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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2018

Debbie Isobel Keeling, Angus Laing and Ko De Ruyter

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the changing nature of healthcare service encounters by studying the phenomenon of triadic engagement incorporating interactions…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to focus on the changing nature of healthcare service encounters by studying the phenomenon of triadic engagement incorporating interactions between patients, local and virtual networks and healthcare professionals.

Design/methodology/approach

An 18-month longitudinal ethnographic study documents interactions in naturally occurring healthcare consultations. Professionals (n=13) and patients (n=24) within primary and secondary care units were recruited. Analysis of observations, field notes and interviews provides an integrated picture of triadic engagement.

Findings

Triadic engagement is conceptualised against a two-level framework. First, the structure of triadic consultations is identified in terms of the human voice, virtual voice and networked voice. These are related to: companions’ contributions to discussions and the virtual network impact. Second, evolving roles are mapped to three phases of transformation: enhancement; empowerment; emancipation. Triadic engagement varied across conditions.

Research limitations/implications

These changing roles and structures evidence an increasing emphasis on the responsible consumer and patients/companions to utilise information/support in making health-related decisions. The nature and role of third voices requires clear delineation.

Practical implications

Structures of consultations should be rethought around the diversity of patient/companion behaviours and expectations as patients undertake self-service activities. Implications for policy and practice are: the parallel set of local/virtual informational and service activities; a network orientation to healthcare; tailoring of support resources/guides for professionals and third parties to inform support practices.

Originality/value

Contributions are made to understanding triadic engagement and forwarding the agenda on patient-centred care. Longitudinal illumination of consultations is offered through an exceptional level of access to observe consultations.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2001

Ed B. Peile and Wendy Briner

New ways of working predicate new ways of learning. Reports on a workshop which examined facilitated case history discussions as a means whereby a team could share and…

Abstract

New ways of working predicate new ways of learning. Reports on a workshop which examined facilitated case history discussions as a means whereby a team could share and extend their learning around the common focus of interest – the patient. Discussion in the workshop focused on “how‐to” aspects of small group facilitation. A question stimulated subsequent enquiry about “privileging voices”. Examines how the facilitation enabled interactive, inter‐professional education through an informal form of discourse analysis on the transcripts of the case discussions. The concept of “privileging voices” is demonstrable in the way the authors worked to facilitate the case history discussions.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 6 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 2005

Sergio Ariño‐Blasco, Win Tadd and Josep Boix‐Ferrer

Professionals' views concerning the importance of dignity and how this can best be maintained is important for the planning and provision of appropriate services…

Abstract

Professionals' views concerning the importance of dignity and how this can best be maintained is important for the planning and provision of appropriate services, especially for older people.Dignity was described as an integral part of being human and closely related to respect. Overall, participants painted a negative image of the lives of older people, although clear distinctions were drawn between fit and frail older people. Indignities associated with old age arose from ill health, dependency, vulnerability, frailty and loss of competence. It was considered that technological advances and information technology had left many older people behind. However, many described working with older people as an enjoyable experience offering variety, intellectual challenge and satisfaction, while recognising that working with older people was often given low status.Professionals identified the following factors as essential to dignified care: promotion of autonomy and independence; a person‐centred and holistic approach; maintenance of identity and encouragement of involvement, participation and empowerment; effective communication and respect. Undignified care was associated with: invisibility; de‐personalisation and treatment of the individual as an object; humiliation and abuse; narrow and mechanistic approaches to care.Policy development and professional education should give greater prominence to dignity and a greater emphasis ought to be placed on living with dignity in old age rather than solely dying with it.

Details

Quality in Ageing and Older Adults, vol. 6 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-7794

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Book part
Publication date: 26 October 2005

Helen Freidus, Susan Feldman, Charissa M. Sgouros and Marilyn Wiles-Kettenmann

This chapter documents monthly meetings of Bank Street College Reading and Literacy alumnae between October 2002 and December 2004. It describe the ways in which case…

Abstract

This chapter documents monthly meetings of Bank Street College Reading and Literacy alumnae between October 2002 and December 2004. It describe the ways in which case study and self-study methodologies enabled participants to support their own professional development and that of colleagues. Findings suggest that the process enabled participants to revisit, reconsider, and reframe understandings and perspectives both in the minute and later as they shared experiences with a broader audience. Outcomes include a more extensive professional knowledge base, increased ability to meet the needs of children and parents, and a stronger sense of self as professional identity.

Details

Learning from Research on Teaching: Perspective, Methodology, and Representation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-254-2

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Book part
Publication date: 27 May 2017

David C. Young and Andrew Foran

Teaching professional literacy is a difficult endeavor, yet it is extremely important that educators are equipped with the required knowledge, skills, and attributes…

Abstract

Teaching professional literacy is a difficult endeavor, yet it is extremely important that educators are equipped with the required knowledge, skills, and attributes necessary to be engaged and responsible members of the profession. This chapter addresses the combined efforts of a university faculty of education working in concert with a provincial teacher union and school boards to assist pre-service teacher candidates in developing their own sense of professional identity. It will be demonstrated that this partnership assisted students in conceptualizing a professional identity by solidifying their understanding of ethical, legal, and organizational issues commonly associated with the teaching profession.

Details

University Partnerships for Pre-Service and Teacher Development
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78714-265-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1994

Pauline Neale

This article is primarily concerned with professionals, their institutions and their relations with the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), from a British point…

Abstract

This article is primarily concerned with professionals, their institutions and their relations with the Commission of the European Communities (CEC), from a British point of view. It will be argued that professionals in Europe are not simply affected by European Union (EU) legislation, they help formulate it and they administer it to an extent bounded by the Commission.

Details

International Journal of Sociology and Social Policy, vol. 14 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-333X

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Jen Pecoskie and Heather L. Hill

This paper aims to examine the current state of collecting with emphasis on small, independent and local digital media for the purpose of exploring librarians’ tools to…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the current state of collecting with emphasis on small, independent and local digital media for the purpose of exploring librarians’ tools to develop unique collections with these types of cultural products included.

Design/methodology/approach

This conceptual paper is based on examination of the current state of publishing and digital media, of case profiles of independent digital content providers, of case profiles of public libraries using digital media to expand collections and of collection developers’ tools, including reviewing sources.

Findings

With regard to expanding collections from small, independent and local digital content providers, user-generated content (UGC) is offered as a tool for collection developers to use alongside other traditional reviewing sources. UGC allows for embedding collective voices into collection development practices to capture digital cultural products from these providers.

Originality/value

This paper reflects on the current state of digital content creation and publishing, including the limitations and possibilities in place for the future of public library collections from both large publishing companies and smaller media creators. Non-traditional digital media are cultural products produced for consumption and reception; therefore, we consider how these materials fit into contemporary collections, how they are connected to public libraries and subsequently are made available to library users.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 33 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

Keywords

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Abstract

Details

Living the Work: Promoting Social Justice and Equity Work in Schools around the World
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-127-5

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Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Barrie Gunter, Vincent Campbell, Maria Touri and Rachel Gibson

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emergence of blogging in the news sphere. If blogs represent a genuinely new breed of news provision, then they should adhere…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the emergence of blogging in the news sphere. If blogs represent a genuinely new breed of news provision, then they should adhere to some of the founding principles of mainstream news and journalism. A key principle in this respect is news credibitility.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents a review of recent literature about news blogging and assesses whether news blogs manifest many of the core attributes of mainstream news and journalism. The review considers the attributes that have previously been identified as defining good quality news and competent journalism and then applies some of these principles to “news” blogging.

Findings

There is no doubt that blogs have emerged as news sources of increasing significance and there have been occasions when they can be influential in setting news agendas. The essential qualities of credibitiltiy and capturing public trust in the news sphere, however, often depends upon the established reputation of known news “brands”. Although some blogs have emerged as reliable information sources in some specialist areas, they have yet generally to assume the key characteristics of mainstream news that drive public trust.

Originality/value

This paper provides an up‐to‐date review of a topic that is rapidly developing and attempts to set out some foundations on which further analysis of news blogging can be constructed.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 61 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

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Book part
Publication date: 24 July 2020

Soo-Hoon Lee, Thomas W. Lee and Phillip H. Phan

Workplace voice is well-established and encompasses behaviors such as prosocial voice, informal complaints, grievance filing, and whistleblowing, and it focuses on…

Abstract

Workplace voice is well-established and encompasses behaviors such as prosocial voice, informal complaints, grievance filing, and whistleblowing, and it focuses on interactions between the employee and supervisor or the employee and the organizational collective. In contrast, our chapter focuses on employee prosocial advocacy voice (PAV), which the authors define as prosocial voice behaviors aimed at preventing harm or promoting constructive changes by advocating on behalf of others. In the context of a healthcare organization, low quality and unsafe patient care are salient and objectionable states in which voice can motivate actions on behalf of the patient to improve information exchanges, governance, and outreach activities for safer outcomes. The authors draw from the theory and research on responsibility to intersect with theories on information processing, accountability, and stakeholders that operate through voice between the employee-patient, employee-coworker, and employee-profession, respectively, to propose a model of PAV in patient-centered healthcare. The authors complete the model by suggesting intervening influences and barriers to PAV that may affect patient-centered outcomes.

Details

Research in Personnel and Human Resources Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80043-076-1

Keywords

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