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Article
Publication date: 13 March 2007

Paula A. McLean and D.G. Brian Jones

Mead was one of the first university professors of Finance in North America. The purpose of this article ia to document his career at the Wharton School of Business at the…

Abstract

Purpose

Mead was one of the first university professors of Finance in North America. The purpose of this article ia to document his career at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania from 1900 to 1944.

Design/methodology/approach

This research used traditional historical interpretation of rare archival documents, drew from the autobiography of Mead's more famous daughter, Margaret Mead, and includes an analysis of Mead's published work in Finance.

Findings

The findings are reported as an intellectual biography. The paper reports on Mead's life and career as a pioneer Finance scholar.

Originality/value

There has been almost nothing published about the history of the Finance discipline and nothing published about the contributions of Edward Sherwood Mead.

Details

European Business Review, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0955-534X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 20 March 2009

Paula A. McLean

The purpose of this paper is to provide an historical review of Stanley C. Hollander's History of Labels.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an historical review of Stanley C. Hollander's History of Labels.

Design/methodology/approach

Historical review essays summarize and evaluate older, historically significant books by situating them in historical perspective often using biographical details of the subject.

Findings

In History of Labels, Hollander shows us early in his career that he is a rigorous marketing historian, and a brilliant and entertaining writer. Anyone doing research in marketing history should include this book on their reading list.

Originality/value

In the context of this special issue celebrating Hollander's life and work, the subject of this review essay is one of his earliest historical works and has never been reviewed in this fashion.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 April 2010

D.G. Brian Jones, Peggy Cunningham, Paula McLean and Stanley Shapiro

The purpose of this paper is to present a biographical sketch of David D. Monieson whose academic career in marketing included time spent at the Wharton School of Business at the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to present a biographical sketch of David D. Monieson whose academic career in marketing included time spent at the Wharton School of Business at the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Toronto, and over 30 years at Queen's University. It is focussed on Monieson's contributions to the history and philosophy of marketing thought, especially with respect to what Monieson called “usable knowledge” in marketing.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses a traditional historical narrative based on extensive personal interviews with Monieson and with some of his students and colleagues as well as archival research including personal correspondence, course notes, research notes, and other unpublished documents.

Findings

Monieson made important contributions to the thinking about history and philosophy of marketing thought. Some of his ideas, such as the intellectualization and re‐enchantment of marketing, have found a following among marketing academics; others, such as complexity, have not.

Originality/value

There is no published biographical study of Monieson and no detailed analysis of his contributions to marketing thought. This biographical sketch provides insights into several significant marketing ideas and tells the life story of an important marketing scholar.

Details

Journal of Historical Research in Marketing, vol. 2 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-750X

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 7 June 2023

Alicia Martín-Navarro, María Paula Lechuga Sancho and Jose Aurelio Medina-Garrido

Companies are increasingly implementing business process management systems (BPMSs) to support their processes. However, there is a gap in the literature regarding whether users…

1537

Abstract

Purpose

Companies are increasingly implementing business process management systems (BPMSs) to support their processes. However, there is a gap in the literature regarding whether users also use BPMSs to manage the knowledge needed for processes to be completed. This study aims to analyze the factors that cause users to use BPMSs to manage the knowledge required in business processes.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper proposes an original model that integrates two successful information system models applied to BPMSs and knowledge management systems. To test the hypotheses derived from this new model, data were collected from 242 mature BPMS users from 12 Spanish and Latin American companies. Structural equation modeling with AMOS was used to examine the model.

Findings

Users’ perceived usefulness of a BPMS when using it for knowledge management (KM) is the only factor influencing them to use it for KM.

Practical implications

This study has practical implications for managers wishing to successfully implement a BPMS to support processes and for employees to use the knowledge embedded in the tool. The latter will only happen if users perceive the tool’s usefulness for KM.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this model is the first empirically validated model to successfully analyze BPMS users’ tendency to use BPMSs as a tool to support necessary KM in processes.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 27 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 28 May 2019

Thomas Schmidt, Timo Braun and Jörg Sydow

Organizational routines emerge in firms during the process of new venture creation. Typically, they are imprinted and sometimes replicated by the entrepreneurs creating the…

Abstract

Organizational routines emerge in firms during the process of new venture creation. Typically, they are imprinted and sometimes replicated by the entrepreneurs creating the organization, reflecting individual and contextual characteristics. In particular cases, organizations are designed for replicating routines for new ventures. The authors investigate one such case from the IT industry using a dynamic routine perspective and focus on how routines originally created by an organization are replicated in several new ventures. In more detail, the authors focus on how routine replication counter-intuitively allows for innovating in new venture creation. The authors find that routine replication supports entrepreneurial innovation in three ways: (1) the replicator organization’s accelerating routines unburden the replicator organization’s innovating routines; (2) the replicator organization’s accelerating routines unburden the new venture’s innovating routines; and (3) the new venture’s accelerating routines unburden the new venture’s innovating routines. The authors contribute to the discussion about the replication dilemma by conceptualizing “unburdening” as a mechanism that allows both routinization and innovation benefits to be reaped.

Details

Routine Dynamics in Action: Replication and Transformation
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-585-2

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 October 2022

Jeya Amantha Kumar, Paula Alexandra Silva, Sharifah Osman and Brandford Bervell

Selfie is a popular self-expression platform to visually communicate and represent individual thoughts, beliefs, and creativity. However, not much has been investigated about…

Abstract

Purpose

Selfie is a popular self-expression platform to visually communicate and represent individual thoughts, beliefs, and creativity. However, not much has been investigated about selifie's pedagogical impact when used as an educational tool. Therefore, the authors seek to explore students' perceptions, emotions, and behaviour of using selfies for a classroom activity.

Design/methodology/approach

A triangulated qualitative approach using thematic, sentiment, and selfie visual analysis was used to investigate selfie perception, behaviour and creativity on 203 undergraduates. Sentiment analyses (SAs) were conducted using Azure Machine Learning and International Business Machines (IBM) Tone Analyzer (TA) to validate the thematic analysis outcomes, whilst the visual analysis reflected cues of behaviour and creativity portrayed.

Findings

Respondents indicated positive experiences and reflected selfies as an engaging, effortless, and practical activity that improves classroom dynamics. Emotions such as joy with analytical and confident tones were observed in their responses, further validating these outcomes. Subsequently, the visual cue analysis indicated overall positive emotions reflecting openness towards the experience, yet also reflected gender-based clique tendency with modest use of popular selfie gestures such as the “peace sign” and “chin shelf”. Furthermore, respondents also preferred to mainly manipulate text colours, frames, and colour blocks as a form of creative output.

Originality/value

The study's findings contribute to the limited studies of using selfies for teaching and learning by offering insights using thematic analysis, SA and visual cue analysis to reflect perception, emotions, and behaviour.

Peer review

The peer review history for this article is available at: https://publons.com/publon/10.1108/OIR-11-2021-0608/

Details

Online Information Review, vol. 47 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1468-4527

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 February 1984

I.R. McLEAN

This paper describes the evolution of educational administration training for secondary school principals and teachers in New Zealand's Central Region, following a national…

Abstract

This paper describes the evolution of educational administration training for secondary school principals and teachers in New Zealand's Central Region, following a national pattern of short withdrawal courses to train trainers who would themselves be expected to train others. Problems associated with this approach are examined, especially massive client resistance to theoretical approaches. The value of theory in such courses is seen in its encouragement of role conceptualization, and acceptable teaching material is designed to achieve this end without theoretical exposition, through the development of techniques seen as answers to specific school‐based problems, but implying the development of skills and concepts on a broader base. The management of time is seen as the critical entry point. In this way resource groups of teachers are trained to continue the autonomous development of administrative training in their own in‐service areas.

Details

Journal of Educational Administration, vol. 22 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-8234

Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Paula Robinson, Emma Griffith and Chris Gillmore

Studies show that experiences of repeated or complex trauma are very common in patients with severe mental health problems. Unfortunately, many professionals do not routinely ask…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies show that experiences of repeated or complex trauma are very common in patients with severe mental health problems. Unfortunately, many professionals do not routinely ask about abuse, due to concerns about how to ask and respond. There is also a need for frontline staff to be trained in trauma-informed care. The purpose of this paper is to identify the needs of inpatient staff and developed a tailor-made training package.

Design/methodology/approach

A training programme was developed from focus-group discussion and delivered to the team. Questionnaires were administered pre-, post-training and at three-month follow-up, to assess changes in knowledge, confidence and worries in the assessment and treatment of complex trauma.

Findings

There was an increase in self-reported staff confidence (p=0.001) and knowledge (p=0.028) about working with complex trauma and their worries decreased (p=0.026) between pre- and post-training.

Practical implications

In order to sustain the benefits of training for longer, recommendations were made to the service for on-going training, supervision and evaluation.

Originality/value

Given the recent interest in complex trauma within the literature (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fifth Version (DSM-V); International Statistical Classification of Diseases – 11th Version (ICD-11)), the piloting and development of complex trauma training packages is timely. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first published account of complex trauma training for inpatient staff. This paper offers clinical and research implications to services who may want to develop as trauma-informed services within the NHS.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 October 2018

Gustavo Santos, Célia Soares, Raquel Rebelo and Paula Ferreira

While awaiting resolution of their legal process, undocumented migrants (UM) face several challenges, including limited access to public health care. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

While awaiting resolution of their legal process, undocumented migrants (UM) face several challenges, including limited access to public health care. The purpose of this paper is to survey UM attending a detention centre in Oporto (Portugal) to estimate the prevalence of mental health disorders in this population.

Design/methodology/approach

A retrospective chart review was performed with the relevant sociodemographic and clinical data of all UM in the process of coercive removal from Portuguese territory, observed by Doctors of the World, during three years (2014–2016). The Tenth Version of International Classification of Mental and Behavioural Disorders was used for nosological classification.

Findings

In total, 393 detainees were eligible for the study. Most detainees were male (84 per cent) and 76 months was the mean length of stay in Portugal before detention. In total, 29 per cent of detainees were diagnosed with a mental and behavioural disorder. The most prevalent diagnosis was neurotic, stress-related and somatoform disorders (47 per cent). UM with dual diagnosis (28 per cent) led to the articulation with the integrated centres of drug addiction, which provided and monitored opioid substitution therapy. Female UM were more prone to develop any mental and behavioural disorder when compared to men (χ2=7,017; p<0.05).

Research limitations/implications

In total, 9 per cent of the detainees were excluded from this study due to incomplete data on their medical charts. Some detainees presented oppositional behaviour, hostility towards others and refused to be assessed by the medical team. Both situations could have biased the prevalence of mental disorders. Finally, the appropriateness of the western model of mental health disorders (ICD-10) in the study population is controversial, considering the culture-bound phenomenology and syndromes.

Originality/value

This paper identified the most prevalent mental health disorders in UM detained in Portugal. The most prevalent mental health disorders were either stress-related (associated with the detention itself) or related to previous patterns of substance abuse. Given the study outcomes, it is highly recommended to mobilise human and technical resources to provide specialized mental health care to UM at least while detention policies could not be changed.

Details

Journal of Public Mental Health, vol. 17 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5729

Keywords

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