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Article
Publication date: 5 February 2018

Susanne Balslev Nielsen and Rikke Brinkø

This study aims to investigate the attitude towards shared space in an urban context with a particular focus on meeting facilities. The Lyngby-Taarbæk City of Knowledge is…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the attitude towards shared space in an urban context with a particular focus on meeting facilities. The Lyngby-Taarbæk City of Knowledge is used as a case, as this organisation has a vision of sharing facilities to stimulate regional development.

Design/methodology/approach

The attitude towards shared space in the Lyngby-Taarbæk City of Knowledge is studied in a three-step qualitative research process. An initial survey investigated the City of Knowledge’s members’ attitude towards shared space in general, a workshop further explored motivations and practical needs and a second survey investigated the attitude towards shared meeting facilities. The Brinkø Typology of Shared Use of Space and Facilities is used as the theoretical framework for the study (Brinkø et al., 2015).

Findings

This study shows that the respondents are very positive towards the concept of shared space but more reluctant when it comes to sharing own facilities. A majority of the informants are often using externally owned facilities for meetings and events and prefer professional meeting facilities to schools, universities and sports facilities. This points to a need for developing relevant service concepts, if a shared space strategy with focus on meeting facilities were to be used to increase the use rate of existing buildings not already intended for this use.

Originality/value

This study adds to the so far limited amount of scientific knowledge on the topic of shared space, by investigating the attitude towards shared space among a specific group of people, in relation to the use of external meeting facilities.

Details

Facilities, vol. 36 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2015

Rikke Brinkø, Susanne Balslev Nielsen and Juriaan van Meel

This paper aims to explore shared use of space and facilities as a concept, and present and illustrate the use of a typology to help classify and describe the different…

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1078

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore shared use of space and facilities as a concept, and present and illustrate the use of a typology to help classify and describe the different options for sharing space and facilities within buildings for optimised use of a building portfolio.

Design/methodology/approach

The content presented is based on a cross-sectional study with an inductive approach. The results are based partly on secondary data in the form of a literature review and a mapping of 20 examples from Europe, USA and Australia, and partly on primary data from observations and interviews with key actors from two cases in Denmark and an illustration case from Ireland.

Findings

The typology classifies and describes four archetypes of sharing between different people, building owners and organisations, to be used when discussing, planning, establishing and evaluating new and existing shared spaces.

Research limitations/implications

The typology is the result of a first exploration of shared use of facilities and does not claim to be fully comprehensive or final.

Practical implications

The typology is intended for both researchers and practitioners, and aims at increasing the understanding of sharing as a way to minimise the need for building new by better utilisation of the existing building stock.

Originality/value

Shared space and facilities is a relatively new topic with not much research undertaken. This typology provides a language for discussing shared spaces and a base for further developing the research field.

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2017

Rikke Brinkoe and Susanne Balslev Nielsen

The purpose of this study is through collaboration with practitioners to identify key characteristics of municipal shared spaces and, based on these, developing a guide…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is through collaboration with practitioners to identify key characteristics of municipal shared spaces and, based on these, developing a guide for establishing a shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper builds on existing theory on the subject of shared space as well as the practical experience of professionals within the fields of property management, space management and facilities management. The guide presented is the result of data collected through case studies, interviews, surveys and literature reviews. This knowledge is combined with data collected through a workshop with practitioners from municipalities and the private sector, to provide a final guide that is directly applicable as a tool for working with shared space as a part of a property management strategy.

Findings

The result presented is a guide to establishing a shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio, created in collaboration between researchers and practitioners. It provides an introduction to the topic and outlines a number of tasks that must be completed in different parts of a project, thereby providing a tool which practitioners can use to realise shared space as a strategy in the context of public real-estate management.

Originality/value

The guide presented is a first in connecting theory with practical application and through collaboration between researchers and practitioners, creating a tool to be used when working with shared space in a municipal real-estate portfolio.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 8 May 2018

Rikke Brinkoe and Susanne Balslev Nielsen

Shared space is a design and engineering concept that gains attention in the context of both regeneration of, for example, former production sites and in the context of…

Abstract

Purpose

Shared space is a design and engineering concept that gains attention in the context of both regeneration of, for example, former production sites and in the context of designing new building complex(es) with a multifunction strategy. But the practicalities of realising shared space are generally overlooked, despite its importance for the user experience and the degree of success with shared space initiatives. The purpose of this study is to increase the knowledge of shared space and the complex processes involved in realising multiple use of space.

Design/methodology/approach

To achieve the purpose stated, the paper presents a study of current literature and four cases of shared space, including a commercial building, a public sport facility, a public health centre and an educational building. The study draws on theory from the fields of property management, space management, urban design and architecture, as well as from the social sciences and geography, to provide an as complete picture as possible of the challenges related to shared spaces in practice.

Findings

The result of the study presented is increased knowledge of the processes involved in sharing space in a facilities management context, supported by specific recommendations regarding attention to issues of territoriality, involvement and practicalities.

Originality/value

Not much scientific work has been conducted on the topic of shared space in a facilities management context, and this study adds to the so far limited knowledge within the area.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2016

Iman Khajehzadeh and Brenda Vale

In Iran, as elsewhere, a great number of student dormitory-style buildings have been built with shared rooms either side of a central corridor as a simple and affordable…

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1022

Abstract

Purpose

In Iran, as elsewhere, a great number of student dormitory-style buildings have been built with shared rooms either side of a central corridor as a simple and affordable building form. Highly populated shared rooms with common facilities in such buildings can produce problems in terms of personal space but, at the same time, have many advantages for social interactions and better use of resources, which is a feature of sustainability. Most of these buildings are old and need fundamental refurbishment. This study aims to provide some guidelines to improve advantages and control disadvantages of this building type for future refurbishment and new developments.

Design/methodology/approach

The advantages and disadvantages of shared spaces have been analysed using a Post Occupancy Evaluation approach in a case study which is representative of more than 30 university dormitories in Iran. Interview, observation and questionnaire survey tools are used in this study.

Findings

Results show students have some problems regarding privacy, interaction, security, noise, circulation, access hierarchy, storage spaces, use of rooms and territory definition.

Practical implications

Based on the results of the study, some design suggestions are made for more efficient shared spaces for future designs and also for improving the case study dormitory, in terms of both access hierarchy and internal room arrangements.

Originality/value

Post Occupancy Evaluation has not previously been used to provide guidelines for architects to improve the quality of design according to existing functional/behavioural problems in similar buildings.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 24 September 2021

Muhammad Mahmood Aslam, Ricarda Bouncken and Lars Görmar

Coworking-spaces are considered as a new formula to facilitate autonomy, creativity, self-efficacy, work satisfaction and innovation, yet they also might overburden their…

Abstract

Purpose

Coworking-spaces are considered as a new formula to facilitate autonomy, creativity, self-efficacy, work satisfaction and innovation, yet they also might overburden their users who in that course intend to limit social interaction and collaboration in the workspace. Thus, the question is how coworking-spaces shape entrepreneurial ventures.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used an inductive research methodology based on data from three different data sources, including observations, archives and interviews from managers and entrepreneurs.

Findings

The findings suggest that the materiality in the form of spatial architectures (working, socialization and support structures) shared facilities and infrastructures (utilities, luxuries and specialties), and integrated digital technologies (applications and platforms) influence the flow of communication, internal and external linkages, as well as functional uniformity and distinctiveness. However, there exists an inherent dualism in sociomaterial assemblage in coworking-spaces, which can lead to instrumental and detrimental outcomes for entrepreneurs.

Originality/value

This study explains the role of sociomaterial assemblage on the working of entrepreneurs in shared workspaces.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 27 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 8 December 2020

Yaoyi Zhou and Ying Hua

The purpose of this paper is to study whether the use of a shared study space played a role in shaping graduate students’ social networks by exploring how the copresence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study whether the use of a shared study space played a role in shaping graduate students’ social networks by exploring how the copresence in space was related to the structure of friendship and advice networks. The authors first proposed two concepts of spatial copresence: measured spatial-temporal copresence and perceived copresence. The authors then examined the role of copresence through a case study of a shared study space occupied by 27 graduate students in the same department.

Design/methodology/approach

Copresence relations were first constructed through a six-month room access history data set and self-reported data to examine whether measured spatial-temporal copresence was consistent with perceived copresence. Friendship and advice network relations were then analyzed with copresence, social media connections, class project collaboration relations and social homophily (nationality, gender, cohort) through quadratic assignment procedure (QAP) and MQAP analysis.

Findings

The authors found that students who used the shared study space more often reported more friendship and advice ties. The perceived copresence and the measured spatial-temporal copresence were highly correlated. Copresence relations, as measured by survey and room access history, were both significantly correlated with advice relation, which was associated with perceived social support.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the debate about whether “space” continues to play significant roles in graduate students’ social networks in the context of flexible learning environments. The results also reveal new directions for research methods in studying spatial proximity in flexible settings.

Details

Journal of Facilities Management , vol. 19 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-5967

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 4 September 2019

Ricarda Bouncken and Muhammad Mahmood Aslam

Coworking spaces use the idea of spatial co-location that improves communication and knowledge sharing among independent knowledge professionals. Fluid work structures and…

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1092

Abstract

Purpose

Coworking spaces use the idea of spatial co-location that improves communication and knowledge sharing among independent knowledge professionals. Fluid work structures and a sense of community can facilitate work satisfaction, creativity and entrepreneurship. Fundamentals to those positive outcomes are the knowledge sharing processes between users of coworking spaces. The purpose of this study is to explore the knowledge sharing processes in this setting where researchers still have very little understanding.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on an inductive research methodology, qualitative data were collected through observations and interviews with a variety of users (including freelancers, entrepreneurs and firms) incumbent in various coworking spaces in Germany.

Findings

Co-location of individuals in coworking spaces is first about physical proximity and second about socialization and collaboration opportunities, which then advance cognitive proximity. Thus, co-location can facilitate tacit knowledge exchange, ignite the social disembodiment of ideas, synthesize domain-related knowledge sharing and promote inter-domain learning. The institutionalization of knowledge management services will allow coworking spaces to increase these positive outcomes.

Practical implications

Findings of this study are interesting for managers of shared spaces and traditional firms that use spatial co-location. The authors propose institutionalized knowledge management services to enable multifaceted and multidisciplinary knowledge creation in organizations.

Originality/value

This paper sheds light on the role of spatial co-location in knowledge sharing processes among independent knowledge professionals in shared office spaces. Thereby, this study provides valuable insights into a phenomenon that has received little attention even though its practical importance is high.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 23 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 8 August 2019

Kayo Tajima

This study aims to analyze whether and how condominium shared utilities and facilities (e.g. community spaces), of which buyers assume a share of the ownership upon…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to analyze whether and how condominium shared utilities and facilities (e.g. community spaces), of which buyers assume a share of the ownership upon acquisition of a residential unit, affect the condominium unit price over time.

Design/methodology/approach

The transaction price of each unit reflects the quality of the residential unit and the properties of the shared facilities. Based on the hedonic pricing method, this study assesses the impact of shared amenities on unit resale prices, using an original data set on condominium unit resale transactions and the status of housing characteristics for both condominium units and condominium buildings.

Findings

Results show that holding other conditions constant, a meeting room and an external space that can host events increase the unit resale price by approximately 7 and 16 per cent, respectively. Some community amenities such as a meeting room may increase its impact later in the condominium’s lifetime.

Research limitations/implications

Because of the proprietary nature of data, the analysis focuses on high-end condominium properties in central Tokyo. Although it is difficult to single out the shared amenities’ effects on condominium resale prices from potentially confounding factors, this study partially overcomes this issue by including explanatory geographical variables (e.g. ground heights).

Practical implications

The results suggest that a shared facility that hosts social interactions among residents significantly affects the resale market value of housing units and that their magnitudes may change over time.

Originality/value

To the best of the author’s knowledge, this study provides the first empirical evidence of the impacts of shared structures on condominium unit sales using micro-level transaction data in Japan.

Details

International Journal of Housing Markets and Analysis, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8270

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Minou Weijs-Perrée, Rianne Appel-Meulenbroek, Theo Arentze and Georges Romme

Knowledge sharing is a process where individuals mutually exchange knowledge to create new knowledge. Understanding the knowledge-sharing process, during which…

Abstract

Purpose

Knowledge sharing is a process where individuals mutually exchange knowledge to create new knowledge. Understanding the knowledge-sharing process, during which organizations share spaces, facilities and services, is highly important for owners/managers who seek to optimize their business centres and to attract more innovative tenants. For users of business centres, it is interesting to know how, where and what type of knowledge is shared. However, there is hardly any research into sharing different types of knowledge in business centres. The purpose of this paper is to analyse the influence of personal and organizational characteristics on sharing different types of knowledge within and between organizations in business centres.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a questionnaire that was completed by 268 users of 53 business centres in The Netherlands. A seemingly unrelated regression analysis was used to simultaneously analyse the influence of personal and organizational characteristics on knowledge sharing in business centres.

Findings

The results show that public and private non-codified knowledge is more frequently shared with people from other organizations by those who more frequently use an event space, lounge space, canteen or consultancy services. Knowledge sharing with colleagues within organizations was influenced by the use of individual closed workspaces, meeting spaces and restaurant/canteen and gender.

Originality/value

The study suggests that owners and managers of business centres can optimize their business centres by offering specific facilities, services and workspaces to attract a specific group of tenants. In addition, organizations that want to enhance knowledge sharing with other organizations need to stimulate their employees to use shared facilities and services.

Details

Facilities, vol. 37 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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