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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1994

JANE FARMER and JENNIFER VAN HENGEL

Under the Patient's Charter, The National Health Service has an obligation to become more responsive to the needs of patients. These needs have been shown by research to…

Abstract

Under the Patient's Charter, The National Health Service has an obligation to become more responsive to the needs of patients. These needs have been shown by research to include the provision of good quality information, both oral and written, about patients' drugs. The provision of such information has been shown to increase compliance, patient satisfaction and confidence of patients in coping with their illness, drugs and any side‐effects. The information in this article was gathered as a preliminary to further research. It combines a review of the literature with information from a series of informal interviews with members of the local healthcare team. The article looks at where patients get drug information from, then moves on to examine the value of providing such information. Issues arising in the provision of drug information are considered and recommendations are provided which indicate long term concerns and approaches for further work.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 50 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2006

Ramanan Rajasundaram, Steve Phillips and Nigel R. Clay

To assess patients' attitude towards information leaflets, their understanding of the given information, and the time factor involved in an out‐patient clinic set‐up.

1248

Abstract

Purpose

To assess patients' attitude towards information leaflets, their understanding of the given information, and the time factor involved in an out‐patient clinic set‐up.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 50 patients who received depot preparation of Methyl Prednisolone as local injections in an out‐patient hand‐clinic were given 15 minutes to read the patient information leaflet and were simultaneously asked to answer a questionnaire.

Findings

Patients want to be informed and are willing to spend more time and effort on information leaflets. Their ability to grasp and retain the relevant information is highly variable. Excess of information, poor presentation/format, lack of time, irrelevant data are factors which seem to adversely affect the effectiveness of information leaflets.

Originality/value

This study gives recommendations to those providing patient care. Emphasises the need for a careful review of all written information with respect to patients' better understanding of the treatment they will receive for the condition being treated.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 19 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 January 1992

Sally Munro

Total quality management (TQM) is one of many new quality initiatives being introduced in the NHS to improve the quality of information and overall service quality. Out…

Abstract

Total quality management (TQM) is one of many new quality initiatives being introduced in the NHS to improve the quality of information and overall service quality. Out‐patient departments were targeted by the Department of Health as an area in which to start quality improvements, particularly regarding the provision of information to patients. Describes a study undertaken in a rheumatology out‐patients clinic which examined the flow of information, where information can be improved and how TQM can help improvement. Based on the hypothesis that patients′ and staff′s perceptions of information quality differ to the extent that some patients are not satisfied with information quality and this is inconsistent with a TQM approach. The quality of information was measured in three areas: sufficiency, understanding, and selectivity. A structured questionnaire was used and 80 patients and 11 staff were interviewed. Discusses differences in perceptions of information. Further research is needed to make a detailed study of information flow and to identify specific areas of information provision for improvement.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 1997

Vikki A. Entwistle, Ian S. Watt and Amanda J. Sowden

The idea that patients should be informed about the benefits and risks of treatment options and involved in decisions about their care is, to many people, appealing and…

Abstract

The idea that patients should be informed about the benefits and risks of treatment options and involved in decisions about their care is, to many people, appealing and sensible. However, it has important implications. This paper briefly considers two motivations for involving patients in clinical decisions and explores some of the issues raised by these. It then makes some practical suggestions for those wanting to provide information to support patient involvement. The paper emphasizes that although the provision of more good‐quality information to patients is widely accepted to be a priority, it is not always a straightforward matter and warrants critical consideration. Substantial resources may be needed if it is to be done well.

Details

Journal of Clinical Effectiveness, vol. 2 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1361-5874

Article
Publication date: 1 December 2003

Gavin McWhirter

This article is a summary of a report which looks at the potential of using television sets at hospital bedsides to provide patients with access to health information. The…

606

Abstract

This article is a summary of a report which looks at the potential of using television sets at hospital bedsides to provide patients with access to health information. The report was jointly commissioned by The Department of Health (DoH) and National Health Service (NHS) Direct Online, and focused on what could be done using existing (or planned) Patient Power infrastructure. The latest generation of systems from all three of the main suppliers of bedside television service could provide access to health information in a variety of ways. A group meeting was held with key internal DoH and NHS stakeholders. Interviews were held with the main suppliers of bedside television services. Opinions were also taken from several academics specialising in Health Informatics, from a range of commercial health information providers and a wide range of NHS Trust representatives. Two areas where further research would be of use are looking at the opportunities around digital radio as a way of providing patients with health information, and looking at any particular issues that exist around communication with patients while they are in hospital.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 55 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 4 August 2022

Korina Katsaliaki

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the views of doctors, nursing staff and hospitalized patients on the level of information they provide and receive…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate and compare the views of doctors, nursing staff and hospitalized patients on the level of information they provide and receive respectively in public hospitals, focusing on the factors that affect their communication.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a cross-sectional survey with a sample of 426 participants from two general hospitals in Greece–Pella and KAT Attica. Data were collected through a questionnaire in March–May 2020 and was analyzed with mean comparisons and correlations.

Findings

The results showed discrepancy in the satisfaction rate, with 67.3% satisfied patients from doctors' communication vs. 83.7% satisfied doctors. Improvements in hospital staff – patient communication are required especially on alternative therapies' discussion and time spent on communication. All respondents agreed that staff shortage is a deterrent factor for effective communication. Seamless for all respondents' groups, the factors that affect the communication satisfaction level are the duration of communication, time allowed for expressing questions and interest in patients' personal situation.

Practical implications

Strengthening the communication skills of medical staff and providing clear guidelines on when and how to inform patients are essential.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the growing body of research on doctor–patient communication. Its originality lies on the fact that communication satisfaction level was examined simultaneously for doctors, nurses and patients. The study provides additional evidence supporting the link among satisfaction and duration of communication and personalized relationship. The study's findings are important in the training of medical staff and the management of patients' expectations.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 35 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 September 2003

Pankaj Sharma, Anand Arya and Samrendu Singh

A prospective audit of 76 patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery was performed. The aim of this audit was to assess how effectively patients are consented at a…

755

Abstract

A prospective audit of 76 patients undergoing elective orthopaedic surgery was performed. The aim of this audit was to assess how effectively patients are consented at a busy teaching hospital, and to suggest improvements to the process. Evaluates the level of information attained by patients after giving consent and their overall satisfaction with the process by use of a questionnaire. Results demonstrated that patients were often given incomplete information about their management. Despite this, patients themselves felt that the level of information given to them was appropriate, and allowed them to make an informed decision. Suggests the use of written information sheets and Internet Web sites to supplement the provision of information to patients. These modalities will allow patients to access as much information as they desire, while avoiding any potential anxiety due to provision of excess information.

Details

Clinical Governance: An International Journal, vol. 8 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7274

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 January 2021

Pouyan Esmaeilzadeh, Spurthy Dharanikota and Tala Mirzaei

Patient-centric exchanges, a major type of Health Information Exchange (HIE), empower patients to aggregate and manage their health information. This exchange model helps…

Abstract

Purpose

Patient-centric exchanges, a major type of Health Information Exchange (HIE), empower patients to aggregate and manage their health information. This exchange model helps patients access, modify and share their medical information with multiple healthcare organizations. Although existing studies examine patient engagement, more research is required to investigate patients' attitudes and willingness to play an active role in patient-centered information exchange. The study's main objective is to develop a model based on the belief-attitude-intention paradigm to empirically examine the effects of patients' attitudes toward engagement in care on their willingness to participate in patient-centric HIE.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted an online survey study to identify the antecedents and consequences of patients' attitudes toward engagement in care. To empirically test the research model, the authors collected data from a national sample (n = 357) of individuals in the United States. The data were analyzed using structural equation modeling (SEM).

Findings

The proposed model categorizes the antecedents to patients' attitudes toward engagement in patient-related and healthcare system factors. The results show that patient-related factors (perceived health literacy and perceived coping ability) and health system factors (perceived experience with the healthcare organization and perceived patient-provider interaction) significantly shape patient attitude toward care management engagement. The results indicate that patients' attitudes toward engaging in their healthcare significantly contribute to their willingness to participate in medical information sharing through patient-centric HIE initiatives. Moreover, the authors’ findings also demonstrate that the link between patient engagement and willingness to participate in HIE is stronger for individuals who perceive lower levels of privacy and security concerns.

Originality/value

The authors validate the proposed model explaining patients' perceptions about their characteristics and the healthcare system significantly influence their attitude toward engaging in their care. This study also suggests that patients' favorable attitude toward engagement can bring patient-centric HIE efforts onto a path to success. The authors’ research attempts to shed light on the importance of patients' roles in adopting patient-centric HIE initiatives. Theoretical and practical contributions of this study are noticeable since they could result in a deeper understanding of the concept of patient engagement and how it may affect healthcare services in an evolving digital world. The authors’ findings can help healthcare organizations provide public citizen-centric services by introducing user-oriented approaches in healthcare delivery systems.

Details

Information Technology & People, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-3845

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 October 2009

Michael V. Laric and Dennis A. Pitta

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the threats to patient privacy inherent in the movement to reduce health care costs by digitizing health care information.

1244

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the threats to patient privacy inherent in the movement to reduce health care costs by digitizing health care information.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper applies relevant organizational theories to the health care information privacy arena, and predicts different privacy outcomes depending on the model organizations adopt to manage their information processing practices.

Findings

Public policy makers who value preservation of patient health care information privacy, can predict the relative safety of information based on the organizational model used by companies which handle that data. Propositions advanced by these theories to explain business processes are reviewed to the extent they help explore the relationships between the users and managers of the digitized health records, and the privacy of the patients' health‐records. The paper offers a series of implications for marketers based on the framework.

Research limitations/implications

The findings are most applicable to health care systems that do not already sacrifice privacy in the name of economy.

Practical implications

The findings can be used to insure the security of health care information.

Originality/value

The paper addresses a recent trend motivated by the need to make health care accessible to more people. Rising health care costs have forced lawmakers and marketers to seek more efficient processes to reduce costs. One unintended consequence is that economies sacrifice privacy.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 26 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 2 December 2020

Ngoako Solomon Marutha and Olefhile Mosweu

This study sought to investigate a framework for ensuring the confidentiality and security of information at the public health-care facilities to curb HIV/AIDS trauma…

Abstract

Purpose

This study sought to investigate a framework for ensuring the confidentiality and security of information at the public health-care facilities to curb HIV/AIDS trauma among patients in Africa. In most instances, trauma to HIV/AIDS patients accelerate because of their personal information relating to the state of illness leaks to public people.

Design/methodology/approach

This qualitative study used literature to study confidentiality and security of information at the public health-care facilities to curb HIV/AIDS trauma among patients in Africa.

Findings

The study revealed that confidentiality and security of information has been neglected, in most instances, at the health-care facilities, and this has, to some extent, affected HIV/AIDS patients negatively, leading to trauma, stigma and skipping of treatment by patients resulting in accelerated mortality among chronic patients. The study recommends that patientsinformation be always strictly controlled and kept confidential and secured at all the times, especially that of HIV/AIDS patients.

Practical implications

The proposed framework can be used by health-care facilities to guide the management and promotion of the confidentiality and security of information in the public health-care facilities to curb additional trauma to HIV/AIDS patients in the context of Africa, and even beyond.

Originality/value

The study provides a framework to ensure the confidentiality and security of information at the public health-care facilities to curb additional trauma to HIV/AIDS patients.

1 – 10 of over 33000