhillon

This paper presents nine different methods and approaches useful for performing human reliability and error analysis in health care. These methods are failure modes and…

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3704

Abstract

This paper presents nine different methods and approaches useful for performing human reliability and error analysis in health care. These methods are failure modes and effect analysis (FMEA), root cause analysis (RCA), fault tree analysis (FTA), cause and effect diagram (CAED), hazard operability study (HAZOP), probability tree method, error cause removal program (ECRP), man‐machine systems analysis (MMSA), and the Markov method. The applications of many methods are demonstrated through nine solved examples.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 16 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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