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Book part
Publication date: 22 November 2017

Ali Taleb, Catalin Ratiu and Rick Molz

In this study, we explored the behaviour of two Canadian multinational companies operating in the context of Arab Spring events in Egypt in 2011.

Abstract

Purpose

In this study, we explored the behaviour of two Canadian multinational companies operating in the context of Arab Spring events in Egypt in 2011.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a fine-grained analysis of 171 documents of various secondary sources to understand the behaviour of the two firms in Egypt between 25 January 2011 and 30 June 2012.

Findings

We suggest that corporate diplomacy should be viewed as portfolios of interdependent actions rather than reactions to discrete events. We also underline the importance for organisations to have a proactive, holistic and inclusive corporate diplomacy strategy, with the objective to secure and balance both explicit political/legal licence and implicit social licence.

Research limitations/implications

We intentionally focused our empirical analysis on two Canadian firms operating in the same host country and belonging to the same industry. It would be useful to carry similar research in different organisational and institutional contexts.

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

James R. Stock and Douglas M. Lambert

The International Physical Distribution Environment Involvement in international markets requires an awareness of the variables — both controllable and uncontrollable …

Abstract

The International Physical Distribution Environment Involvement in international markets requires an awareness of the variables — both controllable and uncontrollable — which impact on a firm's distribution network. Political, legal, social and economic conditions, market structure and competition and the level of distribution technology available are all uncontrollable factors which influence a firm's distribution planning. Strategy must be directed towards administering physical distribution components so as to minimise costs and provide an acceptable level of customer service. Companies should acknowledge the differences that exist between domestic and foreign activities, and within overseas markets, country variations, regarding levels of customer service and inventory and transportation facilities that can be provided and the associated costs involved. Key managerial elements include packaging and labelling and warehousing and storage facilities dependent upon distribution systems required. Channel of Distribution Strategies Besides market potential, there are a number of reasons for entering international markets — an advanced domestic product life cycle, excess capacity, less internal overseas competition, geographical diversification and, perhaps, for materials/components saving. Four principle strategies for overseas involvement are available: exporting, licencing, joint ventures and ownership. In general firms may follow more than one strategy between markets and as circumstances change in individual market areas. Management of the Export Shipment Export distributors, customs house brokers and foreign freight forwarders are amongst the major organisations involved in exporting activity. Documentation remains of paramount importance. Operating in an unfamiliar financial environment, it is essential that account is taken of exchange rates, tax considerations, levels of inflation and other financial aspects affecting physical distribution; all will impact on profit levels and, if mismanaged or overlooked, will generate losses. Managing International Physical Distribution Activities International distribution management is complex. Success requires the correct answers to a number of difficult issues in order to develop the optimal distribution system for each target market. Planning, implementation and control of all international physical distribution activities is essential to the success of any foreign marketing efforts.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

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Article
Publication date: 28 June 2011

Peter Curwen

Abstract

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info, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2003

Sameer Prasad and Jasmine Tata

Quality management practices have recently flourished across the globe. In this research we review and integrate the literature by identifying and organizing significant…

Abstract

Quality management practices have recently flourished across the globe. In this research we review and integrate the literature by identifying and organizing significant research findings, and develop a conceptual model of the relationships between international environmental conditions (e.g. socio‐cultural, political‐legal, economic, and educational factors) and dimensions of quality management (e.g. strategic quality planning, customer focus and satisfaction, human resource development and management, information and analysis, management of process quality, and quality and operational results). The model developed here helps us move beyond examining the differences in quality practices across countries to an understanding of why such differences occur, and helps practitioners gain a better perspective on how quality management techniques can be adopted in different regions around the world.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2019

Dushar Kamini Dayarathna, Peter John Dowling and Timothy Bartram

This paper aims to examine the implications of high performance work system (HPWS) strength from a managerial perspective and the impact of economic, cultural, political

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the implications of high performance work system (HPWS) strength from a managerial perspective and the impact of economic, cultural, political, legal and technological factors on the operationalization of HPWSs in the banking industry in Sri Lanka.

Design/methodology/approach

The data for this study were collected from three licensed commercial banks in Sri Lanka. This research used a case study approach for data collection with archival analysis of records and semi-structured interviews with the CEO, head of HR, two board members and three focus groups (top, middle and lower level managers across various functional areas) in each bank which altogether covers 66 key informants.

Findings

The findings supported the research proposition that to gain positive outcomes on organizational effectiveness, there should be a strong HPWS, resulting in a positive attitudinal climate among employees. Further, the findings provide evidence of the global applicability of HPWSs, although more research is needed to clearly specify the contextual boundaries of HPWS effectiveness.

Originality/value

Contemporary research provides ample evidence to endorse the contribution of high performance work systems toward organizational effectiveness. However, there is a dearth of literature on how high performance work systems are operationalized across the management hierarchy and support the achievement of organizational effectiveness. Few studies have been conducted on high performance work system strength and organizational effectiveness in emerging economies.

Details

Review of International Business and Strategy, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2059-6014

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

John B. Meisel and Timothy S. Sullivan

Business as usual in the music industry is over. Online music is a force to be reckoned with now and increasingly in the future. This paper first describes the current…

Abstract

Business as usual in the music industry is over. Online music is a force to be reckoned with now and increasingly in the future. This paper first describes the current revenue streams and cost causers that characterize the traditional business model in the music industry. Then, the impact of the Internet on the current business model is described, especially as it relates to the distribution stage of the value chain in the record business. Also, the impact of the Internet’s disruption of the distribution stage on the state of existing copyright law, as manifested through the introduction of Napster’s peer‐to‐peer innovation, is explained. Third, an analysis of salient economic, political/legal, and technological issues arising from these changes on the entire industry is presented. Finally, the paper identifies characteristics of a viable business model in the music industry and offers lessons for other digital content industries.

Details

info, vol. 4 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6697

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Article
Publication date: 25 February 2019

Daniel Rottig, Sebastian Muscarella and Rui Torres de Oliveira

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the formal political, legal and economic institutional legitimacy challenges for (US-based) multinational corporations (MNCs…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyze the formal political, legal and economic institutional legitimacy challenges for (US-based) multinational corporations (MNCs) attempting to enter the Cuban market, discuss the key local constituencies in Cuba that are able to grant legitimacy and sketch out respective strategies to deal with each of these formal institutional challenges.

Design/methodology/approach

A qualitative research approach comprising semi-structured executive interviews was used, combined with the analysis of media accounts and recent governmental policies and developments. The authors interpreted the gathered data and information based on institutional theory.

Findings

This paper sketches out specific legitimacy challenges for (US-based) MNCs when entering Cuba and discusses strategies to manage these challenges.

Research limitations/implications

The authors provide an application of institutional theory in the specific context of Cuba and so demonstrate the value of applying this theoretical lens to better understand the local legitimacy processes in this particular emerging market environment.

Practical implications

This study presents a framework of strategies (US-based) MNCs may use to inform their entry strategies into the Cuban market, based on an analysis of the local institutional environment, legitimacy pressures and constituencies able to grant or withdraw the approval and support of foreign MNCs.

Originality/value

This paper is an original application of institutional theory to the emerging market of Cuba using a qualitative research approach, and so contributes to an emerging stream of research studying this market context from an academic and practical perspective.

Details

International Journal of Emerging Markets, vol. 15 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-8809

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Book part
Publication date: 20 January 2011

Khutula Sibanda, Ronel Erwee and Eric Ng

This study identifies key variables that contribute most to the discrimination between firms with high export performance levels and those with low export performance…

Abstract

This study identifies key variables that contribute most to the discrimination between firms with high export performance levels and those with low export performance levels. Data were collected through a structured multi-item questionnaire involving a randomly selected sample of 105 exporting firms. Discriminant analysis was used to identify the key discriminating variables. Exporters with high-performance levels differed significantly from those with low levels. Strategy implementation, experience in international business and training, economic factors, size of the firm, cultural factors, strategic orientation, education, and political/legal factors, listed in order of importance, were identified as key discriminators between the two types of firms.

Details

International Marketing
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-85724-448-2

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2003

Georgios I. Zekos

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination…

Abstract

Aim of the present monograph is the economic analysis of the role of MNEs regarding globalisation and digital economy and in parallel there is a reference and examination of some legal aspects concerning MNEs, cyberspace and e‐commerce as the means of expression of the digital economy. The whole effort of the author is focused on the examination of various aspects of MNEs and their impact upon globalisation and vice versa and how and if we are moving towards a global digital economy.

Details

Managerial Law, vol. 45 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0558

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 2001

J. Eric Davies

Abstract

Details

Library Management, vol. 22 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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