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Article
Publication date: 30 November 2018

Lois Marjorie Hazelton, Laurence Murray Gillin, Fiona Kerr, Alison Kitson and Noel Lindsay

Within the “wicked” concept of ageing, this paper aims to primarily model an integrated approach to identifying and evaluating opportunities that deliver innovative…

Abstract

Purpose

Within the “wicked” concept of ageing, this paper aims to primarily model an integrated approach to identifying and evaluating opportunities that deliver innovative outcomes in Ageing Well Practice, Health and Economic Policy and Research Actions using a collaborative and entrepreneurial mindset. The strategic focus is on a “Boomer” (user)-driven and facilitated Network – that brings together health professionals, research specialists, technologists, ageing well providers, “encore” career specialists, life-style providers, community groups, wealth creation specialists and industry innovators to streamline the progression of identified concepts to valued users and markets and enhance the economy.

Design/methodology/approach

Using the unit of analysis for innovation, i.e. the “added-value” as perceived by the user and not simply a product or a technology, the identified “opportunity-outcome” will embed a new service concept or intervention, which embraces and promotes ageing well, independent living or resident-centred care in the community and delivers direct and indirect economic benefits.

Findings

The authors model a point of differentiation in facilitating existing ageing well policies in the community, through a focus on an integrated and multi-dimensional collaborative framework that can deliver user value and contributes to community and economic benefits.

Research limitations/implications

Generalising results without a commercial business case from this single strategic viewpoint requires caution. The positive outcomes from this innovation collaborative concept can be used to guide further policy development and business investment in ageing well needs.

Practical implications

Such an integrated innovation collaborative structure provides the capacity to identify ageing well opportunities, to contract enterprises, both SMEs’ and larger companies, for development of the opportunities into user-valued outcomes, to network venture resources and deliver these outcomes to a sustainable market of ageing well citizens.

Social implications

The Ageing Well Innovation collaborative framework identifies practical ways to integrate new concepts of ageing participation to be realised by the increasing number of “Boomers”. It provides a self-managing process for linking individuals, public and private parties to maximise information and ideas flow, and engagement of the skilled resources in the Boomer group.

Originality/value

The innovation collaborative structure proposed is not simply novel but is a targeted focus on entrepreneurship and innovation applied strategically to the needs of ageing boomers and community needs. The added-value is in the demonstrated enhancement to effective innovation outcomes in community ageing and the economy.

Details

Journal of Business Strategy, vol. 40 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0275-6668

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 6 June 2020

Pi-Shen Seet, Noel Lindsay and Fredric Kropp

This study presents and validates a theoretical model linking individual characteristics of the founding or lead innovative entrepreneur of a start-up venture – the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study presents and validates a theoretical model linking individual characteristics of the founding or lead innovative entrepreneur of a start-up venture – the entrepreneur's values, entrepreneurial attitudes and entrepreneurial self-efficacy – to the firm's entrepreneurial orientation (EO) and market orientation (MO) and, ultimately, to firm performance.

Design/methodology/approach

We conducted a survey on a stratified random sample of founders of early-stage South Australian micro- and small enterprises with a response rate of 24% (N = 204). Structural equation modelling was used to evaluate the model.

Findings

The study found that there is a significant relationship between the individual lead entrepreneur and firm strategies developed in early-stage firms in explaining firm performance. It also found that internal values are positively related to entrepreneurial attitude. Entrepreneurial attitude is positively related to entrepreneurial self-efficacy and EO innovativeness. In turn, entrepreneurial self-efficacy is related to innovativeness, proactiveness and risk-taking. The proactiveness dimension of EO and entrepreneurial attitude is related to MO. Entrepreneurial self-efficacy, innovativeness and MO are related to firm performance.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to entrepreneurial ventures in South Australia and may lack generalisability in other states and countries.

Originality/value

The research contributes to the understanding of the heterogeneity within self-employed individuals, in particular among innovative entrepreneurs, by expanding insights regarding antecedents and consequences of the entrepreneurial process. It develops insights into the links of individual-level constructs with firm-level constructs to develop a more meaningful understanding of new venture creation and performance. It enhances our knowledge of the heterogeneity within the group of self-employed by exploring the individual entrepreneurial antecedents of performance in early-stage firms.

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Article
Publication date: 4 June 2020

Michael Browne, Peter Balan and Noel Lindsay

The business model plays a key role in the survival and success of any business. In the family business context, the business model includes more than purely economic…

Abstract

Purpose

The business model plays a key role in the survival and success of any business. In the family business context, the business model includes more than purely economic variables, and it is vital to recognise and identify these for sound business decision-making. This empirical and grounded research clarifies the nature of the business model for small family wineries and, for the first time, specifies four key non-economic or socio-emotional wealth dimensions of the business models for these enterprises.

Design/methodology/approach

The nature of business models is identified by analysing qualitative data from in-depth interviews with decision-makers in small family wineries in Australia. This was done using an abductive approach that produces maps identifying the key dimensions of their business models.

Findings

This research supports the construct of socio-emotional wealth by clarifying the non-economic sources of value in these businesses, while not ignoring economic sources of value. In particular, this grounded study identifies “being special”, “tradition”, “relationships” and “control” as key dimensions of socio-emotional value.

Research limitations/implications

This research provides empirical support for the emerging view that non-economic value should be incorporated into the business model construct. In particular, it specifies four key dimensions of socio-emotional wealth in the firm that are incorporated in a proposed empirical model of the business model of family wine businesses that is appropriate for further study. This research was carried out with cases in one industry that were as similar as possible to obtain robust findings and provides the basis for generalisation through replication in other industries and in other categories of family businesses.

Practical implications

This research has significant practical implications associated with the concept of value. The particular dimensions of value as perceived by business owners need to be considered explicitly by business owners and advisors in their strategic and operational decision-making.

Originality/value

Small family wineries represent most enterprises operating in the global wine industry. This research study provides empirical support for the role of socio-emotional wealth, or the non-economic components, in their business models. In particular, this study specifies key dimensions for socio-emotional wealth, and the findings have conceptual as well as practical value.

Details

Journal of Family Business Management, vol. 11 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2043-6238

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 2002

Justin Craig and Noel J. Lindsay

This research furthers our understanding of the interaction between the fields of entrepreneurship and family business. It presents a framework that introduces the family…

Abstract

This research furthers our understanding of the interaction between the fields of entrepreneurship and family business. It presents a framework that introduces the family dynamic to Timmons’ driving forces model of entrepreneurship. The framework highlights the influence of the family in the entrepreneurship process and the importance of the fit among the three driving forces and the family. It highlights the importance of, and the pivotal roles played by, outside boards of directors when entrepreneurial activities are undertaken by family businesses. Using extracts from interviews with family and non‐family executives and board members, the research employs a single case study that describes an actual series of events to provide a practical application of the theory.

Details

Journal of Small Business and Enterprise Development, vol. 9 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1462-6004

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 14 March 2008

Fredric Kropp, Noel J. Lindsay and Aviv Shoham

This study seeks to examine the interrelationships among three elements of an entrepreneurial orientation (proactiveness, innovativeness, and risk‐taking), age and…

Abstract

Purpose

This study seeks to examine the interrelationships among three elements of an entrepreneurial orientation (proactiveness, innovativeness, and risk‐taking), age and education of the entrepreneur, and the international entrepreneurial business venture (IEBV) start‐up decision.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from a sample of 539 individuals from dynamic internationally focused South African firms. Since the dependent variable is non‐metric and the independent variables associated with the IEBV new entry decision are metric, multiple discriminant analysis was used to test new entry decisions.

Findings

Results indicate that the start‐up decision is positively related to the proactiveness and risk‐taking components of an entrepreneurial orientation and the age of the lead entrepreneur and negatively related to the education of the lead entrepreneur. As predicted, the innovativeness component of entrepreneurial orientation is not a factor in the start‐up decision.

Practical implications

Investors can determine the likelihood of venture start‐up by examining the proactiveness and risk‐taking dimensions of entrepreneurial orientation and the age and education of the lead entrepreneur. Since older and less educated entrepreneurs have a greater likelihood of starting ventures, entrepreneurial training programs may provide greater returns by targeting this age and education group.

Originality/value

This is the first examination of the role of entrepreneurial orientation, age, and the IEBV start‐up decision. It examines South Africa, a more dynamic, changing and hostile business environment. Managers and financiers can enhance their probability of success by developing the proactiveness and risk taking entrepreneurial orientation dimensions.

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 14 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2009

Fredric Kropp, Roxanne Zolin and Noel J. Lindsay

Changes in the environment, including increased environmental complexity, require military supply units to employ a more adaptive strategy in order to enhance military…

Abstract

Changes in the environment, including increased environmental complexity, require military supply units to employ a more adaptive strategy in order to enhance military agility. We extend the Lumpkin and Dess (1996) model and develop propositions that explore the interrelationships between/amongst entrepreneurial orientation (EO); opportunity recognition, evaluation and exploitation; environmental and organizational factors; and organizational performance. We propose that the innovativeness, proactiveness, and risk-taking dimensions of EO are of primary importance in identifying adaptive solutions and that these relationships are moderated by environmental factors. The autonomy and competitive aggressiveness dimensions of EO are important in implementing solutions as adaptive strategies, especially in a military context, and these relationships are moderated by organizational factors. This chapter extends existing theory developed primarily for the civilian sector to the military. Military organizations are more rigid hierarchical structures, and have different measures of performance. At an applied level, this research provides insights for military commanders that can potentially enhance agility and adaptability.

Details

Entrepreneurial Strategic Content
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-422-1

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2015

Graciela Corral de Zubielqui, Janice Jones, Pi-Shen Seet and Noel Lindsay

The purpose of this paper is to understand how and why small to medium enterprises (SMEs) access knowledge from external actors in general and from higher education…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to understand how and why small to medium enterprises (SMEs) access knowledge from external actors in general and from higher education institutions (HEIs) in particular and what is the extent to which these knowledge access pathways affect SME innovativeness.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper involved both quantitative and qualitative approaches: a survey of 1,226 SMEs and a mini case study to follow-up on issues arising from the survey analysis. Survey data were analysed using both non-parametric and multivariate Poisson regression analysis. The case study was based on a medium-sized manufacturing firm in South Australia.

Findings

While there are significant differences between the micro-, small- and medium-sized enterprises, the evidence suggests that SMEs generally use “generic” university–industry knowledge transfer pathways (e.g. published research results) rather than university–industry links with high “relational” involvement. More significantly, the results indicate that SMEs are more likely to rely on organisations other than universities and related R&D enterprises for knowledge acquisition like clients/customers or suppliers. While collaboration is most likely to occur within the same state/territory, or Australia, many SMEs also collaborate internationally, usually as part of normal supplier–customer relationships, reinforcing knowledge acquisition from organisationally proximate partners. These findings are also supported by the case study.

Research limitations/implications

This research was limited to surveying SMEs in one geographic (metropolitan) region in Australia. It also does not account for the different patterns of HEI–SME interactions in different industry sectors. There is also only one case study.

Originality/value

First, the research adds to the few field studies that have investigated accessing knowledge for innovation among SMEs. Specifically, the research contributes to an understanding of the heterogeneous roles that different actors play in facilitating knowledge access for improving innovative SMEs outcomes. Second, the research does not treat all SMEs similarly in terms of size effects but instead accounts for differing SME sizes and how this affects their selection of knowledge access pathways. Third, the research contributes to a small number of studies that attempt to understand how HEIs and SMEs can work better together in the context of a regional innovation system, especially one that is relatively less competitive to the larger economy.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 30 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 September 2006

Fredric Kropp, Noel J. Lindsay and Aviv Shoham

This study examines the interrelationships between aspects of entrepreneurial, market, and learning orientations, and international entrepreneurial business venture (IEBV…

Abstract

Purpose

This study examines the interrelationships between aspects of entrepreneurial, market, and learning orientations, and international entrepreneurial business venture (IEBV) performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 396 entrepreneurs and 143 senior managers from early stage, growth‐oriented firms in the Republic of South Africa. These firms had an international focus in that 20 per cent began exporting from their inception and the remaining 80 per cent either began exporting within three years of inception or planned to export within three years of inception. Given the multidimensional nature of IEBV performance, structural equation modeling (AMOS) was used to test the measurement and substantive models.

Findings

Results indicate that IEBV performance is positively related to the innovativeness component of an entrepreneurial orientation (EO), a market orientation, and a learning orientation. Contrary to expectations, the communications aspect of EO is inversely related to objective performance measures.

Research limitations/implications

By design, only successful IEBVs in South Africa were studied, potentially limiting generalizability.

Practical implications

Financiers can enhance the probability of success by assigning a greater weight to an entrepreneur's creativity.

Originality/value

This is the first examination of the role of all three orientations and multidimensional measures of objective and subjective performance. It examines South Africa, a more dynamic, changing and hostile business environment. Managers and financiers can enhance their probability of success by developing the different orientations.

Details

International Marketing Review, vol. 23 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0265-1335

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 21 May 2009

Abstract

Details

Entrepreneurial Strategic Content
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84855-422-1

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2021

Marleen Damman and Monika Von Bonsdorff

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 42 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

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