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Abstract

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Personnel Review, vol. 46 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Nikos Bozionelos

The study investigated the relationship of career instrumental and expressive intra‐organizational network resources with extrinsic and intrinsic career success and with…

Abstract

The study investigated the relationship of career instrumental and expressive intra‐organizational network resources with extrinsic and intrinsic career success and with the Big‐Five of personality in a sample of 264 white‐collar workers. Total network resources were associated with extrinsic and intrinsic career success above the contribution of human capital, demographics and mentoring received. And instrumental network resources contributed more strongly than expressive network resources to extrinsic career success. Furthermore, instrumental network resources emerged as important for intrinsic evaluations of hierarchical and interpersonal career success while expressive network resources emerged as important for intrinsic evaluations of job and interpersonal career success. There was limited support for the influence of personality on the accumulation of network resources. As hypothesized, conscientiousness was negatively associated with instrumental network resources; however, extra‐version, openness and agreeableness failed to make significant contributions to network resources over and above the contribution of human capital and demographics. The implications of the findings for individual career tactics and for organizational practices are discussed and the limitations of the study are considered along with directions for future research.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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Article

Nikos Bozionelos, Giorgos Bozionelos, Konstantinos Kostopoulos and Panagiotis Polychroniou

This study aims to investigate the relationship of mentoring provided with career success and organizational commitment in the general managerial population.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the relationship of mentoring provided with career success and organizational commitment in the general managerial population.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants were 194 native British who were employed in a variety of jobs, professions and industries in the United Kingdom.

Findings

Mentoring provided was positively associated with objective and subjective career success and with mentoring received. Furthermore, mentoring provided mediated the relationship between mentoring received and both aspects of career success. However, although career‐related mentoring provided was positively associated with mentors' career success and affective organizational commitment, socio‐emotional mentoring provided was unrelated to mentors' career success and was negatively related to their affective commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The study adds to the literature by indicating that, at least in the Anglo‐Saxon organizational environment, mentoring provided, and especially its career‐related dimension, is associated with positive outcomes across occupational, professional and organizational boundaries, and that mentoring receipt increases the likelihood of mentoring provision later in the career.

Practical implications

Encouraging organizational members to provide mentoring for junior colleagues establishes and perpetuates a mentoring cycle, which entails benefits for mentors, protégés and the organization.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the relationship of mentoring provision with career success and organizational commitment in the general working population; hence, to yield generalizable conclusions. In addition it informs on the relative contribution of career‐related and socio‐emotional mentoring provided to mentor's career outcomes.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 16 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Nikos Bozionelos

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship of intra‐organizational network resources with career success and organizational commitment.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship of intra‐organizational network resources with career success and organizational commitment.

Design/methodology/approach

The study utilized survey data from 316 British individuals who composed a highly heterogeneous sample in terms of both organizational roles and employment settings.

Findings

The study finds that total intra‐organizational network resources were related to extrinsic and intrinsic career success, and to affective organizational commitment. Instrumental and expressive network resources were differentially related to career success and organizational commitment.

Research limitations/implications

The relationships were identified after controlling for an array of factors and for mentoring received, which attests to the importance of intra‐organizational network resources for career outcomes and attitudes towards the organization. The cross‐sectional design is a limitation of the study. Future research should investigate moderating factors, and must be extended to cultural clusters other from the Anglo‐Saxon one.

Practical implications

From an individual point of view, building networks of relationships within the organization enhances career prospects, regardless of whether a mentor is present. From an organizational viewpoint, organizational designs and human resource systems that promote the development of informal relationship ties foster those aspects of commitment that have positive consequences and inhibit those that have negative consequences.

Originality/value

The study provided original evidence for the link between intra‐organizational relationship ties and commitment towards the organization. In addition, it consolidated evidence on the relationship of network resources to career success, the distinct nature of instrumental and expressive network resources, and the additive value of network resources and mentoring as parts of social capital.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 37 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

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Article

Nikos Bozionelos

The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive account for careers within the Greek academic system. Historical, cultural and geographical features of the country…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to develop a comprehensive account for careers within the Greek academic system. Historical, cultural and geographical features of the country have created a unique context that has shaped the way academic careers evolve.

Design/methodology/approach

The primary methods of data collection were retrospective participant observation and discussions in interview form with individuals who have had various types of experience with the Greek Higher Education system.

Findings

The major factor that shapes careers in Greek academia is social capital or know-whom that operates within a broader cultural environment where institutional collectivism is extremely low, the in-group – out-group distinction is a major element, and political party affiliation plays a key role in everyday affairs. As a result academic careers in Greece are almost exclusively determined by membership, a priory or earned, to an “in-group” that is linked via blood, family friendship, business and political party ties. This “in-group” uses its social capital to control academic careers across all stages for the benefit of its members.

Research limitations/implications

There are method limitations, but relevant concerns were largely alleviated by precautionary measures and the way data were utilized. Ethnography may be the most appropriate method to disentangle the way networks and social capital impact careers.

Practical implications

Achieving substantive change, such as increasing meritocracy, within a sector may be impossible without considering the broader cultural context that encapsulates it.

Originality/value

The study is among the very first to unveil the “dark side” of social capital, and show how social capital may benefit the interests of in-groups at the expense of the collective.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 19 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Nikos Bozionelos

This paper attempts to demystify the technique of causal path modeling for the non‐specialists by presenting aspects of its value for social science and management…

Abstract

This paper attempts to demystify the technique of causal path modeling for the non‐specialists by presenting aspects of its value for social science and management research and by illustrating common misunderstandings about its attributes. Special emphasis is placed on the real world validity of causal relationships depicted in causal path models and on the information that the data‐fitting properties of causal path models provide regarding this issue. Causal path models that are based on research in antecedents of career success are used to illustrate the points that are made. It is stressed that the validity of causal relationships depicted in causal path models is subject to exactly the same methodological restrictions as the validity of causality claims that are made without the use of causal path modeling; and that the purpose of using quantitative techniques in causal path modeling is not to improve certainty on causality direction.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 8 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Nikos Bozionelos and Stuart Lusher

Reports on the experience of production team leaders and their line managers on the quality of training and development of the former. The setting was the UK plant of a…

Abstract

Reports on the experience of production team leaders and their line managers on the quality of training and development of the former. The setting was the UK plant of a US‐based global organization competing in the telecommunications technology sector. Team leaders’ and line managers’ views were complemented with data from personnel records. The findings suggested that team leaders’ development was perceived to be inadequate in both the technical and leadership domains. Team leaders perceived deficiencies in their technical training and competence; and line managers viewed that team leaders lacked managerial and leadership skills. The analysis of personnel records corroborated those views as it suggested that existing training and development structures were not being properly implemented or designed. This situation can impact unit performance. Suggestions regarding rectification of such situations are made.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 7 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Nikos Bozionelos

Survivor employees and senior management perceptions of career development issues were examined in a downsizing organization. It emerged that the organization lacked a…

Abstract

Survivor employees and senior management perceptions of career development issues were examined in a downsizing organization. It emerged that the organization lacked a coherent strategy for survivors’ career development. The main career development structure, the performance management and appraisal scheme, was generally viewed as inadequate, while the other structures in place, although generally perceived as useful, were underutilized. A substantial proportion of employees considered lateral moves to potentially undermine advancement and security, and senior management views implied a potential lack of wide managerial support for widespread use of this tool. A senior management attitude for selective career development, targeted on an élite group of key employees, was also detected. The study concluded that proper downsizing planning must include a coherent career development strategy for survivors.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 6 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article

Sing Lim Leung and Nikos Bozionelos

The association between the “five‐factor model” of personality and the prototypical image of the effective leader, and the extent to which that image was linked to the…

Abstract

The association between the “five‐factor model” of personality and the prototypical image of the effective leader, and the extent to which that image was linked to the features of transformational leadership were examined in a questionnaire study that involved a sample of 101 Chinese origin individuals in Hong Kong. High levels of extraversion, conscientiousness, agreeableness, emotional stability and openness were perceived as characterizing effective leaders. In line with research on leader emergence in the Anglo‐Saxon culture but contrary to expectations, extraversion was the trait most potently associated with the prototypical notion of the effective leader. And that notion was linked to the features of transformational leadership. The findings also suggested that men and women may partly differ in the criteria they utilize to evaluate leaders. Additional research is necessary, but the findings imply that most of the conclusions on the relationship between personality traits and leader emergence drawn with Anglo‐Saxon samples are generalizable in Confucian societies.

Details

Employee Relations, vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article

Joanna Hughes and Nikos Bozionelos

The purpose of this article is to explore the views of male workers in a male dominated occupation on issues that pertain to work‐life balance.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this article is to explore the views of male workers in a male dominated occupation on issues that pertain to work‐life balance.

Design/methodology/approach

The study was qualitative in nature. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted with 20 bus drivers employed by a single company in order to identify their perceptions on the following: whether issues related to work‐life balance were sources of concern and dissatisfaction; how concern over issues related to work‐life balance was compared to other sources of concern and dissatisfaction; and whether issues related to work‐life balance were linked with withdrawal attitudes and behaviours.

Findings

It emerged that work‐life imbalance was not only a source of concern, but also that it was the major source of dissatisfaction for participants. Furthermore, participants made a clear connection between problems with work‐life balance and withdrawal behaviours, including turnover and non‐genuine sick absence.

Originality/value

The study has value at both scholarly and practice level. At scholarly level, the research investigated an important contemporary issue within a neglected group: male workers in a low profile male dominated occupation. At practice level, the findings suggest that work life imbalance incurs tangible costs to organisations; hence, organisations need to establish human resource systems to deal with it. Furthermore, pertinent legislation may need to be developed and enacted.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 36 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

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