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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2000

Hannelore B. Rader

Presents a summary review of 25 years of the literature on user instruction and information literacy. Notes how developments in education and technology during the last…

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1074

Abstract

Presents a summary review of 25 years of the literature on user instruction and information literacy. Notes how developments in education and technology during the last ten years have affected user instruction and have led to the emergence of information literacy. Demonstrates how the field of user instruction has expanded. A total of 28 publications were reviewed in 1973, and 286 publications were reviewed in 1998 – 25 years later. The title of the literature review changed over the same period from “Library Orientation and Instruction” to “Library Instruction and Information Literacy”.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 28 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 13 February 2009

Michael Mounce

The purpose of this paper is to provide an annotated bibliography of resources on the topic of academic librarians collaborating with English composition faculty and…

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1103

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to provide an annotated bibliography of resources on the topic of academic librarians collaborating with English composition faculty and instructors for the implementation of information literacy instruction into English composition courses.

Design/methodology/approach

In order to find relevant resources for the bibliography, the author consulted a library catalog, the WorldCat database, to find books not available in the local library, and databases to find journal articles. Databases consulted include a general database, an information science‐related database, and a library and information science‐related database.

Findings

Whenever librarians collaborate with English composition faculty for information literacy, students' information literacy skills are improved.

Research limitations/implications

This bibliography is limited to the time period 1998‐2007. Articles and books published before 1998 are not included. Also, popular magazines articles and newspapers articles are not included.

Practical implications

This paper will be helpful to academic librarians who want to collaborate with English composition faculty members for information literacy instruction. Several examples of this type of collaboration are provided.

Originality/value

This paper is a useful contribution on this topic to the library literature. Particularly, it contributes to the library literature pertaining to information literacy. Also, a database search indicates that this paper is the first annotated bibliography on its topic.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 37 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1990

J. Edmund Maynard

In this emerging computer‐information age, library instruction goes far beyond research familiarity with books. With the advent of both library OPAC (online public access…

Abstract

In this emerging computer‐information age, library instruction goes far beyond research familiarity with books. With the advent of both library OPAC (online public access catalogs) and end‐user searching of online and CD‐ROM (compact disk read only memory) databases, the need for improved instruction in library use approaches a new plateau. These new technologies are forcing libraries, as well as their patrons, to move from traditional information handling to a total information support system.

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Reference Services Review, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 29 August 2021

Martin Quinn, João Oliveira and Alicia Santidrián

This paper aims to detail the evolution of accounting controls conveyed as written rules at the Society of Jesus from the middle of the 17th century to the present day.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to detail the evolution of accounting controls conveyed as written rules at the Society of Jesus from the middle of the 17th century to the present day.

Design/methodology/approach

An analytically structured history approach is adopted. Four “Instructions” are analysed in detail and institutional theory is used as a lens to examine influences on accounting control rules over time.

Findings

The analysis reveals that accounting control rules maintained a core stability over time but were adapted and extended according to internal and external factors. Changes to the rules were thus mostly evolutionary. Influenced by mainly external factors, over the years the rules have become more detailed and accompanied by more practical guidance.

Originality/value

This study provides an analysis of the evolution of accounting control rules at the Society of Jesus, which thus far has not been presented. It provides insights on how the rules introduced more clarity and highlights the increasing recognition of secular management control and development within the Jesuit rules.

Details

Journal of Management History, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1751-1348

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Article
Publication date: 31 August 2021

Tessa Withorn, Jillian Eslami, Hannah Lee, Maggie Clarke, Carolyn Caffrey Gardner, Cristina Springfield, Dana Ospina, Anthony Andora, Amalia Castañeda, Alexandra Mitchell, Joanna Messer Kimmitt, Wendolyn Vermeer and Aric Haas

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper presents recently published resources on library instruction and information literacy, providing an introductory overview and a selected annotated bibliography of publications covering various library types, study populations and research contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper introduces and annotates English-language periodical articles, monographs, dissertations, reports and other materials on library instruction and information literacy published in 2020.

Findings

The paper provides a brief description of all 440 sources and highlights sources that contain unique or significant scholarly contributions.

Originality/value

The information may be used by librarians, researchers and anyone interested in a quick and comprehensive reference to literature on library instruction and information literacy.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 49 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Book part
Publication date: 26 August 2019

Georgia Earnest García and Christina Passos DeNicolo

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to share empirical research with educators and researchers to show how the gradual release of responsibility (GRR) model can support…

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this study is to share empirical research with educators and researchers to show how the gradual release of responsibility (GRR) model can support bilingual teachers’ implementation of dialogic reading comprehension instruction in student-led small groups and linguistically responsive literacy instruction with emergent bilingual students (Spanish–English) in grades one through four.

Design/Methodology/Approach – The authors provide brief literature reviews on the literacy instruction that bilingual students in low-resourced schools typically receive, on dialogic reading comprehension instruction, and on linguistically responsive literacy instruction. Then, the authors show how teacher educators utilized the GRR framework and process to support bilingual teachers’ movement from whole-class, teacher-directed instruction to dialogic reading comprehension instruction in student-led small groups. Next, the authors illustrate how a third-grade dual-language teacher employed the GRR to teach her students how to use Spanish–English cognates. Lastly, the authors share three vignettes from a first-grade bilingual teacher’s use of the GRR to facilitate her students’ comprehension of teacher read-alouds of narrative and informational texts and English writing.

Findings – When the teacher educators employed the GRR model in combination with socio-constructivist professional staff development, the teachers revealed their concerns about small-group instruction. The teacher educators adjusted their instruction and support to address the teachers’ concerns, helping them to implement small-group instruction. The third-grade bilingual teacher employed the GRR to teach her students how to use a translanguaging strategy, cognates, when writing, spelling, and reading. The first-grade bilingual teacher’s use of the GRR during teacher read-alouds in Spanish and English provided space for her and her students’ translanguaging, and facilitated the students’ comprehension of narrative and informational texts and completion of an English writing assignment.

Research Limitations/Implications – The findings were brief vignettes of effective instruction in bilingual settings that employed the GRR model. Although the authors discussed the limitations of scripted instruction, they did not test it. Additional research needs to investigate how other teacher educators and teachers use the GRR model to develop and implement instructional innovations that tap into the unique language practices of bilingual students.

Practical Implications – The empirical examples should help other teacher educators and bilingual teachers to implement the GRR model to support the improved literacy instruction of bilingual students in grades one through four. The chapter defines linguistically responsive instruction, and shows how translanguaging can be used by bilingual teachers and students to improve the students’ literacy performance.

Originality/Value of Chapter – This chapter provides significant research-based examples of the use of the GRR model with bilingual teachers and students at the elementary level. It shows how employment of the model can provide bilingual teachers and students with the support needed to implement instructional literacy innovations and linguistically responsive instruction.

Details

The Gradual Release of Responsibility in Literacy Research and Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78769-447-7

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Book part
Publication date: 22 February 2010

Michael Faggella-Luby and Patricia Sampson Graner

In response to the urgent national need to implement evidence-based literacy supports for adolescent struggling readers (ASRs), this chapter provides a framework for…

Abstract

In response to the urgent national need to implement evidence-based literacy supports for adolescent struggling readers (ASRs), this chapter provides a framework for addressing reading comprehension instruction. Schools face significant challenges in the education of ASRs including how to address the achievement gap that emerges between proficient readers and a variety of poor reader subgroups predicted by the Simple View of Reading. The authors present current research in the components of reading comprehension (e.g., text structures, vocabulary, prior knowledge, cognitive strategies, and motivation) and explicit pedagogical practices associated with improving outcomes for ASRs, including a school-wide framework called the Content Literacy Continuum. Two specific interventions with supporting research are presented as model practices to improve outcomes for ASRs.

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Literacy and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-777-6

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Book part
Publication date: 22 February 2010

Margo A. Mastropieri, Thomas E. Scruggs, Yojanna Cuenca-Sanchez, Nancy Irby, Sara Mills, Linda Mason and Richard Kubina

An exploratory study was undertaken to examine the implementation of strategy instruction in persuasive writing with a class of 10 adolescent students with severe…

Abstract

An exploratory study was undertaken to examine the implementation of strategy instruction in persuasive writing with a class of 10 adolescent students with severe emotional/behavioral disabilities (EBD). Several learner characteristics were observed to interact with curriculum and instructional variables. Modifications were made, on an ongoing basis, to respond to these student characteristics. After approximately four months of instruction, findings indicated that all students had mastered the components of effective persuasive essay writing, and performed competently on criterion writing measures, greatly different from performance at the beginning of instruction. Although the design of this investigation does not allow for definitive causal explanations, insights were gained regarding the interaction between EBD characteristics and strategy instruction. Implications for further research are discussed.

Details

Literacy and Learning
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-777-6

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Book part
Publication date: 8 August 2005

William E. Gustashaw and Frederick J. Brigham

Several criteria were used for this study to determine the relevance of the literature for the purpose of the review. First, all articles were required to be published in…

Abstract

Several criteria were used for this study to determine the relevance of the literature for the purpose of the review. First, all articles were required to be published in peer-reviewed journals. Next, all articles were required to be primary sources. Reviews of the literature found throughout the search procedures were used as supporting information, as well as the basis for this review. Only quantitative studies were included in this review; opinion papers and qualitative studies were not incorporated into the results. The participants in each study had to be identified as having a learning disability. Studies that included regular education students as a control or comparative group were included as long as the treatment group included students with learning disabilities. The students with learning disabilities were required to possess verbal deficits. Those studies that examined students with non-verbal learning disabilities were excluded from this review. All studies were required to be in English and conducted in the United States.

Details

Cognition and Learning in Diverse Settings
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84950-353-2

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Book part
Publication date: 30 September 2020

Julia B. Lindsey, Rachelle Kuehl and Heidi Anne Mesmer

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to provide research-based information to foster positive discussions about the need for phonics and phonemic awareness instruction

Abstract

Purpose: The purpose of this chapter is to provide research-based information to foster positive discussions about the need for phonics and phonemic awareness instruction in the primary grades. In order to read, students must possess secure knowledge of the alphabetic principle (i.e., that speech sounds are represented by combinations of letters in the alphabet) as well as the ability to aurally separate the distinct sounds (phonemes) that make up words.

Design: In this chapter, the authors provide essential definitions of phonics and phonemic awareness terms, highlight peer-reviewed research and best instructional practices, and clarify findings in relation to the recently renewed controversy over how to effectively teach reading to young children. The authors draw from respected research journals and years of classroom experience to provide recommendations to literacy teachers.

Findings: Explicit, systematic phonics instruction is crucial for beginning readers because most children will not intuit phonics concepts. To set the stage for phonics instruction (connecting speech sounds with their written representations), students must understand how to separate sounds in words. Therefore, instruction in phonemic awareness must be given independently of alphabetic representations; that is, students need to be able to hear the distinct sounds before mapping them onto written words. Once a student has mastered this understanding, however, instructional time need not be devoted to its development.

Practical Implications: This chapter contributes to the literature on phonics and phonemic awareness by clearly explaining the differences between the two concepts and their necessary inclusion in any beginning reading program. It includes practical activities teachers can use to develop these understandings in the classroom and provides research evidence to support their use.

Details

What’s Hot in Literacy: Exemplar Models of Effective Practice
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83909-874-1

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