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Article

Trixie Mottershead and Ceri Woodrow

The purpose of this paper is to explore the clinical perspective of the practicality, utility and face-validity of the dynamic support database (DSD) Red, Amber, Green…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the clinical perspective of the practicality, utility and face-validity of the dynamic support database (DSD) Red, Amber, Green (RAG) rating support tool within adult learning disabilities services in a North West NHS Foundation Trust. The aim of the current project is to evaluate the practicality, utility and face-validity of the DSD RAG rating support tool, as reported by clinicians who have been employing it.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed-methods design was utilised by asking clinicians to complete a questionnaire in relation to the DSD Support Tool. Questionnaires were distributed across three community learning disability teams within the North West. A total of 50 clinicians completed the questionnaire which included rated responses for quantitative analysis and free-text comments for qualitative analysis.

Findings

Positive ratings given by clinicians suggested good practicality, utility and face-validity in relation to the tool. Analysis of the free-text comments suggested that the tool supported clinical judgement in a standardised way and helped discussions with commissioners. Feedback also provided insights into how the DSD support tool could be improved.

Research limitations/implications

Further investigation would be required to yield higher numbers of participation across NHS Trusts to add reliability to the present findings.

Originality/value

The DSD support tool has been used within the NHS Foundation Trust for the last 12 months however the practicality, utility and face-validity of the tool had not been explored from the clinician perspective.

Details

Advances in Mental Health and Intellectual Disabilities, vol. 13 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1282

Keywords

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Article

Stephen Fox

Potential for practical stylish combination of micro-electronics and computational functionalities into apparel has been recognized for many years. Yet, wearable computing…

Abstract

Purpose

Potential for practical stylish combination of micro-electronics and computational functionalities into apparel has been recognized for many years. Yet, wearable computing is often characterized by distinctive style or by utilitarian practicality. The purpose of this paper is to investigate what actions can be taken to address the style vs practicality trade-off in wearable computing.

Design/methodology/approach

Action research with luxury apparel company, comprising interviews, facility views, literature reviews, technology analyses, production, and evaluation of prototypes.

Findings

Trade-off between style and practicality is likely to continue to be intractable for luxury garments. This is because the inclusion of micro-electronics into garments can compromise comfort and introduce onerous regulatory issues.

Practical implications

There is more scope for practical stylish wearable computing with accessory apparel such as bags. This is because comfort is less likely to be compromised by micro-electronics, and requirements for charging can be less reliant on human intervention.

Originality/value

The originality of this paper is that reports findings from a wearable computing action research case study that involved active participation of a luxury apparel company. The value of this paper is that it covers both technological factors and luxury considerations.

Details

International Journal of Clothing Science and Technology, vol. 26 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-6222

Keywords

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Article

John Tzilivakis, Andrew Green, Doug Warner, Kate McGeevor and Kathy Lewis

The pressure on the food industry and society as a whole to evolve towards more sustainable production and consumption has increased in recent years. There are a number of…

Abstract

Purpose

The pressure on the food industry and society as a whole to evolve towards more sustainable production and consumption has increased in recent years. There are a number of drivers that can help reduce environmental impacts including legislative instruments, retail marketing and consumer choices and demand. One driver that has received attention recently is the use of product labels, either on a single issue or on multiple issues (using omni‐labelling). The purpose of this paper is to report on a framework that emerged from a wider study exploring effective approaches to environmental labelling of food products.

Design/methodology/approach

Techniques for assessing the environmental impacts of food production were reviewed and a consultation was undertaken with industry and consumer experts to ascertain their views (using multi‐criteria mapping) on the practicality and efficacy of environmental labels.

Findings

The wider study found that although the science is not sufficiently robust to develop an outcome‐based, environmentally broad, omni‐label at this time, there is a role for environmental labelling in conjunction with other initiatives to improve the sustainability of food production and consumption. The framework presented aims to support this role and help improve the practicality and efficacy of environmental labels. It provides a series of interrelated guidelines which provide a basis for developing more effective, robust, credible and practical environmental labels for food.

Practical implications

The framework can be used to design new, or evaluate existing labelling schemes and to identify opportunities for improvements. The process is illustrated with an application to four existing schemes.

Originality/value

Eco‐labelling of food products is gaining interest globally, but there are numerous issues that need to be fully understood in order to develop credible and robust labelling systems.

Details

Sustainability Accounting, Management and Policy Journal, vol. 3 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-8021

Keywords

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Article

Chih-Huei Ko, Sou-Chin Wu and Chien-Yu Chen

Numerous studies have examined individual attitudes and behaviors in both face-to-face (FTF) communication and computer-mediated communication (CMC). However, little…

Abstract

Purpose

Numerous studies have examined individual attitudes and behaviors in both face-to-face (FTF) communication and computer-mediated communication (CMC). However, little research has focused on differences between FTF communication and CMC with respect to idea generation for new product development or on the role of their individual characteristics. Thus, the purpose of this study is to examine the influences of FTF, CMC and brand knowledge on idea generation.

Design/methodology/approach

This study conducted a 4 × 2 quasi-experimental design to examine the effects of four types of interactive groups (low and high level of FTF × low and high level of CMC) and brand knowledge (low and high) on novel and practical idea generation. Data from168 members of the Mondeo Motor Club in Taiwan were assessed.

Findings

Participants with more FTF interaction were more likely to generate novelty ideas than practicality ideas. In addition, participants with high brand knowledge produced more novel and practical ideas compared with participants with low brand knowledge. However, the empirical findings did not support the moderating role of brand knowledge in the relationship between interactive behaviors and idea generations.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study are relevant for facilitating the “novelty” and “practicality” ideas in virtual brand communities. However, this research examined a single community, which may limit the generalizability of its results to other virtual communities.

Originality/value

Few studies have focused on online idea generation from a consumer-to-consumer (C2C) interaction perspective. The results of this study can assist marketers to understand how C2C interactive behaviors differentiate the “novelty” and “practicality” ideas.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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Article

Rikke Brinkoe and Susanne Balslev Nielsen

Shared space is a design and engineering concept that gains attention in the context of both regeneration of, for example, former production sites and in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

Shared space is a design and engineering concept that gains attention in the context of both regeneration of, for example, former production sites and in the context of designing new building complex(es) with a multifunction strategy. But the practicalities of realising shared space are generally overlooked, despite its importance for the user experience and the degree of success with shared space initiatives. The purpose of this study is to increase the knowledge of shared space and the complex processes involved in realising multiple use of space.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the purpose stated, the paper presents a study of current literature and four cases of shared space, including a commercial building, a public sport facility, a public health centre and an educational building. The study draws on theory from the fields of property management, space management, urban design and architecture, as well as from the social sciences and geography, to provide an as complete picture as possible of the challenges related to shared spaces in practice.

Findings

The result of the study presented is increased knowledge of the processes involved in sharing space in a facilities management context, supported by specific recommendations regarding attention to issues of territoriality, involvement and practicalities.

Originality/value

Not much scientific work has been conducted on the topic of shared space in a facilities management context, and this study adds to the so far limited knowledge within the area.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article

Ju-Young M. Kang

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelationships among fashion lifestyle of social-local-mobile (SoLoMo) consumers as individual characteristics…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the interrelationships among fashion lifestyle of social-local-mobile (SoLoMo) consumers as individual characteristics, perceptions of the value of showrooming and webrooming and omnichannel shopping intention as choice/purchase behavior, and product review sharing intention as a post-purchase behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 601 SoLoMo consumers who were drawn from a US consumer panel. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypothesized model.

Findings

This study found that SoLoMo consumers’ perceptions of the value of showrooming and webrooming were antecedents of their omnichannel shopping intention, which had an influence on their intention to share product reviews. SoLoMo consumers’ brand prestige-based fashion lifestyle did not affect the perceived value of webrooming and had a negative influence on perceived value of showrooming. SoLoMo consumers’ information-based and practicality-based fashion lifestyles affected the perceived value of showrooming and webrooming. Interestingly, SoLoMo consumers’ personality-based fashion lifestyle did not have an influence on the perceived value of showrooming and webrooming.

Originality/value

This study provides the theoretical understanding of the interrelationships among SoLoMo consumers’ fashion lifestyle, perceived value, omnichannel shopping intention and product review sharing intention. This proposed model offers fashion retailers useful insights regarding the development of efficient omnichannel strategies based on SoLoMo consumers’ individual characteristics and perceptions. Finally, the results of this study engender important literature and knowledge related to omnichannel retailing and marketing.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. 23 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

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Article

Peter R. Collins and Russell F. Waugh

This study investigates teacher receptivity to a proposal to relocate Year 7 primary classes to secondary schools in the Western Australia Catholic school system. The…

Abstract

This study investigates teacher receptivity to a proposal to relocate Year 7 primary classes to secondary schools in the Western Australia Catholic school system. The proposal has not yet either been formally promulgated to schools, parents and students or adopted by the Catholic Education Commission. A general model of teacher receptivity to a major planned change in a centralised education system, during the adoption stage, was used to guide the study. The dependent variable, receptivity, was measured in two aspects ‐ an evaluative attitude and behaviour intentions. Three independent variables, general beliefs about the secondary school and perceived readiness to leave primary school, perceived practicality of the change, and the perception that fears and concerns associated with the change will be alleviated, were measured. The environment in which teachers work was measured through the teacher (age, gender, experience, area of expertise and school size) and the school (primary or secondary, size and location), as situation variables, related to the independent variables. Receptivity was found to be strongly and positively related to the perceived practicality of the change and moderately, positively related to perceived readiness of Year 7 students for secondary school. The results are combined with other studies to provide advice to educational administrators about how to adopt and manage this proposed change.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 36 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Keywords

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Executive summary

CUBA/US: Practicalities to blunt impact of new rules

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Book part

Sandra C. Buttigieg, Cheryl Rathert, Thomas A. D’Aunno and Grant T. Savage

This commentary argues in favor of international research in the 21st century. Advances in technology, science, communication, transport, and infrastructure have…

Abstract

Purpose

This commentary argues in favor of international research in the 21st century. Advances in technology, science, communication, transport, and infrastructure have transformed the world into a global village. Industries have increasingly adopted globalization strategies. Likewise, the health sector is more internationalized whereby comparisons between diverse health systems, international best practices, international benchmarking, cross-border health care, and cross-cultural issues have become important subjects in the health care literature. The focus has now turned to international, collaborative, cross-national, and cross-cultural research, which is by far more demanding than domestic studies. In this commentary, we explore the methodological challenges, ethical issues, pitfalls, and practicalities within international research and offer possible solutions to address them.

Design/methodology/approach

The commentary synthesizes contributions from four scholars in the field of health care management, who came together during the annual meeting of the Academy of Management to discuss with members of the Health Care Management Division the challenges of international research.

Findings

International research is worth pursuing; however, it calls for scholarly attention to key methodological and ethical issues for its success.

Originality/value

This commentary addresses salient issues pertaining to international research in one comprehensive account.

Details

International Best Practices in Health Care Management
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-278-4

Keywords

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Book part

Shelley D. Dionne and Peter J. Dionne

In critiquing our levels-based group decision simulation, Wilderman and Salas (2009) suggest that more descriptive decision models and more sophisticated simulation…

Abstract

In critiquing our levels-based group decision simulation, Wilderman and Salas (2009) suggest that more descriptive decision models and more sophisticated simulation techniques would improve the practicality of our model. Black, Oliver, and Paris (2009) employ an agent-based model within an emergent task context to examine a leader's influence on group context for learning and discuss differences in key findings. Although we admit to sins of omission regarding contextual decision theory, we highlight the practicality of our model and contrast this quality with the generalizability of higher-fidelity simulations. Additionally, we admit to sins of envy in that both critiques offer an exciting glimpse into the future of group decision research.

Details

Multi-Level Issues in Organizational Behavior and Leadership
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-503-7

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