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Article
Publication date: 19 July 2022

Djonata Schiessl, Jose Korelo and Helison Bertoli Alves Dias

Due to increasing use of the Internet to purchase products, this article aimed to investigate how poor experiences during online purchases lead consumers to perform webrooming.

Abstract

Purpose

Due to increasing use of the Internet to purchase products, this article aimed to investigate how poor experiences during online purchases lead consumers to perform webrooming.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors performed three laboratory experiments and analyzed secondary data to investigate this issue.

Findings

The findings revealed that (a) poor online experiences increased consumers' intentions to perform webrooming (studies 1, 2 and 3); (b) frustration is a mechanism that explains why consumers choose to perform webrooming in the same or rival stores (Studies 1, 2 and 3); (c) Perceived channel integration increases consumer's intentions to perform webrooming in the same retailer (study 3).

Originality/value

This research contributes to webrooming literature by highlighting one more antecedent of this behavior and its psychological mechanism. To the authors’ knowledge, this research is the first one shedding light on the differentiation between webrooming in the same or rival stores. The findings also complement omnichannel literature by exploring how poor experiences and frustration change channel preferences. Finally, the article demonstrated how managers could retain consumers by improving channel integration.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 May 2022

Amit Shankar and Sheetal Jain

The purpose of the current study is to examine why luxury consumers webroom. The study further examines the intervening effects of social norms, age, and gender.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the current study is to examine why luxury consumers webroom. The study further examines the intervening effects of social norms, age, and gender.

Design/methodology/approach

A cross-sectional data from 374 Indian luxury consumers was collected using questionnaire surveys. Confirmatory factor analysis, covariance-based structural equation modeling and PROCESS macro were used to analyze the data.

Findings

Findings suggest that perceived usefulness of searching online, sales-staff assistance, socialization, and need for touch have significant positive effect on attitude toward webrooming. The moderation effect findings suggest that subjective norm significantly moderates the association between attitude toward webrooming and webrooming intention.

Practical implications

Practically, the findings are likely to aid luxury marketers in designing effective channel strategies to maximize their reach via both offline and online channel.

Originality/value

This study provides several contributions to the luxury marketing and retailing literature by examining luxury consumers' webrooming intention.

Details

Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-2026

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 November 2021

Yan Guo, Min Zhang and Valerie Lynette Wang

This study examines consumers' channel attitudes and choices leading to webrooming and showrooming, and how product attributes (informational vs experiential and perceived…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines consumers' channel attitudes and choices leading to webrooming and showrooming, and how product attributes (informational vs experiential and perceived risk) moderate the effects of channel attitudes.

Design/methodology/approach

A research framework is built upon the heterogeneity of channel attitudes, the lack of intrachannel lock-in and interchannel synergy. A questionnaire-based survey yields 868 multi-channel consumer responses in China. Simultaneous equation modeling and STATA 12.0 are used to test the hypotheses.

Findings

Consumers webroom when buying high-risk informational products (e.g. personal computers or mobile phones). They webroom as well as showroom for high-risk experiential products (e.g. clothing or cosmetics). Moreover, a single channel is preferred to webrooming or showrooming for purchasing low-risk informational (e.g. books or stationery) and low-risk experiential (e.g. snacks or toys) products. The results also show that webrooming is more frequently used than showrooming by consumers.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends current understanding on multi-channel and omnichannel shopping behavior and highlights the role of product attributes in customer journey mapping.

Practical implications

This study offers retailers and other downstream firms a fresh perspective on multi-channel customer experience management and channel design.

Originality/value

This study offers a clear explanation on the commonalities and differences between webrooming and showrooming.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Sourabh Arora, Sangeeta Sahney and Debasis Pradhan

This purpose of this paper is to extend the model of goal-directed behaviour by including the potential benefits of webrooming and descriptive norms to scrutinise the…

Abstract

Purpose

This purpose of this paper is to extend the model of goal-directed behaviour by including the potential benefits of webrooming and descriptive norms to scrutinise the consumer's rationale and intent behind webrooming.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was employed to collect the data. A total of 324 usable responses were obtained, and the structural equation modelling technique was used for analysis.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that consumers utilised the information collected online to strike better deals offline. Also, webrooming not only stimulated smart shopper feelings amongst shoppers but also assisted them in avoiding certain risks associated with shopping online. Besides, support was also garnered for informative and possession benefits linked with webrooming. The findings demonstrated the positive impact of attitude, anticipated emotions and perceived behavioural control on desire, which in turn positively determined the intentions. Significant mediation impact was also observed between attitude and intentions via desire. However, past behaviour was evidenced to impact only intentions. Surprisingly, descriptive norms emerged as a stronger predictor of consumers' desire as opposed to subjective norms, which was found to be insignificant.

Research limitations/implications

Information search and switching costs associated with webrooming have not been considered in this study. A larger sample size would help draw broader generalisations.

Practical implications

While online retailers can utilise the findings of the study to convert webrooming shoppers into buyers, alternatively, offline stores can use the key insights to retain webroomers. Additionally, educators can use the findings of the study to teach the students about the changing retailing dynamics.

Originality/value

The present study emerges as the first one to incorporate cognitive, affective and habitual factors collectively for a better understanding of the webrooming phenomenon.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 14 January 2021

Amit Shankar

The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of convenience on banking consumers' webrooming intention. To fulfil this objective, this study empirically investigates…

1085

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this study is to evaluate the impact of convenience on banking consumers' webrooming intention. To fulfil this objective, this study empirically investigates how convenience impacts consumers' webrooming intention, using a comprehensive moderated–mediation framework. The study investigates the mediating effects of perceived hedonic values and perceived utilitarian values and how these mediating effects are moderated by consumers' perceived security concerns.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a questionnaire-based offline survey from 534 banking users in India, using systematic sampling. The covariance-based structural equation modelling and PROCESS macro were used to examine the hypotheses.

Findings

The results indicated that access convenience, search convenience, benefit convenience and post-benefit convenience have a crucial impact on consumers' webrooming intention. The perceived hedonic values and perceived utilitarian values mediate the effects of convenience dimensions on webrooming intention, and mediation effects varied between high and low levels of consumers' perceived security concern.

Research limitations/implications

This study was conducted in India using cross-sectional data. The proposed model can be replicated in other countries using longitudinal data for generalising the findings.

Practical implications

The study's findings will help banks identify how to enhance convenience to manage channel-switching behaviour.

Originality/value

Webrooming”, a key channel-switching concern in a multichannel banking context is investigated by examining the impact of convenience dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 39 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 10 July 2017

Sourabh Arora and Sangeeta Sahney

Recent statistics on increasing webrooming customers make it topical in the multi-channel retailing domain. The purpose of this paper is to offer an enhanced understanding…

3827

Abstract

Purpose

Recent statistics on increasing webrooming customers make it topical in the multi-channel retailing domain. The purpose of this paper is to offer an enhanced understanding on “Webrooming behaviour”, an area of concern for e-retailers by proposing an integrated framework grounded on the Theory of planned behaviour and Technology acceptance model.

Design/methodology/approach

The conceptual model presented develops a number of propositions applicable to webrooming behaviour utilizing the rich literature on channel choice behaviour in the multi-channel retailing environment. The propositions are open for verification and can serve the basis for future line of research.

Findings

The model proposed provides basis for understanding the webrooming sequence via search attitude towards online channels, purchase attitude towards offline channels, perceived ease of online search and perceived usefulness of webrooming behaviour. The impact of online risk perceptions and mediating role of (lack of) “trust” have been proposed along with the direct impact of product type and category which offers an holistic view towards understanding the webrooming conduct.

Research limitations/implications

The model proposed lacks empirical verification. There is a need to test the model empirically to validate the model and to find out the suitability of integrated TPB-TAM model.

Practical implications

Webrooming substantially erodes online profits. Before retailers’ strategies to defend webroomers, it is imperative to understand the phenomenon from the consumer’s side. The model proposed is a step in this direction and provides the basis for formulating strategies for holding back the webroomers.

Originality/value

This paper adds to the body of knowledge in retailing by proposing a conceptual model on webrooming behaviour which is an emerging area of research in the present retail landscape.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 29 October 2018

Sourabh Arora and Sangeeta Sahney

Recent statistics concerning webrooming shoppers is indicative of the trending webrooming phenomenon, and points toward the dire need for the addressal of the issue. The…

1658

Abstract

Purpose

Recent statistics concerning webrooming shoppers is indicative of the trending webrooming phenomenon, and points toward the dire need for the addressal of the issue. The purpose of this paper is to reason the consumer’s intentional visit to an online store prior to making purchases offline by linking it with perceived channel benefits and uncertainty reduction approach through an application of the theory of planned behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey instrument was administered online, and a total of 374 responses were obtained. Respondents were queried with respect to the webrooming sequence, if at all they were into webrooming. The PLS-SEM was used to test the formulated hypotheses.

Findings

The factor “Access to reviews online” emerged as the prime perceived search benefit which drives consumers’ to first visit an online store, while factors like “access to touch and feel the product,” “better post-purchase services offline” and “immediate possession of product” induced customers to later purchase offline. Factors like “E-distrust” and “perceived risks related to purchasing online” notably determined consumer’s movement to the physical store for purchasing the product in the second phase of the webrooming sequence.

Research limitations/implications

A small sample size limits the authors from drawing definitive generalizations. Due to the lack of studies, individually examining webrooming conduct, a prior qualitative exploration can be conducted to draw more insights.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can be utilized by the online retailers for devising strategies to push the webroomers to make purchases online.

Social implications

The study creates awareness as to what motivates consumers to webroom, which has been realized as one of the serious issues being faced by the online retailers today.

Originality/value

This study addresses a key concern “webrooming phenomenon,” which has emerged as a critical challenge in the present retailing dynamics.

Details

Asia Pacific Journal of Marketing and Logistics, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-5855

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 July 2019

Eugene Cheng-Xi Aw

The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically test a model encompassing antecedents of webrooming, an emerging shopping behaviour in omnichannel retailing. This…

2365

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to propose and empirically test a model encompassing antecedents of webrooming, an emerging shopping behaviour in omnichannel retailing. This study delineates the impacts of shopping motivation, perceived channel-related benefits and costs on webrooming intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire-based survey was conducted using a purposive sampling technique. A total of 300 responses were collected, and data were analysed using Partial Least Square Structural Equation Modelling.

Findings

Shopping motivation, such as efficiency shopping and bargain hunting, negatively influenced webrooming intention. Immediate possession positively influenced webrooming intention. With regard to perceived costs of webrooming, purchase effort and expected price loss negatively influenced webrooming intention. An additional exploratory analysis uncovered the moderating role of efficiency shopping.

Originality/value

This study provides empirical evidence for the antecedents of webrooming intention and expands the understanding of this emerging yet largely unexplored cross-channel behaviour.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 47 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 19 March 2019

Sourabh Arora and Sangeeta Sahney

The purpose of this paper is to employ an integrated technology acceptance model–theory of planned behavior framework intertwined with online risk, e-distrust and product…

1396

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to employ an integrated technology acceptance model–theory of planned behavior framework intertwined with online risk, e-distrust and product involvement to augment an understanding on consumers’ webrooming behavior.

Design/methodology/approach

A mix of convenience and selective sampling was used for data collection. A total of 14 propositions were put forth, which were tested using the structural equation modeling method.

Findings

The results of the study revealed that apart from perceived ease of searching online and overall usefulness of the webrooming sequence, perceived search benefits online and purchase benefits offline significantly determined consumers’ webrooming behavior. The results of the study also indicate that webrooming helps consumers avoid the feeling of post-purchase regret of making sub-optimal product choices offline. Online risk perceptions and e-distrust also play a notable role in inhibiting consumers’ from making online purchases, and as a consequence encourage webrooming behavior. The moderating influence of product involvement was observed between consumers’ intentions toward webrooming and webrooming behavior.

Research limitations/implications

The research conducted provides rich insights into understanding the rising webrooming phenomenon. However, more exhaustive studies are needed to arrive at definitive findings concerning the webrooming phenomenon.

Practical implications

The findings of the study can be utilized by the online retailers for formulating strategies to counter webrooming behavior.

Originality/value

The paper is amongst the first few studies which contribute toward enhancing the understanding on webrooming behavior, an emerging issue in the current retailing environment.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 July 2022

Subhadip Roy, Kirti Sharma and Sharuti Choudhary

The concepts of showrooming and webrooming have been well researched but majorly from the marketing/economic perspectives. The present study explores the…

Abstract

Purpose

The concepts of showrooming and webrooming have been well researched but majorly from the marketing/economic perspectives. The present study explores the socio-psychological motivations and different types of satisfaction derived from “cross-shopping” behaviour namely, showrooming and webrooming in a developing nation.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is exploratory and is conducted using an interpretive approach. The researchers conducted 52 in-depth interviews and the collected data were subjected to open and axial coding to generate the conceptual model.

Findings

The findings indicate various motivations of cross-shopping such a habit and the joy of discovery while novel aspects of satisfaction emerge such as process satisfaction and social satisfaction. The findings also revealed contextual moderators of the cross-shopping process.

Research limitations/implications

The present study contributes to the domain of cross shopping behaviour by illustrating the social motivators behind the same and novel satisfaction outcomes because of the cross-shopping process.

Practical implications

The present study has multiple implications that would enable managers to effectively utilize cross shopping behaviour such understanding of satisfaction beyond those derived from the product only.

Originality/value

This is one of the first studies to investigate consumer behaviour related to cross shopping based on psycho-social dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of 140