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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2016

Sonja Spiranec, Mihaela Banek Zorica and Denis Kos

The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to the theoretical and pragmatic positioning of critical information literacy by interpreting it in the light of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to make a contribution to the theoretical and pragmatic positioning of critical information literacy by interpreting it in the light of epistemological shifts brought about by Web 2.0. Epistemological shifts are elaborated from educational and institutional perspectives as well as from that of scientific research.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper brings a theoretical analysis drawing on relevant literature for the purpose of identifying the grounds for the mapping of concepts associated with critical information literacy and participatory information environments. Based on descriptive analysis, the paper clarifies distinctions between/participatory/and /information bank/environments and identifies correlations existing between CIL and participatory information environments.

Findings

There are conceptual disagreements between IL as it was defined and perceived by Zurkowski and how it has to be perceived in the context of contemporary participatory information environments. Current environments are congruent with the core principles and values of critical information literacy and call for the reshaping of IL by introducing into it critical and transformative elements. Not technological aspects of Web 2.0 are crucial in this regard, but epistemological shifts.

Practical implications

Owing to the fact that Web 2.0 and critical information literacy share many similar features, information environments based on participatory technologies and services provide a context ideally suited for the application of the principles of CIL.

Social implications

The paper highlights the correlating dimensions between Web 2.0 and critical information literacy and proposes that Web 2.0 makes necessary a more critical outlook on information literacy.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the correlating dimensions between Web 2.0 and critical information literacy, indicates specific differences between information literacy and critical information literacy and closes with the conclusion that Web 2.0 makes necessary a more critical outlook on information literacy.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 72 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 3 June 2014

Donna Witek and Teresa Grettano

The purpose of this paper is to offer a model of information literacy instruction that utilizes social media to teach metaliteracy as the foundation for information

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to offer a model of information literacy instruction that utilizes social media to teach metaliteracy as the foundation for information literacy today and articulate the effects of social media on students’ information-seeking behaviors and processes and complete the goals articulated in part one of this study (Witek and Grettano, 2012).

Design/methodology/approach

The study was conducted in conjunction with the course rhetoric and social media, co-designed and co-taught by the authors. Data sources consisted of student work and methodologies including textual and rhetorical analysis and observation. Findings are analyzed and presented through the lens of the Association of College and Research Libraries Standards (2000) and Mackey and Jacobson’s (2011) metaliteracy framework.

Findings

The study identified four effects of social media use on students’ information literacy practices and behaviors: information now comes to users; information recall and attribution are now social; evaluation is now social; and information is now open. Data illustrate metaliteracy in practice and tie examples of this to the authors’ pedagogical decisions.

Research limitations/implications

Article offers a model for teaching information literacy in the context of participatory information environments which can be adapted by other practitioners. Authors concede that the small sample size, limited by course enrollment, limits the generalizability of the study findings to student populations as a whole.

Originality/value

Valuable to information literacy instructors and researchers because it offers the first formal application of concepts theorized in Mackey and Jacobson’s (2011) metaliteracy framework to information literacy instruction.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Marek Deja and Dorota Rak

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of metaliteracy on collaborative and individual information behaviour (IB) among academic staff. The goal is to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influence of metaliteracy on collaborative and individual information behaviour (IB) among academic staff. The goal is to observe the impact of these competencies on knowledge management (KM) and IB in research tasks connected with the humanities and social sciences.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper presents an implementation of two combined frameworks into a study on the IB of academics: metacompetencies described by Mackey and Jacobson in the metaliteracy model and Burke’s triple-A model. By using the Dervin’s micro-moment time-line interview framework, authors try to observe the state of development of information literacy and other supportive competencies among younger lecturers and researchers.

Findings

Scientists develop patterns of collaborative behaviour based on seven metaliteracy areas in KM.

Research limitations/implications

The study did not include students and other groups related to the academic environment. Their involvement in information processes is a very wide issue and should be the subject of a separate article.

Originality/value

The paper contributes to research development in the area of information literacy as a KM efficiency factor. IB in this paper is a broad concept, in which the development of metaliteracy is an important aspect of lecturers’ and researchers’ KM and collaboration skills.

Details

Aslib Journal of Information Management, vol. 71 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-3806

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2015

Peter Stordy

Digital technologies have transformed what it means to be literate and to experience literacy. Various literacies have been coined to capture this transformation including…

Abstract

Purpose

Digital technologies have transformed what it means to be literate and to experience literacy. Various literacies have been coined to capture this transformation including established literacies like computer literacy, information literacy, digital literacy, media literacy and internet literacy, to newer conceptions like transliteracy, metaliteracy and multimodal literacy. The purpose of this paper is to assimilate the various conceptions of literacy and literacy types is becoming increasingly more complex. There is a need for a taxonomy of literacies that reflects more recent developments, one that more comprehensively captures the current literacy landscape and one that might have affordances in the future.

Design/methodology/approach

“Library and Information Science Abstracts” (LISA), “Education Resources Information Center” (ERIC) and “British Education Index” were searched for documents relating to digital technologies and literacy. Relevant documents were retrieved and reviewed. This was followed by selective backward and forward citation searching and a further review of relevant documents.

Findings

Based on a review of the literature, two significant dimensions of literacy were identified. These dimensions were used to create a literacy framework to enable the classification of literacies and literacy types, i.e. a taxonomy of literacies. This taxonomy was successfully applied to various prominent literacies and literacy types.

Research limitations/implications

The literacy framework was only applied to those literacies and literacy types that are directly or indirectly related to digital technologies.

Originality/value

There have been a few attempts to classify some literacy types. When conceived, these classifications comprehensively captured some aspect of the literacy landscape. However, they are now dated and there is a need for a taxonomy of literacies that meets the needs identified above. This paper proposes a taxonomy that meets these criteria.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. 71 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

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Article
Publication date: 16 December 2019

Lifeng Han and Zhenbo Lu

Student participation has been an important issue for information literacy (IL) teachings. The purpose of this paper is to promote active student participation in IL…

Abstract

Purpose

Student participation has been an important issue for information literacy (IL) teachings. The purpose of this paper is to promote active student participation in IL courses with Rain Classroom, an intelligent teaching tool.

Design/methodology/approach

Using mixed method research, the paper presents a practical case study of the author’s experiences with Rain Classroom to improve teaching and learning of IL.

Findings

The study shows that Rain Classroom helps implement problem-based learning, promote student participation in class interaction and optimize learning experience, which facilitates a shift of the IL course from passive to active learning.

Research limitations/implications

It is known that university public courses have large class sizes (more than 50 students per class), and, therefore, class interaction is difficult to organize. So this is a big issue for the researchers to study.

Practical implications

The proposed Rain Classroom is a free teaching tool and can be used in other academic libraries to enhance active student participation in IL lessons.

Social implications

The paper includes implications for improving interaction in large-size conference or trainings using Rain Classroom.

Originality/value

The existing literature has not traced the reports on using the Rain Classroom to enhance student participation in IL courses in academic libraries. This paper intends to fill this gap and share practical methods and experiences, deepening the application research of Rain Classroom.

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Article
Publication date: 10 January 2020

Katherine Hanz and Emily Sarah Kingsland

The purpose of this paper seeks to provide an in-depth overview of a series of fake news information literacy library workshops, which were offered 19 times over the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper seeks to provide an in-depth overview of a series of fake news information literacy library workshops, which were offered 19 times over the course of 2 years. It examines the results of a fake news game, which was played with a wide variety of audiences.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study examines workshops offered by two librarians at [name of institution], a major research institution in [city], [country]. It describes the workshops in detail and demonstrates how others may adopt this model.

Findings

The authors found that while high school students proved to be the most adept at recognizing fake news, the literature suggests that mere exposure to digital media is not sufficient in preparing Generation Z in their digital literacy critical assessment skills.

Practical implications

Library and information professionals are provided with the tools to adapt this workshop to suit the needs of their respective users.

Originality/value

This paper examines how a workshop can be adapted to seven unique audiences, spanning from high school students to university alumni. It incorporates the Association of College and Research Libraries framework and the latest literature into informing its practice.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 48 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 8 January 2018

Christine Urquhart

This paper aims to examine the principles that underpin library assessment, methods used for impact and performance evaluation and how academic libraries should use the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the principles that underpin library assessment, methods used for impact and performance evaluation and how academic libraries should use the findings, and it discusses how value frameworks help.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a literature review covering aspects of value (value propositions, value co-creation), value frameworks (including the 2015 ACRL framework, Holbrook typology with worked example), data analytics and collaborative projects including LibQUAL+ initiatives and the use of balanced scorecard principles (including a values scorecard).

Findings

The use of data analytics in library assessment requires collaboration among library services to develop reliable data sets. Scorecards help ongoing impact and performance evaluation. Queries that arise may require a framework, or logic model, to formulate suitable questions and assemble evidence (qualitative and quantitative) to answer new questions about the value of library services. The perceived value framework of Holbrook’s typology, the values scorecard and the ACRL framework all support the deeper level of inquiry required.

Research limitations/implications

Includes examples of possible application of frameworks.

Practical implications

A value framework might help data analytic approaches in combining qualitative and quantitative data.

Social implications

Impact assessment may require assessing how value is co-created with library users in use of e-resources and open data.

Originality/value

The study contrasts the varying approaches to impact evaluation and library assessment in academic libraries, and it examines more in-depth value frameworks.

Details

Information and Learning Science, vol. 119 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-5348

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Article
Publication date: 31 May 2019

Julia Feerrar

Institutions seeking to develop or expand digital literacy programs face the challenge of navigating varied definitions for digital literacy itself. In answer to this…

Abstract

Purpose

Institutions seeking to develop or expand digital literacy programs face the challenge of navigating varied definitions for digital literacy itself. In answer to this challenge, this paper aims to share a process for developing a shared framework for digital literacy at one institution, including drawing on themes in existing frameworks, soliciting campus feedback and making revisions.

Design/methodology/approach

A draft digital literacy framework was created following the work of an initial library task force. Focus groups were conducted to gather feedback on the framework and to identify areas for future development.

Findings

Focus groups yielded 38 written responses. Feedback themes related to gaps in the framework, structural suggestions and common challenges for learners. Themes in focus group feedback led to several framework revisions, including the addition of Curation as a competency area, the removal of information communication technologies as its own competency area, and the inclusion of Learner rather than Student at the center of the framework.

Practical implications

The approaches described in this case study can be adapted by those looking to create a shared framework or definition for digital literacy on their campuses, as well as to create or revise definitions for other related literacies.

Originality/value

This case study presents an adaptable process for getting started with broad digital literacy initiatives, within the context of existing digital literacy frameworks worldwide.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 47 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Meredith Farkas

This paper seeks to explore the impact participatory technologies have had on education and the information environment in which students operate. It seeks to define a…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper seeks to explore the impact participatory technologies have had on education and the information environment in which students operate. It seeks to define a pedagogical approach that will capitalize on the benefits of participatory technologies in the classroom and applies this “pedagogy 2.0” to information literacy instruction.

Design/methodology/approach

A thorough literature review was conducted on the use of participatory technologies in education as well as theories related to collaborative learning. This review formed the basis of the proposed pedagogy 2.0 model.

Findings

Web 2.0 and the growth in use of participatory technologies has had a tremendous impact on the information environment. Instructors seeking to take advantage of participatory technologies in the classroom should also consider altering the classroom learning environment to one that embraces social constructivist and connectivist pedagogies. Changes in the information environment also require a corresponding shift in the way information literacy is conceptualized and taught.

Practical implications

This paper suggests an approach to teaching that instructors can adopt to capitalize on participatory technologies in the classroom and improve student learning.

Originality/value

This article seeks to bridge the gap between educational research on 2.0 pedagogies and the use of participatory technologies, and the library literature about the impact of Web 2.0 on information literacy. It suggests ways to make the conceptualization and teaching of information literacy more relevant to the current information environment.

Details

Library Hi Tech, vol. 30 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0737-8831

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Article
Publication date: 20 July 2021

Valerie Nesset, Elisabeth C. Davis, Owen Stewart-Robertson and J. Brice Bible

This paper examines how bonded design (BD), a participatory design methodology, was influenced by the transition to working in a virtual environment necessitated by the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper examines how bonded design (BD), a participatory design methodology, was influenced by the transition to working in a virtual environment necessitated by the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

Abiding by the participatory design tenets of creativity, learning-by-doing and mutual learning, the BD methodology was created for the specific purpose of fostering meaningful communication and interaction between two disparate groups. Previous iterations of BD are discussed, including its naissance with intergenerational teams, its adaptation to provide a framework for a university-wide initiative, the Faculty Information Technology (IT) Liaison Program that brought together faculty members and IT professional staff, and its current use in helping public librarians to develop with older adults, targeted library programming and services.

Findings

Analysis of the findings from the assessment of the BD methodology in different physical contexts demonstrates that the flexibility in the makeup and order of design techniques (discussion, evaluation, brainstorming, prototyping, consensus-building) makes BD potentially adaptable to online spaces. Recommendations for implementing the BD methodology online are outlined. It is argued that BD’s adaptability makes it an ideal method for creating meaningful and productive collaborations within both physical and virtual environments.

Originality/value

The proposed iteration of the BD methodology responds to a need for innovative practices to foster collaborative work in a virtual environment. BD is a unique, inclusive and cost-effective methodology to encourage meaningful interaction and communication between disparate groups in physical or online contexts.

Details

Journal of Documentation, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0022-0418

Keywords

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