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1 – 10 of 31
Article
Publication date: 20 November 2009

Paul Illingworth

Discrimination takes the form of continuing segregation and exclusion in society. Prison staffs are actively encouraged to be anti‐discriminatory. Offenders are one group…

Abstract

Discrimination takes the form of continuing segregation and exclusion in society. Prison staffs are actively encouraged to be anti‐discriminatory. Offenders are one group discriminated against by society; estimates have been as high as 90% of offenders also having mental health problems. People with mental illness are also discriminated against, therefore offenders with mental illness are at greater risk of being discriminated against. This article explores how quality assurance models could be used as a means of improving anti‐discriminatory practice in prison settings.

Details

Ethnicity and Inequalities in Health and Social Care, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-0980

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Arlene Greer

Astronomy has experienced a rapid rate of discovery and change in the recent past, particularly because of the space program and general technological development. Through…

Abstract

Astronomy has experienced a rapid rate of discovery and change in the recent past, particularly because of the space program and general technological development. Through information gathered from artificial satellites, radio astronomy, orbiting observatories, and space probes, astronomy has advanced rapidly since the 1950s. This progress has also affected standard reference sources in the field.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 11 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

Article
Publication date: 29 June 2021

Bidhan Mukherjee and Bibhas Chandra

In response to scholarly calls, the study aims to extend and magnify the existing understanding by unravelling the differential impact of anticipated emotions on green practice…

Abstract

Purpose

In response to scholarly calls, the study aims to extend and magnify the existing understanding by unravelling the differential impact of anticipated emotions on green practice adoption intention through a proposed model by integrating anticipated pride and guilt in the same continuum along with values (altruistic, biospheric and egoistic) on an employee's attitude.

Design/methodology/approach

A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data randomly from 307 employees and middle-level executives of three subsidiaries of CIL through the simple random sampling (SRS) technique. Data were analysed using structural equation modelling (SEM).

Findings

Results demonstrate that anticipated guilt influences individual cognitions and future ecological decision-making through improved attitude and higher concern for the environment while pride influences only through improved attitude. Other than biospheric and altruistic values, anticipated guilt is a direct and important antecedent of concern. Altruistic values are more influential predictors of environmental intentions in comparison to biospheric values. At the same time, environmental concern is more robust in predicting eco-intentions than attitude.

Originality/value

It makes notable difference from other studies by not only exploring the validity of the relationship between values on attitude and environmental concern but has also considered anticipated emotions of pride and guilt together alongside values on the same continuum as an antecedent of environmental attitude and concern towards employees’ green behavioural intention at the workplace. The findings are believed to provide a common consensus on differential effects of different states of emotions on environmental concern and attitude.

Details

Kybernetes, vol. 51 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 10 December 2018

Johan Gaddefors and Alistair Anderson

The objective of this longitudinal ethnography of a rural small town in Northern Sweden, following the presence and identifying the processes associated with an incoming…

Abstract

The objective of this longitudinal ethnography of a rural small town in Northern Sweden, following the presence and identifying the processes associated with an incoming entrepreneur, was to better understand entrepreneurship in a rural context. The significant shaping of entrepreneurship by context is increasingly recognised, with entrepreneurship in depleted communities being an important part of this research movement. This chapter is positioned at the conjunction of these literatures. The authors have studied this community for 10 years; regularly interviewing the entrepreneur and residents; attending meetings and making observations. The authors found that the entrepreneurial creation of garden provoked a raft of change, such that entrepreneurship reverberated throughout the town. To explain these effects, the authors developed the concept of entrepreneurial energy. Entrepreneurial energy is a vitality produced in and by entrepreneurship. It works, in part, as a role model, holding up examples of what can be done. But much more, the presence of entrepreneurial energy serves to invigorate others. It becomes amplified in new ways of doing, new ways of being, yet calcified in the entrepreneurial actions of others. The authors saw how it unleashed the latent, promoted the possible, to entrepreneurially revive the town.

Details

Creating Entrepreneurial Space: Talking Through Multi-Voices, Reflections on Emerging Debates
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-372-8

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1996

DAVID G. PROVERBS, PAUL O. OLOMOLAIYE and FRANK C. HARRIS

The results of a model based survey of contractors' planning engineers in France and the UK suggest that planned completion times for constructing an identical high‐rise in situ…

Abstract

The results of a model based survey of contractors' planning engineers in France and the UK suggest that planned completion times for constructing an identical high‐rise in situ concrete framed structure are significantly and dramatically lower in France than in the UK. Average planned construction periods in France were 13 weeks, some 9 weeks faster than the UK average of 22 weeks. Since planned construction periods reflect past experience, French contractors apparently achieve superior levels of production performance whilst at the same time working fewer hours per week, utilizing directly employed workers and employing fewer supervisors. If such planned completion times are truly representative, the findings indicate comparatively poor UK contractor performance, and signify future problems for the British builder in the emerging European marketplace. The causes of such poor performance are complicated, but based on indicative French best practices: production is enhanced when scheduled overtime is avoided, a directly employed and mainly skilled workforce is engaged, and a maximum working time of 40 hours per week is the norm rather than the exception.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1994

Bill Richardson, Anthea Gregory and Sara Turton

This paper seeks to address the important modern management issue of vision management. In particular, it attempts to provide examples of, and to differentiate between three…

Abstract

This paper seeks to address the important modern management issue of vision management. In particular, it attempts to provide examples of, and to differentiate between three different types of visionary who have been the focal points for the theorists working in this area. It presents a profile of the ‘ideal visionary’ as portrayed by theory and provides a checklist of generic visionary qualities to help those readers who need to assess a would‐be visionary, and predict the likelihood of his/her achieving success at the top of an organisation. Finally, the paper notes that the strengths of the visionary are often the sources of his/her eventual failure. These strengths‐come‐weaknesses have been identified along with more externally generated organisational performance reducers.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Article
Publication date: 12 October 2015

Paul Goldsmith, Jackie Moon, Paul Anderson, Steve Kirkup, Susan Williams and Margaret Gray

Error reporting by healthcare staff, patient-derived complaints and patient-derived medico-legal claims are three separate processes present in most healthcare systems. It is…

402

Abstract

Purpose

Error reporting by healthcare staff, patient-derived complaints and patient-derived medico-legal claims are three separate processes present in most healthcare systems. It is generally assumed that all relate to the same cases. Given the high costs associated with these processes and strong desire to maximise quality and standards, the purpose of this paper is to see whether it was indeed the case that most complaints and claims related to medical errors and the relative resource allocation to each group.

Design/methodology/approach

Electronic databases for clinical error recording, patient complaints and medico-legal claims in a large NHS healthcare provider organisation were reviewed and case overlap analysed.

Findings

Most complaints and medico-legal claims do not associate with a prior clinical error. Disproportionate resource is required for a small number of complaints and the medico-legal claims process. Most complaints and claims are not upheld.

Research limitations/implications

The authors have only looked at data from one healthcare provider and for one period. It would be useful to analyse other healthcare organisations over a longer time period. The authors were unable to access data on secondary staffing costs, which would have been informative. As the medico-legal process can go on for many years, the authors do not know the ultimate outcomes for all cases. The authors also do not know how many medico-legal cases were settled out of court pragmatically to minimise costs.

Practical implications

Staff error reporting systems and patient advisory services seem to be efficient and working well. However, the broader complaints and claims process is costing considerable time and money, yet may not be useful in driving up standards. System changes to maximise helpful complaints and claims, from a quality and standards perspective, and minimise unhelpful ones are recommended.

Originality/value

This study provides important data on the lack of overlap between errors, complaints and claims cases.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 28 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Peter Williams, David Nicholas and Paul Huntington

Examines the way the general public exploits the Internet for health information, the motives behind usage, attitudes towards issues such as quality concerns, and the extent to…

2019

Abstract

Examines the way the general public exploits the Internet for health information, the motives behind usage, attitudes towards issues such as quality concerns, and the extent to which Internet interventions affect the doctor‐patient relationship. Although a questionnaire survey was used (posted on the NHS Direct Web site), the questions asked were open, and invited free‐text “qualitative” answers. This method was a success in terms of the amount and richness of the data accrued. Results suggested that the Internet is exploited in a wide variety of ways, by users acting in a number of roles – patient, intermediary or professional. Some health professionals are now so comfortable with the Internet that they encourage Internet usage by their patients. Lay users demonstrated a high level of understanding of issues raised, and showed a (healthy?) scepticism regarding the information provided. Many users felt that their consultations with doctors had been enriched by Internet‐acquired information.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 55 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 5 June 2018

Stacy M. Kelly

This chapter discusses the elements of interventions provided to students who are visually impaired within the context of past instructional advancements still in effect today and…

Abstract

This chapter discusses the elements of interventions provided to students who are visually impaired within the context of past instructional advancements still in effect today and current instructional advancements preparing the field for tomorrow. Disability-specific interventions and the theoretical framework that encompasses the unique areas of instruction for students with visual impairments are described. Important additional considerations of interventions for students with visual impairments are presented. Needs of students who are visually impaired, alignment with state standards, management of limited instructional time, and shortage of qualified specialists who teach students with visual impairments are examples of significant matters to be considered for effective instructional practice in present-day classrooms.

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Gordon Wills

Describes the efforts of the owner/directors of a private limitedcompany to put into place a succession strategy. Considers three majorthemes: second generation…

Abstract

Describes the efforts of the owner/directors of a private limited company to put into place a succession strategy. Considers three major themes: second generation entrepreneurs/management succession; action learning as a human resource development strategy and philosophy; and the learning organization. Concludes that people (and organizations) “learn” best from the priorities of the business, once they have been identified, and that organizational learning is really based on institutionalization of what has been learned – requisite learning.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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