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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2009

Heather Skinner and Robin Croft

This paper aims to address the gap in the extant literature examining the support offered to, and required by, students in light of the changing nature of the…

Abstract

This paper aims to address the gap in the extant literature examining the support offered to, and required by, students in light of the changing nature of the undergraduate dissertation and the changing nature of the student undertaking it. For many, it will be the first time that they will have undertaken a self‐directed, major research project. The focus of this paper is to present the neuro‐linguistic programming (NLP) framework for setting wellformed outcomes that was offered to students in the initial session of a pilot dissertation workshop support programme, initially targeting students completing dissertation projects on marketing topics within the Business School. Unlike modules on Research Methods the focus of this programme was not on methodology, but on soft skills such as goal setting, time management and motivation, along with practical skills such as those required to take advantage of developments in data processing technology. The paper also presents the findings of qualitative data gathered from responses of students in focus groups and in‐depth interviews designed to explore students’ on‐going motivation throughout the dissertation process. The paper concludes with a comparison of the results of those students who took part in the workshop sessions with those that did not.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 8 February 2021

Graham Jones, Bernardita Chirino Chace and Justin Wright

The innovative capacity of an organization is typically realized through unit-level teams. Previous studies correlate innovation performance with cultural diversity of…

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Abstract

Purpose

The innovative capacity of an organization is typically realized through unit-level teams. Previous studies correlate innovation performance with cultural diversity of teams, but note that team dynamics need to be optimized to derive maximum benefit. Herein, this study offers an assessment of available team building instruments through the lens of diverse innovation teams. In a demonstration project in the pharmaceutical industry, this study then outlines specific tools and approaches which can be successfully deployed through team coaching and mentoring.

Design/methodology/approach

A cluster of nine innovation teams with varying degrees of cultural diversity was provided with assessment and management instruments which had been identified and field tested by a mentoring team. Content included cultural awareness tools, innovation team profiling methods and Team Science (SciTS) ideology. Teams were funded, coached and mentored through a six-month performance period and assessed at regular intervals.

Findings

Team assessments provided correlations between performance (measured by project completion and new intellectual property generated) and diversity together with wealth of information on intra-team culture and dynamics. Concrete recommendations from the study include adoption of appropriate communication standards to promote inclusivity, use of SciTS operational tracking metrics to enhance engagement, use of the FourSight group profiling methodology and cultural quotient scale cultural awareness instruments at team-forming stage to promote effective dynamics and enhance inclusivity.

Practical implications

Cultural diversity has a positive impact on innovation teams. This said, for maximum benefit cultural awareness of team members should be optimized to avoid unintended conflicts developing. Such issues can be exacerbated when teams are deployed remotely and preventative measures should be established. These issues became of heightened significance as a result of telecommuting imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic and have longer-term implications, as corporations consider global air travel reduction through environmental concerns. A tracking tool is described to monitor team engagement and promote inclusivity. It is expected that the learnings can influence how teams can best form, normalize and operate within corporate innovation programs and form the basis of long-term impact studies.

Originality/value

This represents the first systematic study on the impact of cultural diversity and team dynamics within innovation programs in the pharmaceutical industry. The tools and methodologies deployed are widely available and can be adopted by innovation teams in many adjacent industries with established innovation ecosystems.

Details

International Journal of Innovation Science, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-2223

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1991

Izabella Taler

Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) represents a new approach to understanding the process of human communication. Developed by Richard Bandler and John Grinder in the early…

Abstract

Neurolinguistic Programming (NLP) represents a new approach to understanding the process of human communication. Developed by Richard Bandler and John Grinder in the early 1970s, it is derived from linguistics, psychology, neurophysiology, kinetics, and cybernetics. NLP is designed to help its users—whether they are therapists, salespersons, or teachers—more quickly gain rapport with their subjects.

Details

Reference Services Review, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0090-7324

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 2009

Gareth Roderique‐Davies

Neuro‐linguistic programming (NLP) is a popular form of inter‐personal skill and communication training. Originating in the 1970s, the technique made specific claims about…

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1014

Abstract

Neuro‐linguistic programming (NLP) is a popular form of inter‐personal skill and communication training. Originating in the 1970s, the technique made specific claims about the ways in which individuals processed the world about them, and quickly established itself, not only as an aid to communication, but as a form of psychotherapy in its own right. Today, NLP is big business with large numbers of training courses, personal development programmes, therapeutic and educational interventions purporting to be based on the principles of NLP. This paper explores what NLP is, the evidence for it, and issues related to its use. It concludes that after three decades, there is still no credible theoretical basis for NLP, researchers having failed to establish any evidence for its efficacy that is not anecdotal.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1987

PACE (Performance and Communication Enterprises Ltd), a new company specialising in the development of people in business, was launched in March. James Elles, Euro MP for…

Abstract

PACE (Performance and Communication Enterprises Ltd), a new company specialising in the development of people in business, was launched in March. James Elles, Euro MP for Oxfordshire and Buckinghamshire, said:

Details

Education + Training, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0040-0912

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Article
Publication date: 8 April 2019

Yasuhiro Kotera and William Van Gordon

Though several work-related mental health training initiatives have been implemented in Japan, the effectiveness of such approaches remains unclear. Consequently, some…

Abstract

Purpose

Though several work-related mental health training initiatives have been implemented in Japan, the effectiveness of such approaches remains unclear. Consequently, some Japanese corporations prefer using interventions such as neuro-linguistic programming (NLP) to improve employee mental health and wellbeing. This language-based development methodology has been the subject of debate in terms of the quality of the underlying empirical evidence. However, a perspective missing from this debate is an evidence-based understanding of the first-hand experiences of employees that have undertaken NLP training. The purpose of this paper is to inform this debate by conducting a rigorous qualitative examination of the experiences of Japanese senior managers who had recently received training in NLP.

Design/methodology/approach

Semi-structured interviews attended by 11 Japanese NLP master practitioners were analysed using thematic analysis.

Findings

Four themes emerged from the data set: improving work-related mental health, NLP fosters a better understanding of the mind, NLP helps to reframe perspectives relating to work and mental health, and challenges of NLP training.

Originality/value

While managers found NLP training skills such as reframing and neuro-logical levels useful to their managerial practice and mental health more generally, they raised concerns about NLP’s reputation as well as the utility of some of the techniques employed in NLP.

Details

The Journal of Mental Health Training, Education and Practice, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1755-6228

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Kybernetes, vol. 41 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0368-492X

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1996

Ashley Dowlen

Identifies aspects of neurolinguistic programming (NLP) that may be of use in management learning. Uses three approaches to explore NLP; an introductory programme, a…

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3619

Abstract

Identifies aspects of neurolinguistic programming (NLP) that may be of use in management learning. Uses three approaches to explore NLP; an introductory programme, a profiling questionnaire and an analysis of a sample of management development articles. Then reviews research evidence on NLP. Concludes that NLP techniques using language patterns and questioning techniques appear to be of use; existing research evidence is limited and inconclusive; NLP is enthusiastically supported by those who practise it, and that is both its strength and potential weakness.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 1 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Harry Alder

Questions whether the search for excellence should begin in thecorporation or in the world of the individual, on which neuro‐linguisticprogramming (NLP) is based. Examines…

Abstract

Questions whether the search for excellence should begin in the corporation or in the world of the individual, on which neuro‐linguistic programming (NLP) is based. Examines the individual holistically – “we are what we think”, modelled on internal as well as external states, and explores how to incorporate the associated personal effectiveness techniques with orthodox training and development programmes. Looks at the aspects of self‐modelling and the whole brain, both left and right, and concludes that a new cognitive approach to management science is necessary for the 1990s.

Details

Management Decision, vol. 30 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0025-1747

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Article
Publication date: 11 May 2010

Paul Tosey and Jane Mathison

The purpose of this paper is to explore a contemporary European development in research into first person accounts of experience, called psychophenomenology, that offers…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore a contemporary European development in research into first person accounts of experience, called psychophenomenology, that offers enhancements to phenomenological interviewing. It is a form of guided introspection that seeks to develop finely grained first‐person accounts by using distinctions in language, internal sensory representations and imagery that have been incorporated from neuro‐linguistic programming (NLP). It is also a participative, relational and developmental form of interviewing, in the sense that the interviewee can gain significant insight into their experience; the process is not concerned purely with data gathering.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors review the theoretical assumptions on which psychophenomenology is based, then describe the principal method used in psychophenomenology, the “explicitation interview”. The interview protocol is illustrated with transcript data, through which they identify specific aspects of NLP that have been incorporated into psychophenomenology.

Findings

Psychophenomenology offers refinements to the precision of phenomenological methods found in organizational research, such as interpretative phenomenological analysis.

Research limitations/implications

The epistemological claims and implications of psychophenomenology are reviewed.

Practical implications

These developments may provide a basis for reconsidering the research value of introspection, which has often been dismissed as non‐rigorous.

Originality/value

The paper introduces psychophenomenology to the field of organizational research. It also describes how psychophenomenology has innovated by drawing from NLP, an approach to personal development that is found in organizational practices such as executive coaching, in order to enhance the precision and rigour of both interviews and transcript analysis.

Details

Qualitative Research in Organizations and Management: An International Journal, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1746-5648

Keywords

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