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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2018

Tom Overmans

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the right type of organizational slack for innovation. It examines how city managers conceive slack, and how they create slack to…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to uncover the right type of organizational slack for innovation. It examines how city managers conceive slack, and how they create slack to facilitate innovation while dealing with fiscal stress.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is built around a comparative case study approach to uncover contrasts, similarities and patterns of slack-building for innovation in austere times. It relies on the experiences of 12 experienced city managers. Data are sought from elite interviews and one focus group.

Findings

The main finding is that innovation in the public sector does not benefit from slack in general, but from a specific type of slack. The evidence shows that useful slack for innovation is not so much about financial slack or HR slack, but about psychological slack.

Research limitations/implications

This study adds to the literature that the key questions of slack research should not only focus on identifying the “right amount” of slack but also on identifying of the “right type” of slack.

Practical implications

Public managers who want to deal with (fiscal) crises more innovatively might reconsider their perceptions of slack and its value. Rather than operating on a pure cost effectiveness paradigm, they should balance the costs of slack and its innovative abilities.

Originality/value

This paper highlights the social/psychological side of austerity management. It concludes that increasing the ability of public organizations to innovatively cope with fiscal stress is not so much about increasing predictive capacity or financial buffers, but about increasing the mental leeway of coworkers.

Details

Journal of Public Budgeting, Accounting & Financial Management, vol. 30 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1096-3367

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Article
Publication date: 17 August 2018

Rocio Ruiz-Benitez, Cristina López and Juan C. Real

In the present work, lean and resilient practices applied to supply chains are studied in order to evaluate their impact on the three dimensions of sustainability…

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1476

Abstract

Purpose

In the present work, lean and resilient practices applied to supply chains are studied in order to evaluate their impact on the three dimensions of sustainability. Additionally, the mutual impact of lean and resilient supply chain practices is investigated. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

The aerospace sector and its supply chain are chosen, since lean and resilient practices have been proven relevant in the sector. A methodology based on Interpretive Structural Modeling approach is applied in order to identify the existing relationships between lean and resilient supply chain practices and their impact on the three different dimensions of sustainability.

Findings

The results reveal synergetic effects between lean and resilient practices. The former practices act as drivers of the latter practices. Hence, lean practices lead to direct and indirect effects in achieving supply chain sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The relationship between lean and resilient practices has been studied for the aerospace sector. Different sectors may lead to different results as the practices considered important in each sector may differ as well as the way in which each practice is implemented.

Originality/value

This study highlights the relationship existing between lean and resilient supply chain practices and their impact on sustainability. Additionally, several managerial implications are drawn out to help managers make better decisions.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

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Article
Publication date: 19 November 2021

Klara Johanna Winkler, Elena Bennett and Hannah R. Chestnutt

For a university to be a prime mover for sustainability transformation, all units of the university should contribute. However, organizational change in educational…

Abstract

Purpose

For a university to be a prime mover for sustainability transformation, all units of the university should contribute. However, organizational change in educational institutions is often studied by examining specific domains such as research or operation in isolation. This results in a less-than-complete picture of the potential for university-wide change. In contrast, this paper aims to examine the network of social relations that determine the diffusion and sustainability of change efforts across a university. The authors use McGill University (Canada) as a model system to study the network of actors concerned with sustainability to learn how this network influences the penetration of sustainability throughout the university.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore the existing social structure, the authors use an innovative approach to illuminate the influence of social structure on organizational change efforts. Using a mixed methods approach combining social network analysis with qualitative interview data, the authors examine the influence of the social structure on sustainability transformation at McGill University. The authors conducted 52 interviews between January and April 2019 with representatives of different sustainability groups at the university across six domains (research, education, administration, operations, connectivity and students).

Findings

The authors find that McGill University has a centralized system with a low density. The network is centralized around the Office of Sustainability. The limited cross-domain interaction appears to be a result of differences in motivation and priorities. This leads to a network that has many actors but only a limited number of connections between them. The quality of the relationships is often utilitarian, with only a few relationships aiming for support and mutual growth.

Originality/value

This study brings together social network analysis, sustainability transformation and higher education in a new way. It also illustrates the complexity of guiding a large organization, such as a university, toward a sustainability transformation. Furthermore, it reveals the importance of considering each part of the university as part of an interconnected network rather than as isolated components.

Details

International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1467-6370

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Article
Publication date: 23 September 2019

Magdalena Florek, Marta Herezniak and Anna Augustyn

The purpose of the study is to verify the theoretical assumptions based on literature review regarding the issue of brand effectiveness evaluation and the potential…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of the study is to verify the theoretical assumptions based on literature review regarding the issue of brand effectiveness evaluation and the potential measurement framework, as well as to provide insights into the nature of effectiveness measurement of city brand strategies. The findings are considered important foundations for designing a place branding measurement system, which is the next step and final purpose of the author’s research project.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 12 international academic experts from eight countries (in four continents) were individually interviewed. A semi-structured individual interview was applied as a research method. Sampling was purposive and the respondents represented the fields of marketing, place branding and public management. The standardized set of 19 open-ended questions was categorized into four themes (city brand effectiveness, methodology, measurement process and indicators).

Findings

The measurement of effectiveness of city branding should be treated as a strategic endeavor; however, it is a complex issue where political, social and methodological challenges overlap. Barriers to the development of a well-functioning measurement system include: too narrow understanding of what brand is, lack of knowledge or culture of measurement, conflicting political interests, reluctance to involve internal stakeholders, insufficient funding and complexity of the brand itself. The reliable measurement system should be characterized by attributes such as simplicity and durability, stakeholder inclusion, political rationale, adjustment to the specificity of the city and the independence of the measuring body/institution.

Originality/value

Up-to-date, common standards or universal measurement frames of the place branding measurement system do not exist. No discussion can be found in the literature on how such a system should be designed and implemented. Opinions of the experts interviewed provide important insights into the components and conditions of the reliable measurement system that would meet both methodological standards and practical needs. Further studies and analyses are however necessary to eventually compose the optimal city brand measurement system.

Details

Journal of Place Management and Development, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-8335

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2013

Adi Ainurzaman Jamaludin, Noor Zalina Mahmood, Nila Keumala, Ati Rosemary Mohd Ariffin and Hazreena Hussein

The purpose of this paper is to present the efficiency of electricity use and potential of electricity reduction at 12 residential colleges located at University of Malaya…

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Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present the efficiency of electricity use and potential of electricity reduction at 12 residential colleges located at University of Malaya Campus, Kuala Lumpur.

Design/methodology/approach

The work presented applies an energy audit when energy consumption data were collected and analysed for a five‐year period. The total savings of electricity used at residential colleges were identified through the difference between average total energy use in a year (kWh) and minimum electricity usage.

Findings

The study finds that residential colleges with special features of building layout and arrangement performed better with regard to electricity consumption due to the prior group's superior utilisation of day lighting and natural ventilation. The floor area of the rooms, volume, density, enclosure and facade design, including window design, window area, and window‐to‐wall ratio also influenced the total electricity usage of the residential college buildings. Also, through adaptation of the corridor area to include more natural ventilation and daylight, approximately 40 to 90 percent of average electricity usage could be conserved in a year.

Research limitations/implications

The methodology is limited to energy audit for a five‐year period of metered data and walk‐through analysis.

Practical implications

The findings raised some issues related to thermal comfort of the residents.

Originality/value

The study can be used as baseline data for a tropical region particularly on current electricity usage and potential of energy conservation in residential building.

Details

Facilities, vol. 31 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2005

Morven G. McEachern and Claire Seaman

To identify factors that could influence consumer perceptions relating to meat production and areas where further development would be of assistance to British agriculture.

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4026

Abstract

Purpose

To identify factors that could influence consumer perceptions relating to meat production and areas where further development would be of assistance to British agriculture.

Design/methodology/approach

Qualitative semi‐structured interviews of a quota sample of Scottish meat purchasing consumers.

Findings

Results indicate that consumer views on meat production vary widely and that while there are some differences between rural and urban consumers the differences are rarely simple. Views were expressed on a variety of factors including livestock producers, agricultural production, certification and traceability. Relatively few consumers were routinely concerned with assurance labels. Consequently, knowledge of underpinning standards was limited. Primary sources of meat were the major supermarket groups with a distinct bias towards older consumers among those who preferred to shop in small butchers shops. Attitudes towards producers were mainly positive but some consumers remained sceptical about producer behaviour during hard times.

Research limitations/implications

While more research would clearly be required to consider a broader spectrum of UK consumers, these current data indicate that consumer understanding of food information and indeed their interest and credibility of the current systems is a subject that would benefit from much wider research. The practical implications for the development of Government policy and for the idividual producers are substantial and would benefit from considerable clarification.

Originality/value

Prior research concerning meat production and the views of consumers is limited. Theses findings have implications for future sector‐based communications to consumers, in that equal emphasis should be given to both rural and urban consumers. More collaborative communications measures must be implemented to ensure consumer awareness/understanding of underpinning assurance label standards and bring about loyal purchase preferences for British produce.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 107 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 18 December 2017

Finlay Green

The purpose of this paper is to provide a platform for young British Muslims in Tower Hamlets to share their perspectives on British values and identity, in light of the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a platform for young British Muslims in Tower Hamlets to share their perspectives on British values and identity, in light of the increased pressure schools are facing to actively promote “British values”.

Design/methodology/approach

Three focus groups were convened of 16-18 year olds, two all-male (one with five and one with six participants) and one all-female (five participants). Discussions were audio recorded with the data subjected to a form of thematic analysis that divided the raw data into three different categories: individual, group and group interaction data.

Findings

All but one of the participants defined themselves as British, largely due to a strong connection with British values. A minority felt this understanding was reflected back to them by society. However, the majority felt that, as ethnically Bengali and as Muslims, the opposite was the case. By judging the strength of an individual’s Britishness against the strength of their adherence to British values the government’s British values agenda is only serving to reinforce the isolation of those that feel excluded.

Originality/value

While the identities of young people, British people, and Muslims have been widely explored, there is little research that looks at the intersection of all three.

Details

Journal of Children's Services, vol. 12 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-6660

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Article
Publication date: 5 November 2021

Ardalan Marandi Alamdari, Younis Jabarzadeh, Daniel Samson and Naser Sanoubar

Green construction has begun implementing sustainable and environmentally friendly practices, but there has not yet been an assessment for green construction supply chain…

Abstract

Purpose

Green construction has begun implementing sustainable and environmentally friendly practices, but there has not yet been an assessment for green construction supply chain risks in the literature. Identification and assessment of potential risks will result in more appropriate risk mitigation strategies to overcome disruptions affecting higher performance. Thus, this study aims to identify green construction supply chain risks of residential mega-projects.

Design/methodology/approach

Interpretive structural modeling (ISM) provided a hierarchical model composed of seven layers that elucidated the driving influences between the elements. Matrice d’impacts croises-multiplication appliqúe an classement (MICMAC) analysis classified the elements into the driver, linkage and dependent variables based on their dependence and driving powers, providing a clearer understanding of risk factors and their influential characteristics. Using experts' knowledge and experience is compatible with the subjective nature of ‘supply chain risks’ and is more suitable while collecting pertinent quantitative data which is far more challenging.

Findings

Tenable output, using an international expert group, addressed key risk factors. Technical expertise and skilled labor, key customers, and corporate culture are found as elements with most driving power, and the final product and logistics coordination and supply chain configuration found as the most dependent risk factors. Managerial implications addressed the most fundamental risk sources and suggested practical proactive risk management approaches to maximize green supply chain performance.

Originality/value

Identified supply chain oriented key risk factors of the residential green mega projects add novelty to the context of green construction projects' supply chain management. And eliciting the influential relations of the key risk factors provide a bigger picture of key risks in green residential mega projects that can be extended by sub-risks related to process activities. Assessing supply chain risks' interactions in the context of green residential mega projects is a novel contribution to mega construction-project management's body of knowledge. Also, the key risk factors were categorized based on the characteristics known as driving power and dependence.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Book part
Publication date: 3 September 2021

A. Pereira, C. Frias and A. P. Jerónimo

Brand love is a notion where feelings are developed towards a specific brand. This notion is more than just a preference, it is an emotional attachment with the consumed…

Abstract

Brand love is a notion where feelings are developed towards a specific brand. This notion is more than just a preference, it is an emotional attachment with the consumed product and the brand that represents it. In tourism, destination marketing will increase the relationship between tourists and places using certain kind of messages and images whose goal is to stimulate their senses and feelings. In crisis management situations, it acts as a mediator, by assessing tourists' risk and safety perceptions, and helps mitigate lasting negative effects.

However, can destination brand love be promoted during these pandemic times? To get an in-deep understanding of the connections that exist between love and safety in tourism, this study explores two concepts through an extended literature review and a qualitative methodological approach using content analysis procedures that will focus on international marketing strategies during the ongoing pandemic crisis.

The qualitative approach was conducted through a survey composed of a set of open-ended questions (N = 31) where respondents were asked to identify their feelings after viewing the promotional tourism campaigns released after the significant increase in cases of COVID-19 worldwide.

The main results demonstrate the existence of brand love antecedents – brand trust and a sense of community, and an overall positive reaction to the images and messages promoted. Also, the existence of brand love antecedents demonstrates the brands' capacity to adapt to crisis events and its ability to outline the kind of paths that have to be defined for tourists to remain passionate about destinations.

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Article
Publication date: 9 October 2019

Jonathan Robin Crusoe and Karin Ahlin

This paper aims to develop a user process framework with activities and their variations for the use of open government data (OGD) based on empirical material and previous…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a user process framework with activities and their variations for the use of open government data (OGD) based on empirical material and previous research. OGD is interoperable data that is shared by public organisations (publishers) for anyone (users) to reuse without restrictions to create new digital products and services. The user process was roughly identified in previous research but lacks an in-depth description. This lack can hamper the ability to encourage the use and the development of related theories.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-stage research approach was used. First, a tentative framework was created from previous research and empirical material. This stage involved three different literature reviews, data mapping and seven interviews with OGD experts. The empirical material was analysed with inductive analysis, and previous research was integrated into the framework through concept mapping. Second, the tentative framework was reviewed by informed OGD experts. Third, the framework was finalised with additional literature reviews, eight interviews with OGD users, and a member check, including all the respondents. The framework was used to guide the data collection and as a tool in the analysis.

Findings

The user process framework covers activities and related variations, where the included phases are: start, identify, acquire, enrich and deploy. The start varies relating to the intended use of the OGD. In the identify phase, the user is exploring the accessible data to decide if the data are relevant. In the acquire phase, the user is preparing for the delivery of the data from the publisher and receiving it. In the enrich phase, the user is concocting and making something. In the final deploy phase, the user has a product or service that can be provided to end-users.

Research limitations/implications

The framework development has some limitations: the framework needs testing and development in different contexts and further verification. The implications are that the framework can help guide researchers towards relevant and essential data of the user process, be used as a point of comparison in analysis, and be used as a skeleton for more precious theories.

Practical implications

The framework has some practical implications for users, publishers and portals. It can introduce users to the user process and help them plan for the execution of it. The framework can help publishers understand how the users can work with their data and what can be expected of them. The framework can help portal owners to understand the portal’s role between users and publishers and what functionality and features they can provide to support to the user.

Originality/value

In previous research, no user process with an in-depth description was identified. However, several studies have given a rough recall. Thus, this research provides an in-depth description of the user process with its variations. The framework can support practice and leads to new research avenues.

Details

Transforming Government: People, Process and Policy, vol. 13 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6166

Keywords

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