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Article
Publication date: 15 June 2010

Nicola Berg and Dirk Holtbrügge

In the last few years, several empirical studies about the determinants and success factors of global teams have been published. While these studies show many interesting results…

3362

Abstract

Purpose

In the last few years, several empirical studies about the determinants and success factors of global teams have been published. While these studies show many interesting results, they are often focused on single variables such as cultural homogeneity, cooperation length, or task complexity, but rarely analyze the complex relationships between these concepts. The aim of this paper is to explore how members of global teams consider the relevance of different determinants of their cooperation, how these determinants are interrelated, and how they influence team performance.

Design/methodology/approach

In this paper, a network study of global teams in the automotive and airline industries is presented. Based on interviews with the members of nine teams in three companies the software programs NVivo and UCINET were applied for a construct causal network analysis of the relationships between various team characteristics and their impact on team performance.

Findings

The study shows that the interaction of team members from different cultures does not directly impact the productivity and creativity of teams. This relationship is rather influenced by various determinants such as task complexity, language skills, communication media and intercultural training.

Research limitations/implications

A restriction of this study is its regional concentration on teams with members from European cultures. Future research should broaden this perspective and focus on global teams with a more diverse composition in terms of culture. For example, it would be interesting to know whether for global teams in Asia, South America or Asia similar or different determinants are relevant.

Originality/value

The study enhances the knowledge of the complex interrelationships between various determinants of global teams and their impact on team performance. A major methodological contribution is the analysis of real teams, enabling a far more realistic picture than previous experimental studies conducted in this area that deal with simulated teams, whose members do not have a shared past nor a shared future.

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 March 2013

Ronald Venn and Nicola Berg

The paper seeks to offer a novel perspective on “deep benefit management” in inclusive business ventures at the Base‐of‐the‐Pyramid (BoP). Furthermore, it explores tensions…

4226

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to offer a novel perspective on “deep benefit management” in inclusive business ventures at the Base‐of‐the‐Pyramid (BoP). Furthermore, it explores tensions between social impact creation and financial objectives in multinational corporations (MNCs).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper opts for an exploratory research design using empirical data, including an expert interview survey and expert discussions. Data is supplemented by documentary analysis, including corporate publications as well as case and impact studies. The paper applies a nested cross‐case comparison of three sustainability driven initiatives of PHILIPS Electronics.

Findings

The paper provides empirical insights on value creation for customers and partners. Findings indicate the need for “external benefit management”. In addition, MNCs can gain financial as well as non‐financial benefits by venturing at the BoP. “Internal benefit management” should consider employee engagement, reputation, and partnering capabilities. Nevertheless, results indicate conflicts between social and financial objectives to which employees respond with “social intrapreneurship”.

Research limitations/implications

Due to the research methodology, results may not be generalized. Future research is encouraged to corroborate findings.

Practical implications

The paper develops deep benefit management as a powerful tool to plan, manage, and assess value creation in inclusive BoP ventures. Further, the paper proposes to establish protective space in MNCs to capitalize on social intrapreneurship.

Originality/value

This study provides an enhanced understanding of benefits of and barriers for inclusive business. Novel insights on social intrapreneurship are provided additionally.

Details

South Asian Journal of Global Business Research, vol. 2 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2045-4457

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2014

Katrin Held and Nicola Berg

In developed markets, emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) seem to be more discriminated by host country nationals than foreign developed market multinational…

Abstract

Purpose

In developed markets, emerging market multinational enterprises (EMNEs) seem to be more discriminated by host country nationals than foreign developed market multinational enterprises (DMNEs). They are challenged with host country nationals’ prejudices and face a stigma of being from emerging markets. While literature agrees that EMNEs suffer from additional disadvantages due to their country-of-origin, research fails to identify those factors that may lead to a higher discrimination against EMNEs than against foreign DMNEs.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on institutional theory, we look at institutional-related and resource-related antecedents that have an impact on various forms of direct and indirect discrimination by host country nationals.

Originality/value

Our framework analyzes the crucial differences between host country nationals’ perception of EMNEs and foreign DMNEs and the resulting challenges for EMNEs in the developed world. It enhances our understanding of the importance of institutional environments in explaining differences in host country nationals’ discrimination against foreign MNEs.

Details

Multinational Enterprises, Markets and Institutional Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-421-4

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

386

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Content available
Article
Publication date: 2 March 2012

Fiona Lettice

578

Abstract

Details

Team Performance Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 1/2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7592

Content available
Book part
Publication date: 25 October 2014

Abstract

Details

Multinational Enterprises, Markets and Institutional Diversity
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-421-4

Article
Publication date: 11 April 2019

Nicola J. Beatson, David A.G. Berg, Jeffrey K. Smith and Christine Smith-Han

The purpose of this paper is to test the impact of a rule that affects tertiary students progressing from an introductory level finance course to intermediate level. The rule…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to test the impact of a rule that affects tertiary students progressing from an introductory level finance course to intermediate level. The rule restricted students from progressing until they achieved a higher grade than just a “pass” mark.

Design/methodology/approach

Archival data were gathered from 11 semesters regarding student performance pre and post the rule being introduced.

Findings

Results show that the rule was associated with an increase in the chances of success at intermediate level for those students enrolled after the rule was introduced.

Practical implications

This paper’s main contribution regards the evidence that increasing prior learning at an introductory level has a positive follow-on effect for students learning at intermediate level. This has a practical implication for educators, as the rule has shown to increase the chance of success for knowledge development in the first year of studies.

Originality/value

The setting for this paper is unique and could potentially be replicated elsewhere. In 1980, Schaffer and Calkins called for an evaluation of the pre-requisites necessary for finance education at the tertiary level, and this paper answer this call stating that pre-requisites can contribute to the academic success of finance students.

Details

Pacific Accounting Review, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0114-0582

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 6 February 2020

Nicola Beatson, David Berg and Jeffrey K. Smith

The purpose of this study is to investigate failure in an introductory accounting course. Failure rates are often hard to explain and have a cost to both the individual and to the…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to investigate failure in an introductory accounting course. Failure rates are often hard to explain and have a cost to both the individual and to the university. This paper offers insight into this complex matter.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper uses data gathered from a survey instrument on self-efficacy beliefs and personal written reflections from students who had previously failed the introductory accounting course to diagnose why students may have failed.

Findings

The key finding in this paper is that students are individuals and there can be multiple reasons for failure.

Research limitations/implications

One limitation in this paper is the sample size of six-student reflections. This in itself speaks to the difficultly in researching this area, as students are often not willing to face failure and discuss it.

Practical implications

The main contribution from this paper is an awareness for educators, as failure can occur for multiple reasons. This paper both adds to the literature on failure in accounting courses and helps inform educators of why their students may fail.

Originality/value

It is very challenging to research failure and therefore there is very little work on this area. At this time, the authors have no knowledge of any papers, which address the failure rates in introductory accounting courses from the individual perspective. Therefore, this paper has a unique contribution to the field of accounting education.

Details

Accounting Research Journal, vol. 33 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1030-9616

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 May 2023

Ayman wael AL-Khatib

The current study aimed to identify the impact of the dynamic capabilities on the circular economy in Jordan's small- and medium-sized manufacturing enterprises sector as and the…

Abstract

Purpose

The current study aimed to identify the impact of the dynamic capabilities on the circular economy in Jordan's small- and medium-sized manufacturing enterprises sector as and the mediating role of industrial Internet of things.

Design/methodology/approach

This study surveyed small and medium manufacturing enterprises operating in Jordan and collected 459 responses through an online self-administered questionnaire. The effects of dynamic capabilities and the industrial Internet of things on the circular economy were analyzed using covariance-based structural equation modeling (CB-SEM).

Findings

Empirical results showed that all hypotheses are accepted. The results also revealed that the relationship between dynamic capabilities (sensing, seizing and reconfiguring) on a circular economy is mediated by the industrial Internet of things.

Originality/value

This work expanded the application of the dynamic capabilities view to investigate the antecedent effects of the industrial Internet of things and the circular economy and deepened understanding of the dynamic capabilities view theory in assessing the dynamic activities of these firms based on the three dimensions of sensing, seizing and reconfiguring. In general, this study made a theoretical and managerial contribution to supply chain and circular economy literature.

Details

Journal of Manufacturing Technology Management, vol. 34 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1741-038X

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 February 2020

Filippo Vitolla, Nicola Raimo, Michele Rubino and Antonello Garzoni

This study aims to investigate the financial and country-level determinants of integrated reporting quality in the financial industry. Specifically, this study analyses the impact…

3507

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the financial and country-level determinants of integrated reporting quality in the financial industry. Specifically, this study analyses the impact of profitability, size, leverage and civil law system on the integrated reporting quality.

Design/methodology/approach

Hypotheses were tested using a regression model on a sample of 87 financial institutions. An integrated reporting (IR)-quality scoreboard was used to measure report quality.

Findings

The results show that IR quality is significantly and positively influenced by profitability, size, financial leverage and the civil law system.

Practical implications

The results have particularly important implications for large, profitable financial institutions that make greater use of financial leverage and that are localized in non-civil law countries. Managers should increase transparency by expanding the content and quality of the information contained in the integrated reports.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the literature by revealing several financial factors that influence IR quality. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study to investigate IR quality in the context of the financial industry.

Details

Corporate Governance: The International Journal of Business in Society, vol. 20 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1472-0701

Keywords

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