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Article
Publication date: 13 May 2020

Shih-Tse Edward Wang and Yu-Ting Liao

Although the association between social norms and alcohol dependence has been noted, how social norms cause alcohol dependence remains unclear. This study thus…

Abstract

Purpose

Although the association between social norms and alcohol dependence has been noted, how social norms cause alcohol dependence remains unclear. This study thus investigated how social norms affect the perceived benefits of drinking and alcohol identity, which in turn affect alcohol dependence.

Design/methodology/approach

Convenience sampling was used, and 452 valid questionnaires were collected from alcohol (specifically, beer) consumers over the age of 18; answers were analyzed through structural equation modeling.

Findings

Social norms positively affected the perceived benefits of drinking and alcohol identity; alcohol identity positively affected alcohol dependence; moreover, alcohol identity fully mediated the effects of social norms and the perceived benefits of drinking on alcohol dependence.

Originality/value

How social norms affect alcohol dependence has rarely been studied; thus, the present study has value for integrating the findings in the lines of research on social norms and alcohol dependence. Based on the study results, the authors recommend that policies aimed at discouraging alcohol dependence should focus on mitigating the social pressure to drink and the perceived benefits of drinking as well as labeling others as drinkers.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 122 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

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Article
Publication date: 7 November 2016

Shih-Wei Chou and I.H. Hung

The purpose of this paper is to solve the challenges in knowledge outcome (e.g. knowledge contribution, knowledge exploration) improvement at the post-adoption phase in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to solve the challenges in knowledge outcome (e.g. knowledge contribution, knowledge exploration) improvement at the post-adoption phase in the context of e-communities. This study develops a model by integrating dedication-constraint framework and self-presentation theory. The model proposes that knowledge outcomes at the post-adoption phase rely on relationship development between community members, conceptualized as commitment. The authors also hypothesize that members’ perceived online self-presentation quality, theorized as personal control and social influence, serves as the key means to motivate members’ commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

This study used survey instrument to collect data and adopted partial least squares to test the proposed hypotheses.

Findings

The results show that perceived online self-presentation quality positively affects relationship development, which in turn affects continuance intention for knowledge outcomes.

Research limitations/implications

This study expands the dedication-constraint framework by integrating the self-presentation theory. This study contributes new knowledge by proposing a model that delineates the relationship between online self-presentation quality, relationship development, and knowledge outcomes at the post-adoption stage.

Practical implications

This study shows that members’ perceived online self-presentation quality affects both affective commitment and calculative commitment, which in turn affect knowledge outcomes, suggesting the important role of the perceived quality in stimulating a member’s post-adoption reactions.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the research on post-adoption behavior in an e-community context by accounting for the influence of e-community features in self-presentation quality and dedication-constraint mechanisms on post-adoption phenomena.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

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Article
Publication date: 29 February 2008

Kamel Rouibah

The purpose of this paper is to study factors that affect adults' acceptance of instant messaging (IM) for social and entertainment purposes in an Arab country

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study factors that affect adults' acceptance of instant messaging (IM) for social and entertainment purposes in an Arab country

Design/methodology/approach

An expanded version of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) was used to test the impact of four factors (subjective norms, perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and perceived enjoyment) and a new construct, curiosity about other people, on the level of IM usage by 191 adults in Kuwait. Survey questions from prior studies were adopted and customized, and the model analyzing using Structural Equation Model with LISREL.

Findings

IM usage is a different type of technology usage than work‐related forms of ICT since it is employed for social and recreational usage. Unlike prior studies that employed TAM in a work‐related setting, perceived usefulness was not a significant antecedent of usage; however, perceived enjoyment, social norms, curiosity about other people, and perceived ease of use were all important antecedents of IM usage.

Research limitations/implications

This study focused on IM usage outside the workplace for social purposes and was restricted to adults within one country (Kuwait). Additional studies across Arab countries are encouraged as well as comparatives studies about IM usage for different contexts (work‐related use of IM from home and IM usage in the workplace).

Practical implications

This study is useful for researchers willing to highlight the factors that motivate users' ICT adoption outside the workplace and for social purposes. It also has implications for managers and software vendors seeking to enhance the adoption of communication‐oriented forms of ICT in the Arab world

Originality/value

The study highlights motives of ICT usage among Arab adults, which has not been widely studied. It also describes Arab culture and shows how certain aspects of culture affect ICT usage.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. 21 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 October 2020

Robin B. DiPietro, Kimberly Harris and Dan Jin

The purpose of this study was to investigate restaurant employee behaviors and their likelihood of intervening when witnessing food safety threats.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to investigate restaurant employee behaviors and their likelihood of intervening when witnessing food safety threats.

Design/methodology/approach

A mixed method was used for this study with the focus group interview and survey questionnaire. A total of eight focus groups ranging in number of participants from to 6 to 12 were asked to respond to presented scenarios that depicted restaurant employees committing food safety risk behaviors and threats in the restaurant environment that would present food safety risks such as out-of-stock bathroom supplies, dirty tables in the restaurant dining area, employee personal hygiene issues and unclean production equipment. These participants were also asked to complete a draft of the survey that would later be edited and distributed to the sample population.

Findings

Results suggest that social norms and perceived severity of threats impact the likelihood that restaurant employees will intervene. Implications for academics and practitioners are discussed.

Originality/value

This study was special as it provides a synthetic viewpoint that considers how service organizations can work to do a better job of interviewing employees before starting their jobs about their beliefs and personal practices of food safety at home, their previous work in the restaurant industry and food safety culture that they may have worked in before, as well as increasing the communication in restaurants to build a food safety culture. These practices can help to lower risks to the public regarding food safety and can help to build relationship trust in the brands that we all love to indulge in when dining out.

Details

International Hospitality Review, vol. 34 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-8142

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Book part
Publication date: 18 November 2014

Alexis Downs and Beth Stetson

This chapter applies an “integrative” model to examine the impact and interaction of economic and moral/social factors in the corporate tax compliance context. More…

Abstract

Purpose

This chapter applies an “integrative” model to examine the impact and interaction of economic and moral/social factors in the corporate tax compliance context. More specifically, it examines whether social norms moderate the effect of economic factors in this context.

Design/methodology

Fifty-five MBA students assumed corporate CFO roles and analyzed a proposed aggressive corporate tax shelter transaction (“tax shelter”). Participants indicated whether they would recommend the tax shelter and answered questions regarding the transaction and their corporate tax compliance views.

Findings

Hierarchical Regression results indicate that, in the corporate tax compliance context, decision makers’ norms (moral/social factors) moderate the effect of perceived expected value of aggressive tax transactions (economic factors). More specifically, results indicate that (1) perceived legality of aggressive corporate tax transactions significantly impacts willingness of corporate decision makers to recommend them, even when controlling for perceived economic effect of the transaction, and (2) due to moral/social factors, corporate decision makers often may not support aggressive tax treatments with material positive expected values.

Practical implications

Accordingly, (1) custom and social factors should be integrated into the corporate tax compliance decision-making framework, and (2) campaigns to strengthen corporate tax compliance should focus on the law’s text and intent as well as upon sanctions for noncompliance.

Details

Advances in Taxation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-120-6

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Article
Publication date: 4 February 2014

Heeyoung Jang and Ilsang Ko

The objective of this study is to identify the factors that affect CoP activation and performance variables obtainable through CoP activities, and to gain greater insight

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this study is to identify the factors that affect CoP activation and performance variables obtainable through CoP activities, and to gain greater insight into their relationships and the mechanisms. In particular, this paper intends to illustrate the role of perceived risk factor for the loss of uniqueness of one's own knowledge in terms of their influence on CoP activities.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, the human behaviours were divided into online and offline CoP activities and adopted affirmative affect and social norm from the Triandis model. In addition, the paper considered perceived expectation, perceived risk, and organization support as independent variables. These would accelerate online and offline activities in the community of practice. The paper considered relationship commitment and individual performance in the context of performance evaluations via CoP activities. A structural equation model was developed with research variables and hypotheses.

Findings

As the consequence of the empirical assessment of the variables influencing the on/offline activities of a CoP, social norm, perceived expectation, perceived risk, and organizational support showed significantly influential relationships with online activities, and affirmative affect, perceived expectation, and organizational support evidenced significantly influential relationships with offline activities. However, with regard to online CoP activities, affirmative affect was not shown to be significant. As to offline activities, perceived risk was not shown to be significantly influential, while it was determined to significantly influence online activities in a negative direction.

Originality/value

The results of this study demonstrated that on/offline CoP activities were significantly influential in terms both of relationship commitment and individual performance.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 18 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2018

Muhammad Sabbir Rahman, Mahafuz Mannan and Mohammad Mahboob Rahman

From the perspective of developing countries, studies regarding the behavioral effects of quitting tobacco consumption on emerging psychological determinants are limited…

Abstract

Purpose

From the perspective of developing countries, studies regarding the behavioral effects of quitting tobacco consumption on emerging psychological determinants are limited. The purpose of this paper is to examine the influence of emotional intelligence (EI), social norms, susceptibility and self-efficacy on the behavioral effects of quitting tobacco consumption among young smokers in developing countries.

Design/methodology/approach

By reviewing existing literature, this study developed a conceptual model to test the influences of significant psychological determinants in regards to a young smoker’s intention to quit smoking. Accordingly, a survey instrument was designed to collect data from young smokers in Bangladesh using the convenience sampling method. A total of 500 self-administered questionnaires were distributed, out of which only 400 questionnaires were used in final data analysis. This study applied partial least square structural equation modeling (PLS-SEM) to test the proposed model.

Findings

Perceived EI, perceived social norms and perceived susceptibility were found to have significant direct positive effects on intention to quit smoking. Perceived susceptibility and perceived self-efficacy were observed to have moderating effects on intention to quit smoking through perceived EI and perceived social norms respectively. However, perceived self-efficacy was not found to have any significant direct effect on intention to quit smoking.

Originality/value

This is the first study of its kind which combined EI, susceptibility, self-efficacy, and social norms in one theoretical framework to explain a young smoker’s intention to quit smoking. Also, in the context of Bangladesh and similar developing countries, there are no such studies which used the psychological components investigated in this study to predict a young smoker’s intention to quit smoking. Thus, the findings bring us closer to the goal of a tobacco-free society by allowing policy makers, NGOs, broader communities, and ultimately individual citizens to understand the psychological predictors of quitting tobacco consumption among young smokers in developing countries.

Details

Health Education, vol. 118 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

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Article
Publication date: 24 August 2017

Christine Louise Hackman, Tricia Witte and Marissa Greenband

Sexual violence (SV) is a pervasive public health issue on college campuses. While much research has been conducted to determine factors contributing to SV, little work…

Abstract

Purpose

Sexual violence (SV) is a pervasive public health issue on college campuses. While much research has been conducted to determine factors contributing to SV, little work focuses on the role of perceived social norms. The purpose of this paper is to examine college students’ perceived descriptive norms for SV perpetration (i.e. prevalence estimates for SV).

Design/methodology/approach

Using a cross-sectional survey, male and female college students from a large public institution in the Southeastern USA were instructed to estimate the prevalence of SV for “typical students” of their same gender on campus.

Findings

When compared to actual prevalence rates of SV perpetrated by females and males, both perpetrators and non-perpetrators overestimated the prevalence of SV among same-sex peers, but perpetrators made even higher estimates compared to those made by non-perpetrators for some sexually aggressive acts. Results demonstrate strong and consistent normative misperceptions surrounding SV perpetration.

Research limitations/implications

Findings lend support for testing social norms-based prevention programs for SV on college campuses.

Originality/value

This study is one of the first investigations into perceived social norms surrounding SV; perceived social norms may be an influential factor contributing to SV.

Details

Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1759-6599

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Article
Publication date: 2 January 2020

Kuan-Yu Lin, Yi-Ting Wang and Travis K. Huang

The number of smartphone users has increased with the maturity of mobile networks, which has not only led to a new lifestyle but has also facilitated the development of…

Abstract

Purpose

The number of smartphone users has increased with the maturity of mobile networks, which has not only led to a new lifestyle but has also facilitated the development of mobile application services. Smartphones are regarded as essential communication devices. Currently, diverse groups of people are considering using mobile payment services. Thus, the motives for using mobile payment as well as individual motives for continuing usage are of great research interest. The purpose of this paper is to examine the behavioral motivations underlying individual intentions to continue using mobile payment.

Design/methodology/approach

To explore the factors affecting the intention to use mobile payment services, this study constructed a theoretical framework based on cost-benefit theory that also considers social influences to form an integrated research model that explains the intentions of individuals to use mobile payment services. Online questionnaires were used to evaluate individuals with experience using mobile payment services. A total of 302 questionnaires were collected. Structural equation modeling was employed to assess the relationships among factors included in the research model.

Findings

Perceived value, social norms and social self-image played crucial roles in the intention to use mobile payment services. Furthermore, perceived benefits (relative advantage and service compatibility) and perceived costs (security risks and perceived fees) determined users’ perceived value. Social self-image positively affected users’ perceived value; in the context of a mobile-oriented information system, the ability of a mobile payment service to satisfy a user’s demands with respect to social self-image influenced the user’s perceived value of using such services.

Originality/value

This study contributes to a theoretical understanding of factors that explain users’ intention to use mobile payment services.

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 44 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

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Article
Publication date: 3 May 2019

Akilimali Ndatabaye Ephrem, Rebecca Namatovu and Edith Mwebaza Basalirwa

Entrepreneurship is important for economic growth, through its role in the provision of employment. In the recent past, a number of African universities have developed…

Abstract

Purpose

Entrepreneurship is important for economic growth, through its role in the provision of employment. In the recent past, a number of African universities have developed entrepreneurship education courses to facilitate the growing demand for entrepreneurs in the market. An immediate outcome anticipated from entrepreneurship education is to increase entrepreneurial intention (EI) among the participants. Unfortunately, most of the entrepreneurship education in developing economies has not been linked to an increase in the EI of students. This paper thus proposes that it is when students possess high levels of psychological capital and perceive positive social norms that entrepreneurship education will lead to positive EI. The purpose of this paper is to establish the relationship between perceived social norms (PSN), psychological capital and EI of university students.

Design/methodology/approach

Quantitative data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire on a random sample of 196 final year entrepreneurship and business management students, from three universities in Bukavu (East of DRC). Structural equation modeling was used to test the research hypotheses.

Findings

The paper provides four main findings. First, PSN and psychological capital have a positive significant effect on EI. Second, PSN contribute more to this effect than psychological capital. Third, PSN make a positive and significant effect on psychological capital. Lastly, psychological capital positively mediates the relationship between PSN and EI.

Research limitations/implications

This study could have benefited from a qualitative approach to have a more in-depth explanation of these relationships. The study is conducted amongst students who operate in a controlled environment. This may not reflect the actual behavior of entrepreneurs.

Practical implications

This work provides cues of what entrepreneurship educators should consider as they recruit and train students. Specifically, the study highlights the importance of students’ psychological capital and positive social norms in transforming entrepreneurial education into intention.

Originality/value

This study adds value to knowledge by highlighting the mediating role of psychological capital on the relationship between PSN and EI.

Details

Education + Training, vol. 61 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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