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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2001

Caroline M. Crawford

Interactive activities are an important aspect of distributed learning situations, wherein online communities and learner motivational levels evolve and thrive. Through…

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602

Abstract

Interactive activities are an important aspect of distributed learning situations, wherein online communities and learner motivational levels evolve and thrive. Through the thoughtful integration of interactive activities into the online learning process, learners and instructors gain considerable exposure to reciprocally favorable occurrences among learners, content, interface, instructor, community, and self. The thoughtful design and development of a distributed learning environment aids the use of interactive activities in moving beyond mere online interactions towards a more theoretically productive level of interactions. Within a theoretically productive level of interaction wherein the learners obtain information, develop conceptual frameworks through which the information is not only derived but becomes useful knowledge, develop higher‐level thinking skills, and continue to be internally motivated to continue with the course, the learners conceptualize a learning community which can be sorely lacking within distributed learning situations that do not integrate appropriate interactive activities.

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Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2011

Suwit Srimai, Nitirath Damsaman and Sirilak Bangchokdee

This paper aims to examine the role of performance measurement in the Thai public sector. It seeks to explore the interactive use of strategic performance measurement

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2573

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the role of performance measurement in the Thai public sector. It seeks to explore the interactive use of strategic performance measurement systems (SPMS) and organizational learning as a means to achieve strategic alignment at the provincial level of government, inter‐organizational networks of public agencies.

Design/methodology/approach

Questionnaires were sent to all chief officials of the Office of Governors in Thailand. Path analysis was used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

The findings revealed significant relationships between interactive use of SPMS and organizational learning and between interactive use of SPMS and strategic alignment. The results also showed an indirect effect of interactive use of SPMS on strategic alignment through organizational learning.

Originality/value

This paper provides a considerable contribution about the use of performance measurement in inter‐organizational networks which is relatively limited in the public arena.

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Measuring Business Excellence, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1368-3047

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Article
Publication date: 9 November 2012

Francisco J. Arenas‐Márquez, José A.D. Machuca and Carmen Medina‐López

The purpose of this paper is to describe a computer‐assisted learning experience in operations management (OM) higher education that entailed the development of interactive

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2176

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe a computer‐assisted learning experience in operations management (OM) higher education that entailed the development of interactive learning software, its evaluation in an experimental environment and the formal analysis of the teaching method's influence on student perceptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The software design follows the constructivist focus based on widely‐accepted educational technology principles. Objective tests of knowledge and subjective appraisal of the learning process were used in the experiment to compare two educational scenarios (computer‐assisted learning and on‐site class). Students' perceptions of the software's technical and teaching features are also analyzed.

Findings

The study shows that the teaching method can significantly affect students' perceptions of the learning process. The findings also confirm the pedagogical effectiveness of the software that was designed and that information communication technologies (ICT)‐based methods are an alternative to traditional methods used in OM education.

Research limitations/implications

The experiment involved strict control over various potential threats to validity. From a statistical point‐of‐view, the conclusions can only be generalized in the population analyzed. Nevertheless, the features of the software and the student profile allow the main conclusions to be generalized to other OM environments.

Practical implications

The use and evaluation of interactive software in OM educational environments are reflected on, with emphasis on the influence that the teaching methodology has on students' attitudes to the learning process. It is of interest for researchers interested in improving teaching through the use of ICT.

Originality/value

There are very few studies on interactive self‐learning software for OM and its effects on student perceptions. This paper is a new contribution to this field.

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Article
Publication date: 2 February 2010

Yen‐Tsung Huang and Wenyi Chu

Faced with increased global competition, suppliers must continually update their technology and capabilities to effectively respond to the rapid changes in customer…

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1913

Abstract

Purpose

Faced with increased global competition, suppliers must continually update their technology and capabilities to effectively respond to the rapid changes in customer requirements. In the original equipment manufacturer (OEM) supply relationships, it is particularly important for suppliers to enhance their product development capabilities by learning from customers. However, few existing studies have empirically explored this issue. This paper aims to fill some of the gaps.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on the organisational learning perspective, this paper investigates learning between the suppliers and customers of OEM relations as well as its impact on suppliers' product development capabilities. Structure equation modelling was used with data collected from 147 OEM supply relations of 117 Taiwanese information technology (IT) companies. The relationships among learning intent, interactive learning, internalised learning, and product development capabilities were examined.

Findings

Results show that suppliers with a high learning intent are able to facilitate inter‐organisational and intra‐organisational learning to enhance their product development capabilities.

Originality/value

The paper proposes and empirically tests a model to explain how the OEM suppliers' product development capabilities are enhanced by the relationships between learning intent, inter‐organisational learning, and intra‐organisational learning.

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Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 25 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2004

Tse‐Kian Neo and Mai Neo

With the infusion of the multimedia technology into the education arena, traditional educational materials can be translated into interactive electronic form through the…

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8309

Abstract

With the infusion of the multimedia technology into the education arena, traditional educational materials can be translated into interactive electronic form through the use of multimedia authoring tools. This has allowed teachers to design and incorporate multimedia elements into the content to convey the message in a multi‐sensory learning environment. The focus in education is thus moving towards using multimedia as the instructional media and a platform in teaching and learning. This paper focuses on using the multimedia design process to enable educators to re‐design their educational curricula into an interactive and media‐rich learning environment. This multimedia educational design process will reinforce and strengthen the traditional instructional communication process and foster a number of innovative methods to communicate knowledge to the learners. In this context, there is a need to adjust the educator's approach to teaching, preparing content and delivering learning materials.

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Campus-Wide Information Systems, vol. 21 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1065-0741

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Devi R. Gnyawali, Alice C. Stewart and John H. Grant

By adopting a cognitive perspective, we examine ways in which knowledge creation processes within organizations effectively enhance organizational knowledge via the…

Abstract

By adopting a cognitive perspective, we examine ways in which knowledge creation processes within organizations effectively enhance organizational knowledge via the cognitive processes of organizational members. We identify two distinct yet complementary learning processes—informational and interactive—and argue that these processes contribute to the creation of organizational knowledge in different ways. We use cognitive mapping to examine changes in knowledge and use a research design involving pre‐test and post‐test of cognitive maps. Results suggest that organizational knowledge generally improves as organizations engage in the knowledge creation processes and that the effectiveness of such processes in creating knowledge depends on the context. The conceptual arguments and methods developed in this paper should encourage researchers to conduct additional empirical research and help managers change the mix of the informational and interactive learning processes for effective learning as their firm's competitive environment becomes more volatile.

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International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1934-8835

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2020

Per-Erik Ellström, Mattias Elg, Andreas Wallo, Martina Berglund and Henrik Kock

This paper introduces interactive research as an emerging approach within a broad family of collaborative research approaches in management and organization research…

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1303

Abstract

Purpose

This paper introduces interactive research as an emerging approach within a broad family of collaborative research approaches in management and organization research. Interactive research is a way to contribute to the dual tasks of long-term theory development and innovation and change processes in organizations. One of the distinguishing features of interactive research is a focus on continuous joint learning processes between the researchers and the involved practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The basic concepts, contributions and challenges of the interactive research approach are presented and illustrated in the present paper through a practical case, the HELIX Centre.

Findings

Interactive research is a way to advance scientific knowledge about the development of new types of work organizations and the development of sustainable operations. The multi-disciplinary and interactive research approach at HELIX has made it possible to reach a high degree of both rigour and relevance in research questions and projects. The authors identified five principles from the HELIX case that were instrumental in accomplishing the dual tasks of interactive research.

Originality/value

The interactive research approach is a powerful method of collaboration between different stakeholders throughout the research process. This type of research makes it possible to interact at various levels of research, from the programme level, to research and development projects, to the individual level. The results from interactive research should not only be considered traditionally valid but also valid in relation to organizational and societal needs.

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Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 31 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

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Article
Publication date: 25 July 2020

Muhammad Mujtaba Asad, Nadia Hussain, Maria Wadho, Zahid Hussain Khand and Prathamesh P. Churi

The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) has become a major driving force in transforming education worldwide. Similarly, in the last ten years, the…

Abstract

Purpose

The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) has become a major driving force in transforming education worldwide. Similarly, in the last ten years, the usage of ICTs and e-learning in Pakistan has increased. Whereas the latest educational policy of the Government of Pakistan has focused on using ICTs and e-learning in schools and universities. The national professional standards for teachers have also suggested teachers to integrate ICTs in their classrooms and develop e-learning platforms for teaching and learning processes. However, in this study the effectiveness of information and communication and e-learning technologies integration in teaching and learning has been assessed. The context selected for this research study is a public university of Sindh, Pakistan. The research gap, which has been founded through the extensive literature review, indicated that most of the students are not able to utilize ICTs effectively. The first objective of this study is to enable students to gain wider range of knowledge and access Internet for developing a global outlook. Moreover, the second objective of this study is to develop students' capabilities of processing information more effectively and efficiently for teaching and learning.

Design/methodology/approach

By nature, this study is quantitative survey-based research study. For this purpose, data has been collected from students and teachers of English, Computer Science and Business Administration departments of targeted university, survey questionnaires have been adopted as a data collection tool. Whereas the random sampling technique is used for the collection of data by using Morgan table of sample size. Additionally, data has been collected from 100 participants, 80 of them were students and 20 were teachers, and data has been analyzed by using SPSS 22.0 software.

Findings

The findings of this study have indicated the student's level of interest toward the integration of ICTs and e-learning in science and social science courses. Similarly, the findings specify that through ICT and e-learning materials, students can learn more effectively, which can also facilitate teachers for their teaching process in this modern era of technology. Whereas the issue that has been specified through the findings is that the teachers are not encouraged by the management of the university to implement the ICT in their teaching and learning due to their concerns on the limited resources and lack of competencies.

Practical implications

For the practical implication, the findings of this study will facilitate the teachers and learners for integrating the ICTs and e-learning in their course curriculums and interactive teaching practices as per modern era of technology. Also, this study will help the provincial leader and policymakers by addressing the teachers’ concern to encourage the integration of ICT tools and develop capabilities for interactive classrooms for effective teaching and learning.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its nature that has been conducted in the Pakistani public university in rural setting, and the finding of this study will facilitate and help the institutional and government stakeholders to where and how they can effectively integrate ICTs and e-learning in classrooms for interactive teaching and learning processes in the rural Sindh.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2013

Asmaa Alsumait and Zahraa S. Al‐Musawi

Interactive storytelling is a powerful tool for improving children's development of essential skills and general knowledge. As an informal learning method, interactive

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1253

Abstract

Purpose

Interactive storytelling is a powerful tool for improving children's development of essential skills and general knowledge. As an informal learning method, interactive storytelling provides life experience and promotes the use of vocabulary and communication skills. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a storytelling tool was developed to help kindergarteners create stories. This tool included an instrument used to measure four characteristics of four‐ to five‐year‐old children: general knowledge, creativity, self‐confidence and between the children and the technology to assess a child's progress. Moreover, there is a pressing need to better understand and improve upon this educational innovation. Therefore, this paper proposed the child interactive storytelling (CIS) framework.

Findings

The developed interactive storytelling tool helped instructors as well as parents to perceive the child's progress through multiple use of the tool. Experiments indicated that teachers' evaluations of their children with those measured from the developed tool were aligned which indicates that the interactive storytelling tool is valid. Moreover, the proposed CIS framework for formalizing the design of interactive storytelling tools can be used in educational interventions for children.

Originality/value

The proposed CIS framework can guide both research and practice in the design, development and evaluation of effective and useful CIS environments.

Details

International Journal of Pervasive Computing and Communications, vol. 9 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1742-7371

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Article
Publication date: 2 April 2021

Hussein Haruna, Asad Abbas, Zamzami Zainuddin, Xiao Hu, Robin R. Mellecker and Samira Hosseini

This paper aims to evaluate the students’ perception of their learning experiences concerning serious gaming and gamification instructions and determines whether they were…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the students’ perception of their learning experiences concerning serious gaming and gamification instructions and determines whether they were motivated enough and engaged during the educative process in a resource-poor context. Moreover, the study evaluated the impact of interactive instructional environment outcomes in terms of students’ perceptions of the learning catalysed by gamified systems, particularly in enhancing attitude change coupled with knowledge acquisition.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used a qualitative research design technique to collect the data. A total of 108 first year secondary school students participated in a sexual health literacy course that lasted for a five-week learning period. Using a cluster-sampling technique, three classes were randomly assigned to serious gaming, gamification and teacher-centred instructions. Individual face-to-face interviews were used to assess students’ perceives required satisfaction with three instructions. Data were audio-recorded, and coding analysis was used using NVivo software facilitated qualitative data analysis.

Findings

The results show that serious gaming and gamification instructions trumped the traditional teacher-centred instruction method. While intervention students were all positive about the serious gaming and gamification instructions, non-intervention students were negative about conservative teacher-centered learning whose limited interactivity also undermined learning relative to the two innovative interventions.

Research limitations/implications

As a justification to limit face-to-face classes, this study may be useful during an emergency phenomenon, including the current situation of amid COVID-19. The implementation of serious gaming and gamification as remotely instructional options could be among the measures to protect educational communities through reducing close-proximity, and eventually, control contamination and the spread of viruses.

Originality/value

The application of serious gaming and game elements should not be conceptualised as universal but context-specific. This study shows that particularism is essential to optimise the results in terms of coming up with a specific design based on the scope of evaluation for positive results and develop an intervention that will work, especially in the resource-poor context of the developing world.

Details

Information and Learning Sciences, vol. 122 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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