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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Ailis ni Riain, Catherine Vahey, Conor Kennedy, Stephen Campbell and Claire Collins

– The purpose of this paper is to describe a national, comprehensive quality indicator set to support delivering high-quality clinical care in Irish general practice.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a national, comprehensive quality indicator set to support delivering high-quality clinical care in Irish general practice.

Design/methodology/approach

Potential general practice quality indicators were identified through a literature review. A modified two-stage Delphi process was used to rationalise international indicators into an indicator set, involving both experts from key stakeholder groups (general practitioners (GPs), practice nurses, practice managers, patient and health policy representatives) and predominantly randomly selected GPs. An illustrative evaluation approach was used to road test the indicator set and supporting materials.

Findings

In total, 80 panellists completed the two Delphi rounds and staff in 13 volunteer practices participated in the road test. The original 171 indicators was reduced to 147 during the Delphi process and further reduced to 68 indicators during the road test. The indicators were set out in 14 sub-domains across three areas (practice infrastructure, practice processes and procedures, and practice staff). Practice staff planned 77 quality improvement activities after their assessment against the indicators and 31 (40 per cent) were completed with 44 (57 per cent) ongoing and two (3 per cent) not advanced after a six-month road test. A General Practice Indicators of Quality indicator set and support materials were produced at the conclusion.

Practical implications

It is important and relatively easy to customise existing quality indicators to a particular setting. The development process can be used to raise awareness, build capacity and drive quality improvement activity in general practices.

Originality/value

The authors describe in detail a method to develop general practice quality indicators for a regional or national population from existing validated indicators using consensus, action research and an illuminative evaluation.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 6 May 2014

Carolina Elisabeth de Korte, Dirk F. de Korne, Jose P. Martinez Ciriano, J. Robert Rosenthal, Kees Sol, Niek S. Klazinga and Roland A. Bal

The purpose of this paper is to study the quality indicator appropriateness and use it for international quality comparison on diabetic retinopathy (DR) patient care…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the quality indicator appropriateness and use it for international quality comparison on diabetic retinopathy (DR) patient care process in one American and one Dutch eye hospital.

Design/methodology/approach

A 17-item DR quality indicator set was composed based on a literature review and systematically applied in two hospitals. Qualitative analysis entailed document study and 12 semi-structured face-to-face interviews with ophthalmologists, managers, and board members of the two hospitals.

Findings

While the medical-clinical approach to DR treatment in both hospitals was similar, differences were found in quality of care perception and operationalization. Neither hospital systematically used outcome indicators for DR care. On the process level, the authors found larger differences. Similarities and differences were found in the structure of both hospitals. The hospitals’ particular contexts influenced the interpretation and use of quality indicators.

Practical implications

Although quality indicators and quality comparison between hospitals are increasingly used in international settings, important local differences influence their application. Context should be taken into account. Since that context is locally bound and directly linked to hospital setting, caution should be used interpreting the results of quality comparison studies.

Originality/value

International quality comparison is increasingly suggested as a useful way to improve healthcare. Little is known, however, about the appropriateness and use of quality indicators in local hospital care practices.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 28 September 2012

Eva Blozik, Monika Nothacker, Thomas Bunk, Joachim Szecsenyi, Günter Ollenschläger and Martin Scherer

The purpose of this paper is to examine the question of how official bodies, health care organisations, and professional associations deal with the absence of a…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the question of how official bodies, health care organisations, and professional associations deal with the absence of a methodological gold standard for the simultaneous development of clinical practice guidelines and quality indicators, what procedures they use and what they feel are major strengths and limitations of their methods.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted a web‐based survey among 90 organisational members of the Guidelines International Network (G‐I‐N) representing 34 countries from Africa, America, Asia, Europe and Oceania. All organisational G‐I‐N members were invited to participate in the survey by following a link provided in the invitation e‐mail.

Findings

The responses of 24 organisations were included in the final analysis. The results indicate a broad variability in the approaches and methods used to develop quality indicators and guidelines simultaneously. The answers of the participants indicated a lack of formal procedures for the simultaneous development. Formal procedures exist in only about half of the participating organisations. In addition, piloting or evaluation of the procedures is almost completely missing. Significantly, respondents mainly reported that the procedure used in their organisation “could certainly be more rigorous”. Besides various strengths, participants reported a considerable number of limitations of the development processes they use.

Originality/value

This survey among G‐I‐N members – despite limitations – gives helpful insights in the state of the simultaneous development of quality indicators and clinical practice guidelines and underlines the need for future activities in methodological standard development and quality improvement of these processes.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 25 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2014

Diego dos Santos Pereira and José Carlos Tiomatsu Oyadomari

This research aimed to verify how the performance measurement system (PMS) and the quality management system (QMS) work in small and medium Brazilian enterprises in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This research aimed to verify how the performance measurement system (PMS) and the quality management system (QMS) work in small and medium Brazilian enterprises in the light of the typology proposed by Garengo (2009).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a qualitative approach PMS’s and QMS’s managers were interviewed. The data from the first interview were analyzed using the technique of content analysis and have been subsequently triangulated with other data collected. The study was conducted by means of two questionnaires, two semi-structured interviews, and the analysis of the performance measures used by five small/medium manufactures based in the State of São Paulo.

Findings

It was found that in four out of five companies, PMS does not function singly, but along with QMS, mainly with respect to performance indicators. In spite of that intrinsic operation, the systems are in different stages of evolution. It was also found that in three out of five companies, quality management area is responsible for coordinating the process of PMS use, without effective participation from the controlling and/or accounting areas in this process.

Originality/value

The typology of Garengo (2009), used to check the stage of the PMS, was validated and can be used by practitioners to diagnose and improve the PMS in their enterprises; companies with QMS certified by ISO, particularly with higher degree of quality management maturity, can be encouraged to implement or improve the PMS in their organizations.

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Pratima Verma, Vimal Kumar, Ankesh Mittal, Bhawana Rathore, Ajay Jha and Muhammad Sabbir Rahman

This study aims to provide insight into the operational factors of big data. The operational indicators/factors are categorized into three functional parts, namely…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to provide insight into the operational factors of big data. The operational indicators/factors are categorized into three functional parts, namely synthesis, speed and significance. Based on these factors, the organization enhances its big data analytics (BDA) performance followed by the selection of data quality dimensions to any organization's success.

Design/methodology/approach

A fuzzy analytic hierarchy process (AHP) based research methodology has been proposed and utilized to assign the criterion weights and to prioritize the identified speed, synthesis and significance (3S) indicators. Further, the PROMETHEE (Preference Ranking Organization METHod for Enrichment of Evaluations) technique has been used to measure the data quality dimensions considering 3S as criteria.

Findings

The effective indicators are identified from the past literature and the model confirmed with industry experts to measure these indicators. The results of this fuzzy AHP model show that the synthesis is recognized as the top positioned and most significant indicator followed by speed and significance are developed as the next level. These operational indicators contribute toward BDA and explore with their sub-categories' priority.

Research limitations/implications

The outcomes of this study will facilitate the businesses that are contemplating this technology as a breakthrough, but it is both a challenge and opportunity for developers and experts. Big data has many risks and challenges related to economic, social, operational and political performance. The understanding of data quality dimensions provides insightful guidance to forecast accurate demand, solve a complex problem and make collaboration in supply chain management performance.

Originality/value

Big data is one of the most popular technology concepts in the market today. People live in a world where every facet of life increasingly depends on big data and data science. This study creates awareness about the role of 3S encountered during big data quality by prioritizing using fuzzy AHP and PROMETHEE.

Details

The TQM Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1754-2731

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Article
Publication date: 11 March 2019

Juliana Zeni Breyer, Juliana Giacomazzi, Regina Kuhmmer, Karine Margarites Lima, Luciano Serpa Hammes, Rodrigo Antonini Ribeiro, Natália Luiza Kops, Maicon Falavigna and Eliana Marcia Wendland

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe hospital quality indicators, classifying them according to Donabedian’s structure, process and outcome model and in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe hospital quality indicators, classifying them according to Donabedian’s structure, process and outcome model and in specific domains (quality, safety, infection and mortality) in two care divisions: inpatient and emergency services.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic review identified hospital clinical indicators. Two independent investigators evaluated 70 articles/documents located in electronic databases and nine documents from the grey literature, 35 were included in the systematic review.

Findings

In total, 248 hospital-based indicators were classified as infection, safety, quality and mortality domains. Only 10.2 percent were identified in more than one article/document and 47 percent showed how they were calculated/obtained. Although there are scientific papers on developing, validating and hospital indicator assessment, most indicators were obtained from technical reports, government publications or health professional associations.

Research limitations/implications

This review identified several hospital structure, process and outcome quality indicators, which are used by different national and international groups in both research and clinical practice. Comparing performance between healthcare organizations was difficult. Common clinical care standard indicators used by different networks, programs and institutions are essential to hospital quality benchmarking.

Originality/value

To the authors’ knowledge, this is the first systematic review to identify and describe hospital quality indicators after a comprehensive search in MEDLINE/PubMed, etc., and the grey literature, aiming to identify as many indicators as possible. Few studies evaluate the indicators, and most are found only in the grey literature, and have been published mostly by government agencies. Documents published in scientific journals usually refer to a specific indicator or to constructing an indicator. However, indicators most commonly found are not supported by reliability or validity studies.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2005

M. van der Spiegel, P.A. Luning, G.W. Ziggers and W.M.F. Jongen

Manufacturers use several quality assurance systems to assure quality. However, their effectiveness cannot be assessed because an instrument does not exist. This article…

Abstract

Purpose

Manufacturers use several quality assurance systems to assure quality. However, their effectiveness cannot be assessed because an instrument does not exist. This article is based on a study that was set up to identify performance measurement indicators of an instrument that measures effectiveness of food quality systems, called IMAQE‐Food.

Design/methodology/approach

The instrument has been developed by translating a conceptual model in quantifiable performance measurement indicators. Literature research, qualitative research, Delphi sessions, and quantitative research were used.

Findings

In total, 28 relevant and comprehensible indicators were obtained that measure performance of quality management, production quality and their influencing factors in the bakery sector.

Originality/value

This paper will make a contribution to the body of knowledge in the field of food quality management by developing an instrument to measure effectiveness instead of compliance with norms and requirements or merely performance. This will support food manufacturers in deciding which system is most suitable to achieve their objectives. The developed procedure can be used for providing insight in determining the desired level of quality management, and for extending the instrument for other applications.

Details

International Journal of Quality & Reliability Management, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-671X

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1998

Bart Van Looy, Paul Gemmel, Steven Desmet, Roland Van Dierdonck and Steven Serneels

Notes that the nature of the service process makes the measurement of productivity and quality more difficult. In this paper a methodology to delineate relevant indicators

Abstract

Notes that the nature of the service process makes the measurement of productivity and quality more difficult. In this paper a methodology to delineate relevant indicators of productivity and quality for services is developed. For both types of indicators, process analysis is a starting point. Insights from activity‐based management are introduced to work out productivity indicators. An approach based on quality function deployment is used to delineate relevant quality indicators. Both approaches are illustrated with case study material. During the process of developing these indicators, it became clear that realizing quality and productivity simultaneously within the service delivery process might imply a trade‐off. Implications and further extensions of this dynamic relationship are discussed within a larger service strategy framework.

Details

International Journal of Service Industry Management, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0956-4233

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Book part
Publication date: 10 November 2005

Etienne Minvielle and John R. Kimberly

We present a description and analysis of the current reforms in the French system of “assurance maladie”, or its health insurance system, particularly as they bear on…

Abstract

We present a description and analysis of the current reforms in the French system of “assurance maladie”, or its health insurance system, particularly as they bear on quality at the hospital level. The measurement and management of quality play a significant role in the reform, thus providing a particularly timely example for health care policy makers, researchers, and managers. We discovered several lessons from the French experience. First, the issue of workload influenced thinking about how best to build a given indicator, and led to careful evaluation of the added value of additional data collection. In some cases the indicators are actually more of a screen or filter than an actual assessment of quality, with particularly high or low values signaling the need for further investigation rather than serving as assessments per se. Second, the development and implementation of quality indicators (QIs) demand the involvement of professionals in the process. Third, process indicators seemed to be more useful than outcome indicators. Fourth, expectations for quality management should be aligned with feasibility and with the reality of measurement system. For example, the workload is closely tied to the state of the hospital data collection systems (indicators selection). Lastly, the twin objectives of quality improvement and accountability do not necessarily mesh easily or well.

Details

International Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-228-3

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Article
Publication date: 13 July 2010

Jean Hertzman and Robert Ackerman

The purpose of this study is to determine which categories and indicators of quality are best suited to evaluating associate degree culinary arts programs (ADCAP).

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to determine which categories and indicators of quality are best suited to evaluating associate degree culinary arts programs (ADCAP).

Design/methodology/approach

The researchers surveyed a national sample of culinary educators and industry chefs in the USA. The instrument asked the participants to rate the importance levels of 50 potential quality indicators for ADCAP. The data were analyzed to determine the most important indicators as well as categories of indicators.

Findings

Data analysis revealed the five most important indicators of quality, based on mean scores, to be: sanitation of kitchen laboratories; industry experience of faculty; subject experience of faculty; required internship; and job placement rates. From these data, the researchers developed a list of 20 suggested quality indicators. The indicators were originally divided into eight categories. The majority of the suggested indicators came from the faculty, organization and administration, and facilities categories. However, factor analysis revealed that the list of indicators could more appropriately be divided into 13 categories.

Research limitations/implications

The members of the American Culinary Federation surveyed may not be representative of all chefs in the USA.

Practical implications

The results provide a basis for educators, students, employers and other stakeholders of ADCAP to evaluate these programs and suggest future research to further evaluate ADCAP quality.

Originality/value

This paper applies multiple theories of evaluating quality in higher education to a type of program that has been under‐researched in the academic literature.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 18 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

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