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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1983

Michael White

For many years, the achievements of Japanese industry were regarded in Britain as remarkable, enviable perhaps, but essentially irrelevant. The arguments always put…

Abstract

For many years, the achievements of Japanese industry were regarded in Britain as remarkable, enviable perhaps, but essentially irrelevant. The arguments always put forward by British managers to dismiss the possibility of learning from Japan were that Japanese workers, Japanese industrial relations, and many features of Japanese social life, were fundamentally different from British, and were essential to the success of Japanese manufacturing methods. With the arrival of Japanese manufacturing subsidiaries in Britain, many of which appear to be flourishing, those arguments have become weaker and British management has begun to look at the Japanese management approach with a more appreciative and acquisitive eye.

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International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 3 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Yui Kimura and Masaru Yoshimori

A description is given of the MBA programme which began in 1988 atthe International University of Japan (IUJ) in conjunction with anAmerican business school. A discussion…

Abstract

A description is given of the MBA programme which began in 1988 at the International University of Japan (IUJ) in conjunction with an American business school. A discussion of the traditional Japanese management development methods is given and differences from the Western approach are noted. In the 1980s, the global expansion of Japanese firms and the growing consumer demand for foreign goods and services prompted a review of the various management skills required and the methods of management development. The MBA programme at the IUJ aims to combine the best of both Japanese and Western methods and hopes to promote more effective communication between Japanese companies and their foreign counterparts.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 October 1996

Andrew Kakabadse, Andrew Myers and Lola Okazaki‐Ward

Japan’s advance into Europe over the last ten years or so has been well documented. Through localization, gaining a competitive advantage has been the strategic response…

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1040

Abstract

Japan’s advance into Europe over the last ten years or so has been well documented. Through localization, gaining a competitive advantage has been the strategic response of Japanese organizations towards Europeanization. Reports on a survey of some 3,350 executives operating within Europe and Japan. Elicits three types of Japanese management style and describes these as: the policy makers; the business drivers; and the implementors. Analyses and compares with the European responses, the responses from these three groups. Discusses the implications of these management styles for international management. Also considers training and development implications for Japanese secondees which centre on: effective communication; developing quality relationships; problem solving at local level; and preparation for the selected secondee.

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Journal of European Industrial Training, vol. 20 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0590

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1997

Leanne Fiftal Alarid and Hsiao‐Ming Wang

Notes that the practice of Japanese management contributed to Japan’s renovation from the ashes of the Second World War to become one of the world’s economic leaders, and…

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4337

Abstract

Notes that the practice of Japanese management contributed to Japan’s renovation from the ashes of the Second World War to become one of the world’s economic leaders, and at the same time, expand the proficiency of Japanese police administration. Identifies, through Ouchi’s Management Theory Z, three commonalties to Japanese police operations and the practices of Japanese corporations: groupism, seniority, and non‐specialized career paths. Concludes with a discussion on implementing Japanese management and policing with American community‐oriented policing.

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Policing: An International Journal of Police Strategies & Management, vol. 20 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1363-951X

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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1989

Larry Crump

Key concepts influencing Japanese business practices are examined.These include amae, hitonami, haji, and ringi. The majorcross‐cultural training and development issues…

Abstract

Key concepts influencing Japanese business practices are examined. These include amae, hitonami, haji, and ringi. The major cross‐cultural training and development issues are discussed and problem areas highlighted where there can be vast differences in the approach of a Japanese manager from that of a Western manager in the same situation. Problem areas and training needs are identified, particularly in communication skills, so that Japanese managers can be better equipped for dealing with Western‐based organisations.

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Journal of Management Development, vol. 8 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1992

Greg J. Bamber, Mark A. Shadur and Faith Howell

Discusses feasibility, desirability and value of Japanesemanagement strategies in a Western context. Major Japanese companies areat the leading edge in refining management

Abstract

Discusses feasibility, desirability and value of Japanese management strategies in a Western context. Major Japanese companies are at the leading edge in refining management strategies, techniques and styles, for example, with regard to having a long‐term perspective and the continuous improvement of quality, stock control, skill formation, communications, training and employee development. As possible models can these approaches be transferred to different cultures?

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Employee Relations, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0142-5455

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Article
Publication date: 1 June 1991

Abbass F. Alkhafaji

The study of international business has become increasinglyimportant in recent years. So important that the American Assembly ofthe Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB…

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3335

Abstract

The study of international business has become increasingly important in recent years. So important that the American Assembly of the Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) has called for the internationalisation of business curricula. In 1992 and beyond, successful business people will treat the entire world as their domain. No one country can operate in an economic vacuum. Any economic measures taken by one country can affect the global economy. This book is designed to challenge the reader to develop a global perspective of international business. Globalisation is by no means a new concept, but there are many new factors that have contributed to its recently accelerated growth. Among them, the new technologies in communication and transport that have resulted in major expansions of international trade and investment. In the future, the world market will become predominant. There are bound to be big changes in the world economy. For instance the changes in Eastern Europe and the European Community during the 1990s. With a strong knowledge base in international business, future managers will be better prepared for the new world market. This book introduces its readers to the exciting and rewarding field of international management and international corporations. It is written in contemporary, easy‐to‐understand language, avoiding abstract terminology; and is organised into five sections, each of which includes a number of chapters that cover a subject involving activities that cross national boundaries.

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Article
Publication date: 30 July 2008

Yeap Peik Foong and Stanley Richardson

The aim of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of Malaysian employees of ABC MSC (a Japanese company in Malaysia) in order to recommend changes in management practices.

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5097

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to investigate the perceptions of Malaysian employees of ABC MSC (a Japanese company in Malaysia) in order to recommend changes in management practices.

Design/methodology/approach

Fieldwork was conducted using participant observation and interviews. Participant observation was conducted to investigate the flow of information, the implementation of decisions made by the top Japanese managers, problem resolution, and the reaction of the local staff to management practices. The interviews highlighted communication problems which have existed between the Japanese CEO and the local telecommunications companies since the company started operations in 1997.

Findings

Even thought the company is backed by a financially strong parent company in Japan and has a lot of growth potential, this potential remains partially untapped due to management strategies of the company headquarters.

Research limitations/implications

Japan remains an important Foreign Direct Investment country in Malaysia. The perceptions of employees of Japanese companies in Malaysia are worth investigating since changes of management strategies in the home country affect the direction and operations of the overseas subsidiaries. Further research should be carried out in other Japanese companies in Malaysia.

Practical implications

Suggestions to improve the management strategies are discussed.

Originality/value

It is believed that no other Japanese company in Malaysia has been investigated in this way before. This paper's findings should be useful to many expatriate managers in Malaysia.

Details

Cross Cultural Management: An International Journal, vol. 15 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-7606

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Article
Publication date: 1 July 1994

Zhong‐Ming Wang and Takao Satow

HRM and decision‐making patterns can affect the overall effectiveness ofjoint ventures. Discusses the results of case studies ofChinese‐Japanese and wholly Japanese

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1959

Abstract

HRM and decision‐making patterns can affect the overall effectiveness of joint ventures. Discusses the results of case studies of Chinese‐Japanese and wholly Japanese ventures in China. Proposes that the Japanese managerial strategies may be more suited to building the new management norms in the initial phases of the joint venture while the Chinese managerial style ensures continued progress, within the Chinese cultural context, in the more advanced stages of the joint venture.

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 2001

Vagelis Dedoussis

Changes are under way in Japan’s distinctive human resources management practices as the state of the economy remains fragile following the country’s prolonged recession…

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4003

Abstract

Changes are under way in Japan’s distinctive human resources management practices as the state of the economy remains fragile following the country’s prolonged recession. However, such changes may not necessarily point to the eventual collapse of the Japanese employment system, as sometimes suggested. Despite the adjustments companies have made to cope with the economic downturn, distinctive human resources management practices in Japan’s large‐scale enterprises are unlikely to disappear altogether. This paper argues that the relationship between large‐scale enterprises and an even smaller segment of the permanent workforce will continue to be defined by distinctive management practices. Thus, what is actually taking place in Japanese management is an ad hoc reshuffle rather than substantial restructuring of internal labor markets.

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Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 16 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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