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Article
Publication date: 10 October 2018

Isabel Prieto-Pastor, Víctor Martín-Pérez and Natalia Martín-Cruz

This paper aims to examine how the different dimensions of project members’ intra-organizational social capital – cognitive, affective and relational – facilitate…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine how the different dimensions of project members’ intra-organizational social capital – cognitive, affective and relational – facilitate knowledge integration in project-based organizations, and how knowledge integration, in turn, impacts explorative and exploitative learning.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an analysis of 129 R&D Spanish organizations, the study analyzes the interconnections between the different dimensions of social capital and how they affect to knowledge integration as antecedent of explorative and exploitative learning in project-based organizations.

Findings

Results confirm that knowledge integration is beneficial for both exploratory and exploitive learning and thus that R&D organizations may be thus ambidextrous in their knowledge management. Related to the three dimensions of social capital, only the cognitive dimension (shared vision) has a significant impact on knowledge integration. However, the analysis confirms the interconnections between the three dimensions of social capital: the relational dimension (social interaction ties) and the cognitive dimension (shared vision) have significant effect on the relational one (trust), and the relational dimension also has an influence on the cognitive dimension. The model proposed in this study thus shows an acceptable capacity to discern the different influence of the dimensions of internal social capital on knowledge integration and, subsequently, ambidextrous learning.

Originality/value

This paper examines the importance of intra-organizational social capital, in terms of their cognitive (shared vision), relational (trust) and structural (social interaction ties) dimensions, for explorative and exploitative learning in project-based organizations. The analysis takes the baton of previous literature where is suggested that the three dimensions of social capital are interlocked and not just need to be considered simultaneously.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 22 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 5 April 2011

Heli Aramo‐Immonen, Kaj U. Koskinen and Pasi L. Porkka

The purpose of this paper is to examine the significance of formal training in projectbased companies.

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1126

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the significance of formal training in projectbased companies.

Design/methodology/approach

First the discussion deals with the concepts of learning, the learning environment, and the motivation to learn in a way in which special focus is on the project team members' motivation to learn. The hypothesis, “People working for projectbased companies are not interested in formal training” is tested by an empirical study, which was conducted on ten Finnish marine and offshore industry companies. Altogether, 54 project team members and project managers attended the multiple‐case study.

Findings

According to the results of the study, formal training is not seen as a necessity among the people working for projectbased companies. This seems to mean that nowadays formal training does not play a significant role in the development of projectbased companies. Further, the people do not necessarily have time to reflect because they are being bombarded by urgent problems and pressing deadlines. A lack of time and a feeling of heavy work load seem to be a normal practise.

Originality/value

Based upon the paper's findings, further research is suggested that would be focussed first on designing integrated learning environments in projectbased companies' processes, and/or second on the training methods utilized, interaction between trainers and project people, and relevancy and efficiency of formal training offered by training organizations to the projectbased companies.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

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Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

John Fitzsimons and Rebecca Turner

Projectbased learning has been used in a number of disciplines to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to simulate professional activities and apply theory…

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315

Abstract

Purpose

Projectbased learning has been used in a number of disciplines to provide undergraduate students with the opportunity to simulate professional activities and apply theory to practice. It has been identified as an effective way to develop a range of transferable skills required by employers. This article aims to report a novel application of projectbased learning, which provided students with an opportunity to work on an international collaboration, facilitated by videoconferencing and Web 2.0.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing on a number of data sources, this article examines the contribution that projectbased learning made to the development of key skills which employers within the media industry expect graduates to possess.

Findings

Conclusions suggest how projectbased learning can be used more widely to develop a range of employability skills. The international context and the use of new technologies were also seen by students to be important aspects of the project. Students offered some original insights into how these may enhance projectbased learning.

Originality/value

This study deals with a novel application of projectbased learning, which gave students an opportunity to work on an international collaboration, facilitated by videoconferencing and Web 2.0. Students offered some original insights into how the international context and the use of new technologies may enhance projectbased learning.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2021

Theres Konrad, Arnim Wiek and Matthias Barth

For professional sustainability work, graduates need to be able to work in teams and collaborate with stakeholders; in other words, they need to have developed…

Abstract

Purpose

For professional sustainability work, graduates need to be able to work in teams and collaborate with stakeholders; in other words, they need to have developed interpersonal competence. There is growing evidence that project-based sustainability courses facilitate interpersonal competence development. However, research so far has focused on single case studies and on assessing learning outcomes. The purpose of this study is to deepen the understanding of how graduate students learn interpersonal competence in project-based sustainability courses.

Design/methodology/approach

This study adopts a multi-case study approach triangulating observations, semi-structured interviews and focus groups supported by Photovoice method. A comparison of three project-based sustainability courses in graduate programs at universities in the USA, Germany, Switzerland and Spain is conducted to gain generalizable insights on how interpersonal competence can be developed through project-based sustainability courses.

Findings

Receiving inputs, experiencing, reflecting and experimenting are four learning processes supportive of interpersonal competence development. Interpersonal attitudes seem to be mostly learned through a combination of experiencing and reflecting, followed by experimenting; not surprisingly, interpersonal knowledge is mostly developed through a combination of receiving inputs, experiencing and (collective) reflection; and interpersonal skills seem to be mostly learned through a combination of receiving inputs and experimenting, or, more directly, experiencing and experimenting.

Practical implications

These findings support the unique learning opportunities offered through project-based sustainability courses and can help instructors to better facilitate students’ development of interpersonal competence.

Originality/value

The value of this study is three-fold: (i) it provides a comprehensive picture of interpersonal competence, including attitudes, knowledge, and skills; (ii) it spells out specific teaching and learning processes; and (iii) it links these to specific interpersonal competence facets and components.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 25 November 2013

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles and Robert Detmering

– The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

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8467

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

Introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Provides information about each source, discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 41 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 16 June 2020

Rakesh Belwal, Shweta Belwal, Azlinor Binti Sufian and Amal Al Badi

Project-Based Learning (PBL) is an innovative approach to learning that employs a multitude of strategies critical for success in the twenty-first century. It exposes…

Abstract

Purpose

Project-Based Learning (PBL) is an innovative approach to learning that employs a multitude of strategies critical for success in the twenty-first century. It exposes students to the real world, opens an extended inquiry process, and boosts their communication skills and interdisciplinary learning. However, the extant literature on PBL places more emphasis on learning through internal rather than external projects. Industrial collaboration projects build partnerships and provide opportunities to work on real problems, often seeking multidisciplinary approaches. This study explores and suggests the benefits that students derived from their participation in an external research and consultancy project at a University in Oman.

Design/methodology/approach

The study follows a qualitative analysis approach founded on an exploratory research design. In-depth interviews were conducted with ten research assistants, two research coordinators, and two project leaders involved in the project. The data from the interview were subjected to the thematic inductive qualitative analysis using Atlas.ti 8 software.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that students derived some direct academic benefits, mainly in the area of conducting research. The major learning happened mostly in non-academic areas, for they learned many things necessary for success in real-life work situations. The students benefited largely on behavioural skills and abilities such as communication, self-confidence, English language skills, planning, thinking, and time management skills. Altogether, project-based learning offered them a different skillset beyond what they usually acquire in the conventional teaching and learning environment.

Practical implications

The outcomes of this research support the development of curriculum design and instructional pedagogy in higher education in a specific context, concluding that PBL has much to do with the practical aspects of learning and employability. The finding suggests that by engaging in PBL, students can develop certain skills that cannot be acquired in a conventional teaching environment. PBL enables self-learning and prepares students to deal with different situations and challenges on the ground while inculcating professionalism to act in real-life situations. This study advocates the introduction of some PBL based courses in the curriculum to nurture a balanced set of skills and abilities among business students.

Social implications

The research outcomes support Oman’s Vision 2040 and one of its strategies for capacity building that aims to adopt innovative methods for individual/collective development of students, as well as for their life-long learning.

Originality/value

Project-based learning described in this study provides a pedagogical way to connect university education to a real-life situation. These results offer promising prospects for infusing outdoor multidisciplinary projects in the course curriculum. This work bears significant value for educators in designing curriculum and facilitating projects, particularly in environments where students exhibit weaknesses or inhibitions to receive the knowledge, appropriately, from the conventional mode of teaching.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 63 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 7 April 2015

Rolf Medina and Alicia Medina

Knowledge-intensive organizations tend to be project intensive having many projects of different size and importance. In this context, competence evolves through projects

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1553

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge-intensive organizations tend to be project intensive having many projects of different size and importance. In this context, competence evolves through projects. The purpose of this paper is to identify the mechanisms that steers competence management in these kinds of organizations and also the factors that are involved in the human capital contribution to competitive advantage in relation to the interaction between parent organizations and projects.

Design/methodology/approach

This study has a contingency theory perspective and consists of a literature search in the following domains: project-intensive organizations, knowledge-intensive organizations, competence management, human resource management and dynamic capabilities and learning.

Findings

The main contribution of this study is the theoretical framework derived from different domains. The framework is called the competence loop and explains how projects generate competence that the parent organization can either exploit in further activities or use for strategy adjustment. It also explains how an organization can use learning strategies to support competence exploration/exploitation. Another contribution is the description of the relationship between dynamic capabilities and organizational learning in project-intensive organizations.

Research limitations/implications

This paper is a conceptual paper intended to create a base for further empirical studies.

Originality/value

The paper combines different domains to define a framework that is a new approach to competence management in a project-parent organizational context. The framework includes learning and competence management characteristics and has both theoretical and practical value.

Details

International Journal of Managing Projects in Business, vol. 8 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8378

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2005

Mai Neo

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of a web‐based constructivist learning environment, which was developed based on a course given to students in the Faculty…

Downloads
6443

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the impact of a web‐based constructivist learning environment, which was developed based on a course given to students in the Faculty of Creative Multimedia (FCM) on student learning.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a web‐based multimedia‐mediated project was developed based on an Internet Applications course where students were taught to use specific web authoring tools to solve a web‐related problem. The mode of learning was geared towards a student‐centred, constructivist learning perspective where students were active learners, worked in a group environment and constructed knowledge and understanding in their learning process. An online survey was given to the students to assess their reactions towards this learning environment.

Findings

The results obtained were positive and satisfactory. In this learning process, students were able to understand the problem, work collaboratively, construct their own solutions, and determine their own learning outcomes. Feedback on the online survey provided further support of the students' positive attitudes towards this learning environment.

Research limitations/implications

The implications of this research study are that students found that the web‐based learning environment allowed them to be more active participants in their learning process, increasing their critical and creative thinking skills as well as improving their problem‐solving skills. They learned “how to learn” and developed several learning skills such as communication, teamwork, collaboration and presentation, as well as achieving ownership of these learning outcomes. The use of multimedia‐ and web‐based tools for their project allowed them to be innovative in their presentations, making the project more fun for them.

Practical implications

This research provides educators with an innovative approach to teaching with technology, and students with a more effective learning environment.

Originality/value

This paper fulfils Malaysia's MSC initiative to include ICT in the classroom teaching environment and to focus on learner‐centred teaching and learning strategies. This constructivist‐based learning environment also enabled students to build their problem‐solving and collaborative skills as well as their creative and critical thinking abilities in order to meet the rising demands of twenty‐first century organisations.

Details

Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 30 October 2007

Anita Walsh

In the UK there is currently a national consultation on the structure/adoption of an academic credit framework for higher education. The purpose of this paper is to argue…

Downloads
449

Abstract

Purpose

In the UK there is currently a national consultation on the structure/adoption of an academic credit framework for higher education. The purpose of this paper is to argue that the principles underlying such a framework, when applied in the context of a workplace research project, can facilitate debate between the academic disciplines and work‐based learning practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper argues that the workplace project, when designed and structured according to credit principles, offers a valuable point at which to interact with academic colleagues from the disciplines, and to engage them in debate regarding the academic validity of work‐based learning. The case made here is that workplace research projects (which will have an element of familiarity to colleagues) and academic credit practice (where learning recognition is not contextualised but level of achievement is fundamental) can offer a way to engender that debate.

Findings

The lack of academic confidence in work‐based learning has been consistently experienced by academics introducing work‐based learning in the UK and Australia, and they are very much aware of the need to overcome it. There is a challenge to the structure and basis of higher education is taking place in a sector which, until recently, was functioning effectively in an élite tradition.

Originality/value

The paper indicates a way to address the academic issues raised by full recognition of workplace learning and engage with them by using the “language” of credit practice, which can accommodate both new and established academic practice.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 19 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Anna Marie Johnson, Claudene Sproles, Robert Detmering and Jessica English

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Downloads
5112

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a selected bibliography of recent resources on library instruction and information literacy.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper introduces and annotates periodical articles, monographs, and audiovisual material examining library instruction and information literacy.

Findings

Information is provided about each source, and the paper discusses the characteristics of current scholarship, and describes sources that contain unique scholarly contributions and quality reproductions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians and interested parties as a quick reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 40 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Keywords

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