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Article
Publication date: 28 January 2014

Per Anker Jensen, Per Dannemand Andersen and Birgitte Rasmussen

The purpose of this paper is to identify trends and challenges in relation to the FM profession in the Nordic countries of Europe and to identify inputs to a common Nordic…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify trends and challenges in relation to the FM profession in the Nordic countries of Europe and to identify inputs to a common Nordic research agenda.

Design/methodology/approach

The study is based on theory from innovation systems and strategic foresight. First, a review of literature was carried out and an innovation systems model of the FM sector was developed. Second, four national workshops were held involving FM practitioners and researchers from Denmark, Norway, Sweden and Finland. Third, the results of the workshops were presented and discussed at a Nordic FM conference in August 2011. Finally, an adapted Delphi survey was carried out as a final data collection and validation of the findings. This article has the main focus on the results of the Delphi survey.

Findings

The results of the study show that the main issues vary considerably between the four countries, both with regards to megatrends in the strategic environments, the current trends and challenges and the future needs for new competences and knowledge. Despite the large national differences the study is able to identify joint interest across the four countries. Based on the study a common Nordic research agenda is proposed with two headlines: Valuation and professionalization of FM, and Resources and sustainability.

Research limitations/implications

The study provides directions for future research with particular focus on the Nordic countries in Europe.

Practical implications

The study identifies trends and challenges as well as need for new knowledge and competences for FM practice in each of the four Nordic countries.

Originality/value

This is the first comprehensive foresight study aimed at developing a research agenda for FM across the Nordic countries.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2005

Per Dannemand Andersen, Birgitte Rasmussen, Marianne Strange and Jens Haisler

The purpose is to report on a Danish nano‐science and nano‐technology foresight project carried out in 2004.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose is to report on a Danish nano‐science and nano‐technology foresight project carried out in 2004.

Design/methodology/approach

The foresight process had the following key elements: review of international technology foresight projects on nano‐technology; mapping of Danish nano‐science and nano‐technology; broad internet survey among interested parties; expert reports; workshops related to the expert reports; analysis of the dynamics of innovation within nano‐technology; survey on hazards and environmental and ethical aspects; group interviews with members of the public.

Findings

The article reflects on the following methodological issues: domain classification and its influence on conclusions; the use of statements or hypotheses; trustworthiness of the foresight process and its recommendations.

Practical implications

Recommendations from the project have already been used in decision‐making on R&D funding and in strategic deliberation in publicly funded institutions conducting R&D. Others are expected to be used for decision‐making, and some are being discussed in research councils and ministries or are being investigated and developed further. Moreover, the foresight process has created broader awareness of, and debate especially about, the hazardous aspects of nano‐technology among researchers and decision makers.

Originality/value

The article contribute the to the European experiences with national level foresight exercises. The case and the findings are of value for science and innovation policy makers, foresight practitioners and scolars within the field.

Details

Foresight, vol. 7 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Kalle Artturi Piirainen, Allan Dahl Andersen and Per Dannemand Andersen

This paper aims to argue that innovation system foresight (ISF) can significantly contribute to the third mission of universities by creating an active dialogue between…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to argue that innovation system foresight (ISF) can significantly contribute to the third mission of universities by creating an active dialogue between universities, industry and society.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper’s approach is conceptual. The authors analyse the third mission and relevant literature on innovation systems and foresight to explain how and why foresight contributes to the third mission.

Findings

The authors propose that foresight contributes to the third mission of universities, particularly to the research and development and innovation dimensions through the development of joint understanding of the agendas and future needs of stakeholders. In addition, foresight enables education to be designed to address identified needs.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are both conceptual and exploratory in nature. Thus, the argument needs further examination through a broader study on foresight in the university–industry context and/or longitudinal research on the outcomes and impact of foresight in this context.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the importance of understanding the systemic nature of innovation and its role in economic development. Universities must understand their role within the larger innovation system to fulfil the potential of economic development and by extension, their third mission.

Originality/value

The paper outlines a novel approach of using ISF to promote university–industry partnerships and the growth of innovation systems. The paper also contributes to the discussion of the third mission by outlining that mission in practical terms.

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Article
Publication date: 23 October 2007

Birgitte Rasmussen, Per Dannemand Andersen and Allan Skårup Kristensen

The purpose of this paper is to report on experiences and reflect on challenges in transdisciplinary technology foresight as exemplified by cognition and robotics research.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to report on experiences and reflect on challenges in transdisciplinary technology foresight as exemplified by cognition and robotics research.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted as a broad transdisciplinary process involving users and producers of robot technology solutions as well as scientists and other experts in cognition and robotics. Transdisciplinarity is understood as the transcendence of disciplinary modes together with the involvement and participation of non‐scientists in problem formulation and knowledge provision. The study focuses on the possibilities for innovation at the crossroads where robotics and cognition meet.

Findings

The paper reflects on the following methodological issues: medium‐ and long‐term research and innovation possibilities and barriers in a transdisciplinary context; the classification and framing of transdisciplinary fields; the facilitation of technology foresight processes; and the trustworthiness of the foresight process and its recommendations.

Practical implications

The results have been disseminated among relevant advisory and grant‐awarding bodies within research and innovation, relevant knowledge institutions and universities, and companies on both the development and user sides of the technologies.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to European experiences on national‐level foresight exercises. The conceptual findings of the case study are of value to science and innovation policy makers, foresight practitioners and scholars within the field.

Details

Foresight, vol. 9 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-6689

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 30 September 2014

Per Anker Jensen, Theo J.M. van der Voordt, Christian Coenen and Anna-Liisa Sarasoja

This paper aims to summarize recent research findings and reflections on The Added Value of Facilities Management (FM) and to outline perspectives for future research and…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to summarize recent research findings and reflections on The Added Value of Facilities Management (FM) and to outline perspectives for future research and development of the added value of FM.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is based on reflections on contributions to the recently published book “The Added Value of Facilities Management” and related future studies, as well as further exploration of five main themes.

Findings

Added value is expected to be central in the future development of FM, which is confirmed by recent foresight studies. There is a need for a better understanding of alignment between FM and core business, performance measurement methods and how models such as the FM Value Map can be of value to the involved stakeholders. Corporate social responsibility (CSR), sustainability and branding have great potential to add value and to elevate FM to become a strategic partner with corporate top management. Management of stakeholders’ perception of value and relationships are essential aspects as well and need further attention.

Research limitations/implications

The article is based on the conclusions of several studies that aimed to explore items for further research, on the ideas of all co-authors of “The Added Value of Facilities Management” anthology and on further exploration of five main themes, and not on an extensive review of recommendations for further research to be found in a huge number of research reports.

Practical implications

The findings and ideas for further research on the added value of FM deliver input to further professionalization of FM.

Originality/value

This paper provides important input to the future research agenda on the added value of FM and sheds new light on five particular research topics.

Details

Facilities, vol. 32 no. 13/14
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-2772

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Dave Collins

This paper aims to identify the state of the art in Green Leases and Green Leasing in theory and practice, while also identifying how the roles and motivations of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to identify the state of the art in Green Leases and Green Leasing in theory and practice, while also identifying how the roles and motivations of the stakeholders of “owner/landlord”, “lessee” and “facilities management” are different in a building that uses Green Leasing and Green Leases, as opposed to the one without.

Design/methodology/approach

Through existing literature and existing case studies from 1995 to the present day, this paper will identify the state of the art of Green Leases and Green Leasing and the extent to which literature-based discussions have played out in their practical application in the real estate sector. The roles of key stakeholders will be analysed and then compared to the interactions and roles identified in a theoretical model that describes the same stakeholders but from a more traditional stakeholder perspective. This will be achieved through using literature from journal papers mostly from the disciplines of built environment, facilities management, finance, investment, law, management and real estate.

Findings

The literature and case studies found in literature demonstrate a gradual move towards advancing Green Lease adoption and development. While the roles of key stakeholders do see a change in Green Leased buildings in terms of, for example, changing competencies for facilities managers (FMs) and more user engagement with their buildings sustainability, the literature indicated most of the changes are realised through a strengthening of existing interactions already evident in buildings without a Green Lease or Green Leasing.

Originality/value

This paper provides a state of the art review on the development of Green Leasing and Green Leases in theory and practice from a stakeholder perspective. It provides possibility to expand further on the changing roles of these stakeholders in Green buildings, which in turn could also positively affect the further development of Green Leases themselves, as well as sustainable certification methodologies such as Europe’s leading certification “Building Research Establishment Environmental Assessment Method” (BREEAM).

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