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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Anne-Sophie Thelisson and Olivier Meier

The objective of the study is to explore legitimation dynamics in a public–private integration process and to gain insights on the specific role of CSR in triggering…

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of the study is to explore legitimation dynamics in a public–private integration process and to gain insights on the specific role of CSR in triggering public–private logics.

Design/methodology/approach

Corporate social responsibility (CSR) is part of firms' strategy in gaining legitimacy from their stakeholders in a merger context. However, little is known about the role of CSR in triggering diverse dynamics from public or private logics during post-merger integration. This study aims at exploring the specific role of CSR in triggering such diverse logics. A qualitative research design based on a single case study of a public–private merger of two French listed companies in the urban planning sector was opted for. The analysis was pursued in real time from the signing of the agreement and then over two years.

Findings

The results show that public–private legitimation is a process that proceeds in stages. The authors emphasize the key factors that characterize it: align on external concerns: reflecting societal and institutional pressures (public legitimation); readapt to make sense internally in relation to the merger through managerial innovation (private legitimation) and CSR as a form of corporate self-storying: combining the social and societal aspects of CSR within the organization (hybrid legitimation). Three major actions were identified in activating a CSR legitimation strategy: identifying and responding to local needs; building a unified brand, culture, and employee commitment to the organization; and creating sustainable programs.

Research limitations/implications

The first major contribution is linked to triggers influencing legitimation dynamics and in particular the role of CSR operating as a legitimation strategy in the merger integration process. A second theoretical contribution is linked to the evolutionary nature of the post-merger integration process. The processual study shows how stakeholder legitimacy demands can escalate and change over time.

Practical implications

First, three major actions were identified as key steps in activating a CSR legitimation strategy (identifying and responding to local needs; building a unified brand, culture, and employee commitment to the organization; and creating sustainable programs). These missions can be understood as key steps for managers in implementing CSR within an organization in a post-merger integration context. Second, this study increases our comprehension of legitimation as a dynamic micro-process. The different stages described in the study can be considered by the managers involved in the merger process as learning experiences to understand the complex phenomenon that is the integration process.

Originality/value

This study enriches the legitimacy-as-process perspective in providing insights on the specific role of CSR in triggering public–private logics.

Details

Management Decision, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 15 November 2021

Emily Joan Darlington, Gemma Pearce, Teresa Vilaça, Julien Masson, Sandie Bernard, Zélia Anastácio, Paul Magee, Frants Christensen, Henriette Hansen and Graça S. Carvalho

The aim was to identify the competencies professionals need to promote co-creation engagement within communities.

Abstract

Purpose

The aim was to identify the competencies professionals need to promote co-creation engagement within communities.

Design/methodology/approach

Co-creation could contribute to building community capacity to promote health. Professional development is key to support co-creative practices. Participants were professionals in a position to promote co-creation processes in health-promoting welfare settings across Denmark, Portugal, France and United Kingdom. An overarching unstructured topic guide was used within interviews, focus groups, questionnaires and creative activities.

Findings

The need to develop competencies to promote co-creation was high across all countries. Creating a common understanding of co-creation and the processes involved to increase inclusivity, engagement and shared understanding was also necessary. Competencies included: How to run co-creation from the beginning of the process right through to evaluation, using feedback and communication throughout using an open action-oriented approach; initiating a perspective change and committing to the transformation of co-creation into a real-life process.

Practical implications

Overall, learning about underlying principles, process initiation, implementation and facilitation of co-creation were areas identified to be included within a co-creation training programme. This can be applied through the framework of enabling change, advocating for co-creative processes, mediating through partnership, communication, leadership, assessment, planning, implementation, evaluation and research, ethical values and knowledge of co-creative processes.

Originality/value

This study provides novel findings on the competencies needed for health promoting professionals to embed co-creative processes within their practice, and the key concerns that professionals with a position to mediate co-creation have in transferring the abstract term of co-creation into a real-world practice.

Details

Health Education, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-4283

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Deniz Çolakkadıoğlu

In Turkey, where the environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been applied since 1993, there have been numerous amendments in the legal and administrative process of the…

Abstract

Purpose

In Turkey, where the environmental impact assessment (EIA) has been applied since 1993, there have been numerous amendments in the legal and administrative process of the EIA. This study aims to evaluate the effectiveness of those amendments to the EIA process.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper evaluated EIA system performance in the context of procedural effectiveness in Turkey from the day implementation was begun. From its beginning to the present day, the positive and negative developments at the EIA process in Turkey caused by the amendments were evaluated and at which stages. Measures recommended increasing the effectiveness of each of the EIA systems were also identified.

Findings

As the EIA Directive first came into force in the USA in 1970, EIA procedures have been widely adopted throughout the world. Although it has been implemented for many years, expectations regarding the EIA process have still not been realized which has forced countries to conduct studies to increase the effectiveness of the EIA process. Turkey, like other countries that are implementing the EIA, acknowledges that the EIA is a significant impact assessment tool and continues its studies to implement this system effectively. In this respect, in Turkey, where the EIA has been applied since 1993, there have been numerous amendments in the legal and administrative process of the EIA.

Originality/value

The results obtained from this study were expected to facilitate the evaluation of the EIA process in Turkey and to guide other similar countries.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 13 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Hanqing Gong, Lingling Shi, Xiang Zhai, Yimin Du and Zhijing Zhang

The purpose of this study is to achieve accurate matching of new process cases to historical process cases and then complete the reuse of process knowledge and assembly experience.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to achieve accurate matching of new process cases to historical process cases and then complete the reuse of process knowledge and assembly experience.

Design/methodology/approach

By integrating case-based reasoning (CBR) and ontology technology, a multilevel assembly ontology is proposed. Under the general framework, the knowledge of the assembly domain is described hierarchically and associatively. On this basis, an assembly process case matching method is developed.

Findings

By fully considering the influence of ontology individual, case structure, assembly scenario and introducing the correction factor, the similarity between non-correlated parts is significantly reduced. Compared with the Triple Matching-Distance Model, the degree of distinction and accuracy of parts matching are effectively improved. Finally, the usefulness of the proposed method is also proved by the matching of four practical assembly cases of precision components.

Originality/value

The process knowledge in historical assembly cases is expressed in a specific ontology framework, which makes up for the defects of the traditional CBR model. The proposed matching method takes into account all aspects of ontology construction and can be used well in cross-ontology similarity calculations.

Details

Assembly Automation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-5154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Rodrigo Luiz Morais-da-Silva, Andréa Paula Segatto, Gelciomar Simão Justen, Indira Gandhi Bezerra-de-Sousa and Eduardo De-Carli

Social innovation has been attracting attention in the literature and the practice field due to its intention to create social value. However, the social innovation process

Abstract

Purpose

Social innovation has been attracting attention in the literature and the practice field due to its intention to create social value. However, the social innovation process is still poorly studied and is marked by several disagreements in the existing models, often built from data coming from developed countries. So, the focus of this study is to answer the following research question: how is the social innovation process configured in a developing context?

Design/methodology/approach

The study investigated three cases of Brazilian social innovation processes through a qualitative approach. The authors also use the institutional levels perspectives to analyse the cases.

Findings

The main findings indicate that the social innovation process comprises five phases and occurs between the micro, meso and macro institutional levels. Besides, the social innovation process relies on the participation of different partners, in a non-sequential process, with the possibility of returning from one stage to another and is evaluated continuously over time.

Practical implications

This study may be useful for social entrepreneurs and their teams in organisations that generate social innovations (such as social enterprises) to understand how well-established initiatives have organised themselves over time. Public policymakers may also use the insights provided to create more favourable environments to create new social innovation initiatives and expand the existing ones.

Originality/value

The characteristics of the social innovation process revealed in this study contributes to the advancement of the area, mainly because it considers the perspective of institutional levels and is based on data from a developing country.

Details

Business Process Management Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-7154

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Monika Duchna, Monika Duchna, Iwona Cieślik, Alexander Kloshek, Bogusława Adamczyk-Cieślak, Magdalena Zieniuk, Dorota Moszczyńska and Jarosław Mizera

The purpose of this paper is to obtain high-temperature-resistant material with high density and to conduct microstructural investigations of 3D-printed Ni-based alloy…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to obtain high-temperature-resistant material with high density and to conduct microstructural investigations of 3D-printed Ni-based alloy 713C specimens.

Design/methodology/approach

High-density specimens of Ni-based alloy 713C were obtained by the optimizing selective laser melting (SLM) process parameters and an X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis confirmed the occurrence of γ and γ′ phases and the presence of carbides in the SLM-manufactured Ni-based alloy 713C. The analysis of electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) studies suggested a preferred 〈100〉 direction orientation and low angle misorientation for the SLM specimens.

Findings

The high-density specimens of Ni-based alloy 713C were obtained by the optimized SLM process parameters. XRD analysis confirmed the presence of γ and γ′ phases and carbides in the SLM-manufactured Ni-based alloy 713C. Analysis of EBSD studies suggested a preferred 〈100〉 direction orientation and low angle misorientation for the SLM specimen.

Originality/value

In this study, 3D-printed Ni-based alloy 713C with a high density of 99% was obtained for the first time, to the best of the authors’ knowledge.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Pavel Castka, Xiaoli Zhao, Phil Bremer, Lincoln C. Wood and Miranda Mirosa

Audits are an essential part of supply chain management, whether they be of a single supplier's facilities or the whole supply chain. Before the COVID-19 pandemic…

Abstract

Purpose

Audits are an essential part of supply chain management, whether they be of a single supplier's facilities or the whole supply chain. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, auditors mainly conducted supplier audits in-person and on-site. Subsequent travel restrictions have meant that auditors have had to perform these audits remotely. The purpose of this paper is to conceptually describe the emerging phenomenon of remote audits and explore the implications of this change for the future.

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory research used qualitative interviews with key stakeholders (firms, auditors and regulators) to provide an empirical basis for the study. A total of 60 interviews were conducted in two rounds with 40 respondents from 26 organizations. A process perspective lens was used to explore the fundamental changes in supplier audits.

Findings

The study provides an interpretative conceptual framework of remote supplier audits grounded in key factors (audit process, use of technologies, document and record sharing) and identifies a set of contingency factors (technological sophistication, reputation for integrity, maturity of internal audit processes, and level of complexities and risk involved) that affect the effectiveness of remote audits.

Originality/value

Remote supplier audits have radically changed how supply chains operate. This paper presents the first empirically-grounded study on remote auditing. It provides a springboard for future research in this domain and practical implications for managers to assist them with the development of remote auditing in their firms and supply chains.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 18 November 2021

Yingjie Zhang, Wentao Yan, Geok Soon Hong, Jerry Fuh Hsi Fuh, Di Wang, Xin Lin and Dongsen Ye

This study aims to develop a data fusion method for powder-bed fusion (PBF) process monitoring based on process image information. The data fusion method can help improve…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to develop a data fusion method for powder-bed fusion (PBF) process monitoring based on process image information. The data fusion method can help improve process condition identification performance, which can provide guidance for further PBF process monitoring and control system development.

Design/methodology/approach

Design of reliable process monitoring systems is an essential approach to solve PBF built quality. A data fusion framework based on support vector machine (SVM), convolutional neural network (CNN) and Dempster-Shafer (D-S) evidence theory are proposed in the study. The process images which include the information of melt pool, plume and spatters were acquired by a high-speed camera. The features were extracted based on an appropriate image processing method. The three feature vectors corresponding to the three objects, respectively, were used as the inputs of SVM classifiers for process condition identification. Moreover, raw images were also used as the input of a CNN classifier for process condition identification. Then, the information fusion of the three SVM classifiers and the CNN classifier by an improved D-S evidence theory was studied.

Findings

The results demonstrate that the sensitivity of information sources is different for different condition identification. The feature fusion based on D-S evidence theory can improve the classification performance, with feature fusion and classifier fusion, the accuracy of condition identification is improved more than 20%.

Originality/value

An improved D-S evidence theory is proposed for PBF process data fusion monitoring, which is promising for the development of reliable PBF process monitoring systems.

Details

Rapid Prototyping Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2546

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Louisi Francis Moura, Edson Pinheiro de Lima, Fernando Deschamps, Dror Etzion and Sergio E. Gouvea da Costa

This conceptual paper presents a proposal for improving a performance measurement (PM) system implementation process based on enterprise engineering (EE) guidelines, which…

Abstract

Purpose

This conceptual paper presents a proposal for improving a performance measurement (PM) system implementation process based on enterprise engineering (EE) guidelines, which gives the process a sense of completeness.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper analyzes a well-known process for PM systems implementation organized in two phases: identifying, designing and implementing the top-level performance measures; and cascading the top-level measures and identify appropriate lower-level performance measures. The proposed improvements to the studied process derive from the EE guidelines, which establish a basis for the structure of an organizational management system, the formalization and synchronization of processes, performance expectations, exception handling and change management.

Findings

The study reveals that not all EE guidelines are covered by the analyzed process, with four of them having no evidence of being adopted: involvement of people in process design and implementation; ensuring interoperability between different systems in the information structure; addressing of all possible exceptions; coherence and consistency of semantics across all processes.

Originality/value

By the lens of EE guidelines, this paper advances a how-to-guide. This paper can support managers and researchers on PM system design and implementation, given the importance and relevance of EE recommendations having a consistent and well-structured procedure.

Details

International Journal of Productivity and Performance Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-0401

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 17 November 2021

Thanh Thi Cao, Phong Ba Le and Nhan Thi Minh Nguyen

Given the important role of knowledge sharing (KS) processes for organizational innovation, the purpose of this study is to investigate the mediating roles of tacit and…

Abstract

Purpose

Given the important role of knowledge sharing (KS) processes for organizational innovation, the purpose of this study is to investigate the mediating roles of tacit and explicit KS in bridging the relationship between high-involvement human resource management (HRM) practices and specific aspects of innovation capability, namely, product and process innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Analysis of moment structures and structural equation modeling are applied to examine the correlation among the constructs based on the survey data collected from 111 manufacturing and service firms.

Findings

The empirical findings reveal that KS processes positively mediate the relationship between high-involvement HRM practices and innovation capability. It highlights the important role of explicit KS in fostering aspects of innovation capability compared to the effects of tacit KS on aspect of innovation capability.

Practical implications

Vietnamese firms should pay much attention to high-involvement HRM practices to improve their innovation capabilities. In addition, fostering the willingness of employees for sharing tacit knowledge (e.g. experiences, uncommon understandings and insights) and explicit knowledge (e.g. formal information, official documents and reports and procedures and policies) is one of the most optimal solutions for firms to pursuit product and process innovation capability.

Originality/value

This paper significantly contributes to increasing knowledge and insights on the correlation between high-involvement HRM practices and specific forms of innovation. The understanding on mediating role of KS processes contributes to advancing the body of knowledge of HRM practices and innovation theory.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

Keywords

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