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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2009

Peter Woodward and Sarah Halls

The general knowledge and skills of staff working with people with learning disabilities have been of interest for a number of years, and Valuing People (DH, 2001…

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Abstract

The general knowledge and skills of staff working with people with learning disabilities have been of interest for a number of years, and Valuing People (DH, 2001) highlighted them as a significant issue. Research has shown that there are further deficits in the knowledge and skills of staff concerning the mental health of people with learning disabilities. This paper gives a general overview of some of the factors involved in the training and knowledge of learning disabilities staff relating to mental health. Early indications from research have shown that training may be effective as a way of addressing these problems, but further research and clear guidance on best practice in implementing staff training are needed in this important area.

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Advances in Mental Health and Learning Disabilities, vol. 3 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1753-0180

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 1990

Valerie Thompson

With the aim of discovering the importantfactors in training staff to use newly installedautomated circulation systems, libraries inNew Zealand with such systems were sent…

Abstract

With the aim of discovering the important factors in training staff to use newly installed automated circulation systems, libraries in New Zealand with such systems were sent a questionnaire in 1988. This asked questions about how libraries had trained staff to use the system, and the outcome of this training in terms of satisfaction with their decisions regarding training, and of sparseness of mistakes made by staff after implementation of the system. Three facets of the administration of training were vitally important: (1) The vendor of the system must be heavily involved in the training; (2) As many staff as possible must be given a detailed training in the whole system; (3) As much of the training as possible must be given before system implementation.

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Library Management, vol. 11 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 2014

Katja Koski, Kaisa Martikainen, Katja Burakoff, Hannu Vesala and Kaisa Launonen

This paper aims to evaluate the role of the supervisor's support on the effectiveness of a communication training program targeted at staff members who work with…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to evaluate the role of the supervisor's support on the effectiveness of a communication training program targeted at staff members who work with individuals who have profound and multiple learning disabilities.

Design/methodology/approach

The aim was to explore which aspects of supervisory support influenced the staff members to participate in the programme and the results for the on-going effects of the training.

Findings

Staff members reported a need for more supervisory support to maintain the results of the training and to disseminate the new practices to non-trained staff.

Originality/value

Although supervisory support seems to benefit staff members during their participation in training programmes, even careful planning and execution of this support cannot ensure its continuation after the training is finished.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 19 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1989

Gretchen Freeman and Russell Clement

The successful implementation of an automated library system depends on many factors. While systems and libraries vary greatly, an area that can never be overlooked is…

Abstract

The successful implementation of an automated library system depends on many factors. While systems and libraries vary greatly, an area that can never be overlooked is staff training. By its very nature automation training differs from other types of in‐house library instruction. This article identifies seven critical issues in implementing and maintaining a staff training program. Issues discussed include timing, modularity location, documentation, follow‐up and continuity.

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The Electronic Library, vol. 7 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1993

Naomi Stanford

Considers the challenges and opportunities faced by the trainers ofsupport staff in a major accounting and management consultancy practice,where, in common with other…

Abstract

Considers the challenges and opportunities faced by the trainers of support staff in a major accounting and management consultancy practice, where, in common with other professional services organizations, support staff have traditionally been considered of lower value to the organization than those qualified to offer its services. Describes the Practice Support Training function which aims to be flexible accessible and responsive to business needs and develops the firm′s support staff through a sixfold approach – line people deliver the training; programmes are short, modular, and delivered through a range of methods; training focuses on developing staff to do their current job excellently; emphasis is placed on continuous development; informal development opportunities are being extended; the same opportunities exist to staff in offices throughout the UK.

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Industrial and Commercial Training, vol. 25 no. 10
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0019-7858

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2016

Ciara Padden

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Stocks and Slater’s paper, “Training in positive behavioural support: increasing staff self-efficacy and positive…

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573

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide a commentary on Stocks and Slater’s paper, “Training in positive behavioural support: increasing staff self-efficacy and positive outcome expectations”.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a narrative review of staff training in positive behaviour support (PBS) and challenging behaviour, drawing on Stocks and Slater’s paper and the core staff competencies outlined in the PBS Competence Framework (PBS Coalition, 2015).

Findings

Taking into consideration multiple outcome measures, including staff outcomes such as self-efficacy, changes in staff behaviour, and the impact on quality of life for service users, may provide a broader insight into the effects of staff training. Supports and systems such as hands-on training, supervision, and practice leadership are also important factors that are likely to lead to positive service user and staff outcomes.

Originality/value

This commentary reflects on Stocks and Slater’s paper in the broader context of staff training outcomes and factors that contribute to high-quality services for people with learning disabilities and challenging behaviour.

Details

Tizard Learning Disability Review, vol. 21 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-5474

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Article
Publication date: 11 December 2006

Charlie Brooker and Coral Sirdifield

Approximately 90% of prisoners experience mental health problems, substance misuse problems or both. However, prison reception screening tools are not always effective in…

Abstract

Approximately 90% of prisoners experience mental health problems, substance misuse problems or both. However, prison reception screening tools are not always effective in enabling staff to identify mentally disordered prisoners. Therefore, to ensure that these individuals get access to appropriate care, custodial staff should be trained in recognising the signs and symptoms of mental health disorders, and in effectively working with these individuals. This paper charts the pilot implementation of a mental health awareness workbook designed for use in custodial settings across England. It examines the variety of approaches adopted to implement the workbook, staff views on the usefulness of the workbook, and barriers to implementation encountered in each area. Recommendations made for best practice in delivering the workbook in other areas suggest a need for changes to its format, but also that time should be ring‐fenced for staff to participate in this training, in groups led by experts such as in‐reach team members.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 1 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Article
Publication date: 7 June 2019

Paula Robinson, Emma Griffith and Chris Gillmore

Studies show that experiences of repeated or complex trauma are very common in patients with severe mental health problems. Unfortunately, many professionals do not…

Abstract

Purpose

Studies show that experiences of repeated or complex trauma are very common in patients with severe mental health problems. Unfortunately, many professionals do not routinely ask about abuse, due to concerns about how to ask and respond. There is also a need for frontline staff to be trained in trauma-informed care. The purpose of this paper is to identify the needs of inpatient staff and developed a tailor-made training package.

Design/methodology/approach

A training programme was developed from focus-group discussion and delivered to the team. Questionnaires were administered pre-, post-training and at three-month follow-up, to assess changes in knowledge, confidence and worries in the assessment and treatment of complex trauma.

Findings

There was an increase in self-reported staff confidence (p=0.001) and knowledge (p=0.028) about working with complex trauma and their worries decreased (p=0.026) between pre- and post-training.

Practical implications

In order to sustain the benefits of training for longer, recommendations were made to the service for on-going training, supervision and evaluation.

Originality/value

Given the recent interest in complex trauma within the literature (Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders – Fifth Version (DSM-V); International Statistical Classification of Diseases – 11th Version (ICD-11)), the piloting and development of complex trauma training packages is timely. To the author’s knowledge, this is the first published account of complex trauma training for inpatient staff. This paper offers clinical and research implications to services who may want to develop as trauma-informed services within the NHS.

Details

Mental Health Review Journal, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-9322

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1987

David Baker

Library assistants were originally considered to be professional librarians in the making, and were trained accordingly. With the expansion of libraries and librarianship…

Abstract

Library assistants were originally considered to be professional librarians in the making, and were trained accordingly. With the expansion of libraries and librarianship, Britain's “apprenticeship” system of qualification gave way to formal library school education, and a new category of “non‐professional staff” was created, of people who were unwilling or unable to proceed to graduate‐level qualification. The development of non‐professional certificates of competence in the UK is described against parallel developments in the US, Canada and Australia; the COMLA training modules are also examined. The theoretical and practical issues surrounding training are discussed, training schemes and qualifications in the four countries analysed, and the relative merits of in‐house training and external certificate programmes argued.

Details

Library Management, vol. 8 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Sandie King, David McMenemy and Alan Poulter

The aim of this paper is to report the findings of a survey into staff perceptions of the UK‐wide information and communications technology (ICT) training conducted under…

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Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to report the findings of a survey into staff perceptions of the UK‐wide information and communications technology (ICT) training conducted under the People's Network programme for public library staff.

Design/methodology/approach

A web‐based survey was undertaken across several prominent UK mailing lists, seeking staff views on issues such as the usefulness of the training provided, and any perceived gaps in training that existed. The survey also asked what types of ICT queries staff regularly encountered.

Findings

It was found that while the staff found the training rewarding, there were concerns at the lack of ICT troubleshooting in the programme, and the reliance on an off‐the‐shelf training programme not specifically designed for libraries, namely the European Computer Driving License, or ECDL. The paper suggests that ICT training for library staff should be built around problem solving and troubleshooting, rather than generic skills, in order to match the kinds of queries encountered in the front line of libraries.

Originality/value

The paper is useful for anyone involved in designing library training programmes, or for researchers or students interested in the ICT skills necessary for librarians and the types of ICT queries encountered in the workplace.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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