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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

Donald V. Shiner

Despite 40 years of research by many social science disciplines, the conduct of planning in the business firm is not well modelled or understood. For marketers, this…

4750

Abstract

Despite 40 years of research by many social science disciplines, the conduct of planning in the business firm is not well modelled or understood. For marketers, this presents a particularly important problem. Marketing planning is particularly susceptible to the heirarchical nature of the planning process and the need to develop both deliberate and emergent plans. Since marketers provide the interface between the firm and its markets and customers, they must provide the essential strategic and tactical planning direction to the firm's overall strategic planning process. Marketing planning has a strategic and tactical component. Marketers must be precise with their use of terminology, being careful to identify exactly what they mean when they use the terms planning, marketing and strategy.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 22 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1983

Arthur Meidan

Eight different bank marketing strategies are grouped into two broad categories: growth and competitive strategies. The author indicates various marketing strategies

2855

Abstract

Eight different bank marketing strategies are grouped into two broad categories: growth and competitive strategies. The author indicates various marketing strategies, suggesting some of the alternative strategies suitable for different banks, emphasising the criteria on the basis of which marketing strategy selection can be made.

Details

International Journal of Bank Marketing, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-2323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 July 1997

D. Steven White and David A. Griffith

Outlines effective corporate strategymarketing strategy relationships in the context of a behavioural segmentation framework for competing in the global marketplace…

11177

Abstract

Outlines effective corporate strategymarketing strategy relationships in the context of a behavioural segmentation framework for competing in the global marketplace. Evaluates standard, local and regional market strategies in conjunction with cost‐based, customer‐based and innovation‐based corporate strategies. Highlights key corporate strategymarketing strategy combinations in a global strategic marketing decision tree. These combinations enhance an organization’s ability to compete effectively in global consumer markets. Utilizes corporate examples to emphasize the effectiveness of these combinations. The premiss of this paper is that corporate strategy drives marketing strategy. Concludes that by recognizing the complex interrelationships between corporate and marketing strategy, organizations may achieve global strategic competitiveness.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 15 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Owain Prys Jenkins

Shows how the development of a marketing strategy within English wine can be used to promote greater sales and also dispel the problems of European Regulation. Highlights…

Abstract

Shows how the development of a marketing strategy within English wine can be used to promote greater sales and also dispel the problems of European Regulation. Highlights the case for hybrid wines and the need for an approved quality wine scheme which would work hand in hand with a quasi co‐op system. Discusses the components of a successful marketing strategy illustrated through a case study which concludes that there is a recognized place for English wine within the market once a marketing strategy is adopted and pricing techniques reviewed.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 4 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 5 July 2011

Amalesh Sharma

The purpose of this research is to study the emerging nature of on‐line marketing and define the next generation strategies for online marketers.

17848

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to study the emerging nature of on‐line marketing and define the next generation strategies for online marketers.

Design/methodology/approach

It is a qualitative research to explain a few factors. Surveys were conducted to determine the view points of consumers. Existing literature and current trends are considered

Findings

On the basis of the study, author has tried to forecast certain major factors and strategic approaches, which will dominate the on‐line marketing world in the near future.

Research limitations/implications

It is difficult to predict trends. Extreme technological revolution, huge changes in market dynamics, economy of the nations and few other factors may affect the trends suddenly. So the intensity of the result may vary with time.

Practical implications:

It will add value to the strategic thinking of the organizations. Especially for the start‐ups firms and for the firms, which are following the traditional on‐line marketing strategies, it will give a new outlook.

Originality/value

The paper attempts to showing the critical factors, which are neglected while building the online marketing strategies. Also, author tries to show the original market trends and the necessity of innovative strategies

Details

Business Strategy Series, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-5637

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1988

William D. Presutti

Just‐in‐time manufacturing is one of the most important management developments of the last decade and a half. Articles on the subject have virtually flooded the business…

Abstract

Just‐in‐time manufacturing is one of the most important management developments of the last decade and a half. Articles on the subject have virtually flooded the business periodical literature. Yet despite the proliferation of this literature, there are indications that the fundamental implications of this concept as an effective competitive strategy have not been fully grasped by U.S. manufacturers. This article attempts to integrate the manufacturing strategy of just‐in‐time with an important element of the firm's marketing strategy—the price element of the marketing mix. Given the competitive pressures on many U.S. firms, price becomes an increasingly important competitive weapon. Only when the benefits deriving from just‐in‐time show up in a firm's marketing strategy will U.S. firms demonstrate an ability to translate an effective manufacturing strategy into a significant competitive edge.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Book part
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Robert Kozielski, Michał Dziekoński, Jacek Pogorzelski and Grzegorz Urbanek

The term ‘strategy’ is one of the most frequently used terms in business, and its application in marketing is particularly common. Company strategy, market strategy

Abstract

The term ‘strategy’ is one of the most frequently used terms in business, and its application in marketing is particularly common. Company strategy, market strategy, marketing strategy, sales strategy, promotion strategy, distribution strategy, low pricing strategy – it would take a long time to list all of them. Although this term is so commonly in use, its definition is not as straightforward and it can be interpreted in different ways. In comparison with tactical decisions, strategy is much more significant for an organisation as it brings long-lasting consequences. It is implemented by higher level managers on a regular basis, and it is based on external, often subjective information, so decisions – especially at the time they are made – are difficult to evaluate.

Taking into consideration the fact that strategy refers to a long-term rather than a short-term period, strategic decisions serve as the basis for undertaking operational activities. However, marketing refers to the market and the competition. It is possible to claim that marketing strategy is trying to find an answer to the question to which path an organisation should follow in order to achieve its goals and objectives. If, for example, a company has a goal to generate a profit of PLN 1 million by selling 100,000 pieces of a product, the market strategy should answer at least the following two questions:

  1. Who will be our target group, for example, who will purchase the 100,000 pieces of the product?

  2. Why is it us from whom a potential buyer should purchase the product?

Who will be our target group, for example, who will purchase the 100,000 pieces of the product?

Why is it us from whom a potential buyer should purchase the product?

The target market will be defined if a reply to the first question is provided. The second question identifies the foundations of competitive advantage. These two issues, that is, target market and competitive advantage are the strategic marketing issues. You cannot change your target group unexpectedly while competitive advantage is the basis for changing decisions regarding prices, promotions and sales.

This chapter describes the measures of marketing activities which refer to strategic aspects and testify a company’s market position – the measures of the performance of target groups and competitive advantage. Readers’ attention should be also focused on the indices that are less popular in Poland and, therefore, may be underestimated. It seems that some of them, for example, the index of marketing resources allocation and the marketing risk index, provide a lot of valuable information and, at the same time, make it possible to show the value of marketing investments. Their wider use in the near future is only a matter of time.

Book part
Publication date: 2 August 2016

Leslie Vincent

This chapter provides an overview of the marketing strategy development process in the commercialization of breakthrough technologies. Important concepts and elements that…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the marketing strategy development process in the commercialization of breakthrough technologies. Important concepts and elements that are considered critical when developing market applications are presented with emphasis on three key decisions: target market selection, segmentation, and positioning. These strategic decisions will guide the more tactical considerations relating to the specific elements, or marketing mix, of the product’s marketing strategy. Marketing strategy development is a dynamic process that is impacted by many factors. This chapter highlights the dynamic nature of this process as well as providing insight as to the fundamental considerations in strategy formulation.

Details

Technological Innovation: Generating Economic Results
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-238-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 26 February 2008

Leslie H. Vincent

This chapter provides an overview of the marketing strategy development process in the commercialization of breakthrough technologies. Important concepts and elements that…

Abstract

This chapter provides an overview of the marketing strategy development process in the commercialization of breakthrough technologies. Important concepts and elements that are considered critical when developing market applications are presented with emphasis on three key decisions: target market selection, segmentation, and positioning. These strategic decisions will guide the more tactical considerations relating to the specific elements, or marketing mix, of the product's marketing strategy. Marketing strategy development is a dynamic process impacted by many factors. This chapter highlights the dynamic nature of this process as well as provides insight into the fundamental considerations in strategy formulation.

Details

Technological Innovation: Generating Economic Results
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-532-1

Book part
Publication date: 3 July 2018

Rajan Varadarajan

The purposes of this chapter are to propose definitions of innovation, product innovation, business model innovation, marketing innovation, innovation strategy, and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purposes of this chapter are to propose definitions of innovation, product innovation, business model innovation, marketing innovation, innovation strategy, and strategic innovation, elaborate on their literature and conceptual underpinnings, and provide an overview of the conceptual domains of innovation, innovation strategy, and strategic innovation.

Methodology/Approach

First, certain definitions of innovation, drawn from literature, are presented. Next, certain definitions that incorporate logically incremental refinements in them are presented. Building on these, definitions of innovation, product innovation, business model innovation, and marketing innovation are proposed.

Findings

Innovation is the creation of value by using relevant knowledge and resources for conversion of an idea into a new product, process, or practice, or improvements in an existing product, process, or practice. Innovation strategy is an organization’s relative emphasis on different types of innovations and the associated pattern of resource allocation, in alignment with its strategy at the corporate and business unit levels. Strategic innovation is the creation of value by using relevant knowledge and resources for conversion of an idea into a new product, process, or practice with the potential to have a major transformational effect on the evolution of markets and industries.

Practical implications

Over the past several decades, there has been a sustained and high level of interest in issues relating to innovation among academics in a number of disciplines, business and social entrepreneurs, business practitioners, and policy makers. Books, journal articles, and business magazine articles provide a number of definitions of innovation and specific types of innovation. Multiple definitions of a construct can be problematic in certain respects and beneficial in other respects. A potential upside of multiple definitions of innovation is the prospect of each being a source of ideas for one or more innovations that benefit society, and an impetus for research focusing on specific questions.

Originality/value

Implementation of an idea, value creation, and use of relevant knowledge and resources are used as constituent elements in the proposed definitions of innovation, product innovation, business model innovation, marketing innovation, and strategic innovation.

1 – 10 of over 185000