Search results

1 – 10 of 85
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Elizabeth Mamali and Peter Nuttall

Focusing on a community organisation, the purpose of this paper is to unravel the process through which infringing contested practices that threaten or compromise the…

Abstract

Purpose

Focusing on a community organisation, the purpose of this paper is to unravel the process through which infringing contested practices that threaten or compromise the community’s sense of distinction are transformed into acceptable symbolic markers.

Design/methodology/approach

An ethnographic study comprising participant observation, in-depth interviews and secondary data was conducted in the context of a non-profit community cinema.

Findings

Taking a longitudinal approach and drawing from practice theory, this paper outlines how member-driven, customer-driven and necessity-imposed infringing practices settle in new contexts. Further, this paper demonstrates that such practices are filtered in terms of their ideological “fit” with the organisation and are, as a result, rejected, recontextualised or replaced with do-it-yourself alternatives. In this process, authority shifts from the contested practice to community members and eventually to the space as a whole, ensuring the singularisation of the cinema-going experience.

Practical implications

This paper addresses how the integration of hegemonic practices to an off-the-mainstream experience can provide a differentiation tool, aiding resisting organisations to compensate for their lack of resources.

Originality/value

While the appropriation practices that communities use to ensure distinction are well documented, there is little understanding of the journey that negatively contested practices undergo in their purification to more community-friendly forms. This paper theorises this journey by outlining how the objects, meanings and doings that comprise hegemonic practices are transformed by and transforming of resisting organisations.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 50 no. 9/10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 May 1988

Peter Nuttall and Martin Evans

When Theodore Levitt discussed how firms respond to the question “what business are we in?”, he highlighted the myopic perceptions of some because they viewed their…

Abstract

When Theodore Levitt discussed how firms respond to the question “what business are we in?”, he highlighted the myopic perceptions of some because they viewed their business as “running a railroad” or “making films” — rather than being “in the transport or entertainment market”.

Details

Retail and Distribution Management, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-2363

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 15 November 2011

Peter Nuttall and Julie Tinson

This paper aims to contribute to the special issue theme by exploring the perceptions of anti‐consumption and resistant practices of adolescents by their peer group in the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to contribute to the special issue theme by exploring the perceptions of anti‐consumption and resistant practices of adolescents by their peer group in the context of high school prom attendance.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper employs a mixed methods approach involving 12 in‐depth interviews with those who had attended a high school prom in the last three years and open questions on a survey to adolescents.

Findings

Four main perceptions of non‐attendance were identified: non‐choice, risk aversion, passive disengagement and intentional disengagement. Perceptions of anti‐consumption and resistance will have social implications for the non‐attendee/s but the extent to which non‐attendance is viewed negatively will also be moderated by existing social status of the non‐attendee/s.

Originality/value

Possible causes for avoiding consumption have been previously considered, however, as yet unexplored are how those who do not consume are perceived by their peers and how this manifests itself in relation to group affiliation, attendees' perception of “self” and social norms.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Sarah R. Thomas, Simon J. Pervan and Peter J. Nuttall

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of a greater marketing orientation among arts organisations and its impact on funding through sponsorship.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore the implications of a greater marketing orientation among arts organisations and its impact on funding through sponsorship.

Design/methodology/approach

Utilising a qualitative methodology, the study employs case studies for the purpose of formulating tentative and emergent knowledge.

Findings

The case study observations reveal the adoption of a marketing orientation across the sample and most significantly for the purposes of securing and consolidating sponsorship relationships. But contrary to popular academic theory this is managed without significant threat to artistic integrity or adaptation of theatrical productions.

Research limitations/implications

Data were derived from a purposive but limited sample. The advantages of a qualitative method in producing rich data is well established, however a longitudinal study would facilitate the understanding of the temporal shifts in arts sponsorships and counter the limits of the cross‐sectional nature of the study.

Practical implications

The study reveals a managerial capacity for arts organisations to attract sponsorship through customer orientation without the need to compromise its artistic and social goals.

Originality/value

A central concern to the increasing significance of business and private funding for the survival of arts organisations is the impact this has on the producers ability to remain faithful to the artistic integrity of their productions. This longstanding academic debate now has predominance in arts marketing management and the issues addressed in this paper serve to address this shift in emphasis.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Pete Nuttall

This paper seeks to understand the significance and role that music plays in adolescent socialization with a view to developing better segmentation and targeting of this…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to understand the significance and role that music plays in adolescent socialization with a view to developing better segmentation and targeting of this fickle and demanding group of consumers.

Design/methodology/approach

The study adopts a qualitative approach that attempts to get as close to the teenagers as possible – thus teenagers design and develop their own questions and interpret their own data.

Findings

This research provides an insight into the use and consumption of music at the time of the study. The data collected focus on what is important to the teenagers (typically what music “means” and the experiences it creates) and does not center on method of purchase.

Originality/value

Where previous studies have considered type (genre) of music consumed and have focused on what is important to the researcher, this study considers youth use and consumption of popular music using teenagers to interview their friends and to interpret their findings.

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 13 June 2008

Abstract

Details

Young Consumers, vol. 9 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1747-3616

Content available
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2009

Noel Dennis, Gretchen Larsen and Michael Macaulay

Abstract

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 27 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 April 1984

PETER OWEN and J.C. MASON

A linear programming method has been used to design antenna array patterns that suppress interference from certain directions. The method is particularly useful since any…

Abstract

A linear programming method has been used to design antenna array patterns that suppress interference from certain directions. The method is particularly useful since any degree of suppression can be specified. It is not necessary to impose exact nulls onto the pattern, although this can be done if desired. Moreover, by constraining real excitations to lie in the interval [‐1, 1], a pattern is obtained in which the majority of excitations remain at the quiescent value of unity. The method can be modified in principle to incorporate any other appropriate linear equality or inequality constraints on the pattern or the excitations. A detailed description of the method is given and several illustrative examples are included.

Details

COMPEL - The international journal for computation and mathematics in electrical and electronic engineering, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0332-1649

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 24 August 2004

Geoff Rose

Abstract

Details

Handbook of Transport Geography and Spatial Systems
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-615-83253-8

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1973

PHILIP B. SCHARY and BORIS W. BECKER

This monograph progresses from a consideration of definitional issues to the development of a conceptual model for marketing‐logistics interaction and finally to a…

Abstract

This monograph progresses from a consideration of definitional issues to the development of a conceptual model for marketing‐logistics interaction and finally to a discussion of the issues of implementation of the model within the context of marketing strategy. Thus, following an introduction, Part II begins with definition of the field and examines the position of physical distribution in relation to marketing. Part III discusses the relationship of physical distribution and macro‐marketing, and is thus concerned about the social, aggregative goals of logistics systems, including the costs of distribution. Part IV continues this argument, examining specifically the influence of physical distribution on channel structure. Part V then focuses on the assumptions underlying the customer service function, asking how physical distribution can influence final demand in the market place. Part VI presents a conceptual model of marketing‐logistics demand stimulation. The operational issues concerned with its implementation are shown in Part VII; and a summary of the relevant points is presented in Part VIII. The concern has been not with presenting either new computational models nor empirical data but with presenting a new perspective on the marketing‐logistics interface. There is a need to reduce the barriers between these fields and to present more useful ways for co‐operation.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution, vol. 3 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0020-7527

1 – 10 of 85