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Article
Publication date: 21 September 2021

Angela Towers and Neil Towers

This paper aims to define and frame the understanding of customer journeys, associated areas of consumer decision-making process stages and touch point categories based on an…

6291

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to define and frame the understanding of customer journeys, associated areas of consumer decision-making process stages and touch point categories based on an ownership perspective.

Design/methodology/approach

The research is based on a detailed literature review of customer journeys, in peer-reviewed marketing and retail journals, within the last decade. The Chartered Association of Business Schools (ABS) academic journal guide marketing discipline list was used because it only includes peer-reviewed journals, based on an internationally accepted quality ranked list.

Findings

The detailed analysis of the journals identified three groups of touch points (brand owned, partner owned/managed and outside the control of brand owner/partner) and three decision-making process stages (pre-purchase, purchase and post–purchase) that informed a clearer definition and understanding of the customer journey.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations concern the ABS database was used and a ten-year date period was selected, which may exclude some relevant journal articles, particularly those written in a language other than English.

Originality/value

The authors have provided a revised definition of customer journey, clarified the decision-making stages and subsequent categorisation of touch points from an ownership perspective.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 50 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 17 February 2021

Loay Salhieh, Mohammad Shehadeh, Ismail Abushaikha and Neil Towers

The purpose of this paper is to assess the benefits of integrating IT tracking and routing systems into last-mile distribution operations. The paper also demonstrates the role of…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess the benefits of integrating IT tracking and routing systems into last-mile distribution operations. The paper also demonstrates the role of field experiments as a valid approach for improving the rigour of logistics research.

Design/methodology/approach

The study employs a field experiment approach. Data were collected before and after the experimental treatment from 16 participating vehicles, which were used as inputs and outputs to calculate vehicles' efficiencies using data envelopment analysis.

Findings

Through employing manipulation and random assignment to investigate causality in naturally occurring contexts, the study results show statistical evidence for the role of vehicle tracking and routing systems in enhancing fleet efficiency. Furthermore, results show that field experiment is an appropriate method for capital budgeting of deploying IT systems in the distribution function.

Practical implications

Distribution managers can use a field experiment setup to assess the potential impact of installing IT solutions prior to large-scale implementation or prior to purchasing.

Originality/value

The study fills a gap in the literature through the application of a field experiment approach to establish causality relationships in distribution and logistics research. This study should encourage new research on the role of field experimentation in evaluating the benefits gained from, and the capital budgeting of, the modern disruptive technologies in supply chains.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 49 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 March 2020

Neil Towers, Ismail Abushaikha, James Ritchie and Andreas Holter

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the non-academic impact in supply chain management (SCM) research through the application of three distinctive approaches to…

1322

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to demonstrate the non-academic impact in supply chain management (SCM) research through the application of three distinctive approaches to phenomenological methodology in different contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

Evidence-based examples from three case studies using interpretivist, social constructivist and critical realist methodologies are presented. They reflect non-positivist approaches commonly used in phenomenological methodology and adopted in SCM investigative research.

Findings

Different types of non-academic reach and significance from each research methodology are discussed to illustrate the non-academic impact benefits from each case. The three distinctive phenomenological approaches have been shown to contribute to innovative research methodology development on their own philosophical merit and produced novel contributions to SCM research in particular.

Research limitations/implications

The non-academic impact examples have been shown to have wider influence and implication to business, the economy and society at large.

Originality/value

The paper highlights the relevance of phenomenological research methodology for SCM. It also contributes to the development of the SCM subject area and is hoped to encourage further reporting of non-academic impact of supply chain research.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 8 August 2016

Neil Towers

478

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Content available
Article
Publication date: 9 January 2017

Neil Towers

362

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 June 2017

Neil Towers

297

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Content available
Article
Publication date: 12 September 2016

Neil Towers

354

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 44 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Professor Neil Towers

446

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 45 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Article
Publication date: 31 October 2023

Luay Jum'a, Ismail Abushaikha, Neil Towers and Wasan Al-Masa'fah

The purpose of this paper is to identify the themes that emerged from retail supply chain (RSC) literature during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that inform…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify the themes that emerged from retail supply chain (RSC) literature during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic that inform future mitigation and recovery strategies.

Design/methodology/approach

This study analyses contributions in the RSC literature using four databases: Emerald, Elsevier (Science Direct), Wiley and Taylor & Francis. The systematic review approach resulted in identifying 74 articles covering 2020 to 2022.

Findings

Four themes emerged from the RSC literature on COVID-19. The first theme highlighted the factors that exacerbated the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic on the RSC. The second theme focussed on the types of disruptions that occurred in the RSC during the pandemic. The third theme demonstrated the recovery strategies used to reduce the impact of COVID-19 on the RSC. The fourth theme identified proposed mitigation strategies for the RSC post-COVID-19 outbreak.

Practical implications

The study provides a deeper understanding of how RSC managers could successfully reduce the effects of the COVID-19 pandemic by dealing with interruptions. Based on the reviewed studies and the four themes that evolved from RSC literature on COVID-19 throughout 2020–2022, 11 key RSC strategies and lessons have been recommended to decision-makers in the retail industry.

Originality/value

This is the first study to identify the themes that emerged from RSC literature during the COVID-19 pandemic to inform future mitigation and recovery strategies. The resulting themes add to the existing body of knowledge and establish the need for further research into other sectors that might be affected by future pandemics.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 52 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 June 2020

Neil Towers, Adhi Setyo Santoso, Nadine Sulkowski and John Jameson

The aim of this paper is to conceptualise entrepreneurial capacity-building as an integrated approach within the international higher education sector. Whilst…

Abstract

Purpose

The aim of this paper is to conceptualise entrepreneurial capacity-building as an integrated approach within the international higher education sector. Whilst university–enterprise collaboration is recognised as being essential to promoting graduate employability and entrepreneurship, the lack of an integrated approach towards embedding entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial capacity-building with an entrepreneurial skill and mind-set prevails in the higher education sector. With reference to the retail sector, increasingly competitive job markets and the need for entrepreneurial capacity-building place growing pressures on universities to nurture career-ready graduates with entrepreneurial acumen.

Design/methodology/approach

The theoretical paper presents a rationale for embedding entrepreneurship education into university curricula and for promoting university–business collaboration. Secondly, it reviews the extent to which entrepreneurial capacity-building is institutionally embedded to foster graduate entrepreneurship, university–business collaboration and business incubation within one strategic framework. Finally, the paper proposes five propositions within a tripartite approach that can foster graduate entrepreneurs with entrepreneurial skills and mind-set, useful for existing enterprises and start-ups. The implications for these propositions are discussed.

Findings

The authors propose five propositions with a tripartite approach that can foster graduate entrepreneurs with entrepreneurial skill and mind-set, skills for creating enterprises and university–enterprise collaboration within one strategic framework.

Practical implications

Increasingly competitive job markets and the need for entrepreneurial capacity-building place growing pressures on universities to nurture career-ready graduates with entrepreneurial acumen in social science (e.g. retail, business management and accountancy) and science (e.g. pharmacy, architecture and engineering) programmes centred within the tripartite approach.

Originality/value

Whilst university–enterprise collaboration is recognised as being essential to promoting graduate employability and entrepreneurship, the tripartite integrated approach embeds entrepreneurship education and entrepreneurial capacity-building with an entrepreneurial skillset and mind-set in the international higher education sector.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 48 no. 8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

1 – 10 of 335