Search results

1 – 10 of over 12000
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 December 1989

Lisa M. Ellram, Bernard J. La Londe and Mary Margaret Weber

The results from a survey of top retailing executives regardingcurrent logistics practices and trends are described. The focus is oncustomer service factors, the use of a…

Downloads
1924

Abstract

The results from a survey of top retailing executives regarding current logistics practices and trends are described. The focus is on customer service factors, the use of a supply chain management approach in retailing channels, and the impact of information technology on retail logistics today and in the future. Information technologies discussed include electronic data interchange, point of sale and barcoding. The article concludes that based on the importance that retailers attach to customer service, supply chain management and information technology, the 1990s will likely be an exciting and challenging time in the management of the retail logistics function.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Materials Management, vol. 19 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0269-8218

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 29 July 2014

Michael G. Sternbeck and Heinrich Kuhn

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe similarities between logistics structures and mid-term planning problems in the grocery retail and automotive…

Downloads
2160

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and describe similarities between logistics structures and mid-term planning problems in the grocery retail and automotive industries in a specific internal section of their respective supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

The benchmarking approach is used as a framework for this paper. It is based on insights resulting from several joint projects with grocery retailers and automobile producers. A particular focus of the research was participating in an exchange of ideas and experience between logistics managers in both industry sectors.

Findings

The authors have identified parallels when comparing the internal retail supply chain of the grocery retail industry, which consists of distribution centres, transportation and in-store logistics, with the internal logistics network in the automotive industry, which consists of logistics supermarkets, transportation and work zone operations at the assembly line. Strong similarities have been found for three planning problems related to tactical planning tasks: assigning products and parts to delivery modes, selecting packaging units and loading carriers, and determining delivery cycles. In comparison to retailing, there is a clearer trend in the automotive industry to plan line-back and align processes with the operator's requirements at the assembly line.

Practical implications

For logisticians in grocery retailing and the automotive industry, this paper provides relevant input for functional benchmarking initiatives and offers an inspirational view beyond the horizon.

Originality/value

This paper is the first to focus on similarities in logistics network structures and planning tasks between the two industries from the viewpoint of grocery retailing.

Details

Benchmarking: An International Journal, vol. 21 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1463-5771

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2001

Michael A. Bourlakis and Constantine A. Bourlakis

According to the “classical” school of thought , the implementation of a firm’s strategy can be the result of a deliberate and rational process, or alternatively an…

Downloads
7566

Abstract

According to the “classical” school of thought , the implementation of a firm’s strategy can be the result of a deliberate and rational process, or alternatively an emergent and non‐intentional one. The rising importance of logistics in retail strategy, and, in particular, the impact of centralisation of logistical activities upon the development of a retail logistics strategy, necessitates an in‐depth examination of the relevant company actions. This paper identifies which strategic approach is followed by domestic and multinational firms that operate in the Greek food multiple retail sector. The findings point out the major importance of warehousing in multinational firms’ logistics operations and the vital role of logistics in multinational retailers’ strategy. Multinational firms follow a deliberate logistics strategy that leads to increased logistics efficiency when compared to domestic firms that follow the emergent logistics strategy.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2005

Constantine Bourlakis and Michael Bourlakis

To investigate the evolutionary process of the retail logistics network formation, and to propose a relationship framework between the logistics asset buyer (the retailer…

Downloads
5684

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the evolutionary process of the retail logistics network formation, and to propose a relationship framework between the logistics asset buyer (the retailer) and the logistics asset supplier (the third‐party logistics firm).

Design/methodology/approach

The evolutionary process is based on the way the asset specificity element of transaction costs theory can be perceived by the logistics asset buyer and the logistics asset supplier. The asset specificity element is linked to both network and buyer‐supplier relationship theories with the aim of conceptualising a buyer‐supplier relationship framework. Secondary data for the UK food retail chain are also employed.

Findings

A new relationship framework is developed based on the buyers’‐suppliers’ perceptions in relation to logistics asset specificity, and the conditions required for the formation of the retail logistics network are illustrated. If transaction costs are perceived as high by both the buyer and the supplier of a logistics asset, the retailer will engage into a fourth‐party logistics network formation where the use of information technology systems is of critical importance. At this stage, these systems will become the primary co‐ordination device for the reduction and absorption of complexity in the retail chain.

Originality/value

The paper offers a unique buyer‐supplier partnership framework by proposing that the formation of a fourth‐party logistics network will decrease the complexity of modern retail logistics operations. The paper will assist retail managers responsible for the development of logistics strategies and will be beneficial to researchers examining logistics and supply chain management operations.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2018

Marco Melacini, Sara Perotti, Monica Rasini and Elena Tappia

Given the progressive growth of e-commerce sales and the rising interest in omni-channel (OC) retailing amongst academics and practitioners, the purpose of this paper is…

Downloads
5478

Abstract

Purpose

Given the progressive growth of e-commerce sales and the rising interest in omni-channel (OC) retailing amongst academics and practitioners, the purpose of this paper is to provide an up-to-date literature review on the logistics involved when moving towards OC retailing. Specifically, we have examined the main issues relating to e-fulfilment and distribution, highlighting how the topic has been developed over time, and identifying the most promising research streams for the near future.

Design/methodology/approach

A systematic literature review methodology is adopted. The review is based on 58 papers published from 2002 to 2017 in 34 international journals. The papers were analysed and categorised according to their defining characteristics, methodologies adopted and themes addressed.

Findings

This paper provides an overview of the main issues relating to e-fulfilment and distribution experienced by companies shifting towards OC, mapped along three dimensions: distribution network design, inventory and capacity management, delivery planning and execution. Despite the growing interest in OC retailing, many key topics are still under-represented, including the evolution of retail distribution networks, assortment planning over multiple channels, the logistics role played by stores in the delivery process and the interplay between different logistics aspects.

Originality/value

The paper offers insights into the main logistics issues in MC and OC retailing, as well as highlights potential fields for further investigation. From a managerial perspective, this paper is useful for retailers adopting an OC approach to guide their future efforts concerning their business logistics model.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Book part
Publication date: 4 December 2014

Maria Björklund and Helena Forslund

This study aims to illustrate how retail chains with a green image align sustainable logistics actions, logistics measurements and contracts with logistics service…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to illustrate how retail chains with a green image align sustainable logistics actions, logistics measurements and contracts with logistics service providers (LSPs), and to develop a classification model that allows for a description of the various shades of green within companies.

Design/methodology/approach

We carried out a multiple case study of four retail chains with a green image operating in the Swedish market, collecting empirical data from the retail chains’ sustainability reports and home pages and conducting interviews with logistics, transportation and supply chain managers.

Findings

Based on the literature, we developed a classification model for judging green image, green logistics actions, green measurements and green contracts. The model is used to illustrate the different shades of green found within the respective retail chains. A green image seems well-aligned with green logistics actions. However, there are more levels to judge, and the measurement systems are not sufficiently developed to track green logistics actions. Contract handling is more developed among retail chains than measurements, which is positive, as this is a way of ensuring that LSPs are involved. In our classification model, greenwashing can be judged in a more nuanced way, delving deeper under the surface.

Research limitations/implications

The provided classification model adds to our knowledge and illustrates the alignment within companies’ sustainable logistics. The robustness of the model can be strengthened by applying it to a larger number of cases and by continually validating its content and evaluation criteria.

Practical implications

The study’s main practical contribution is the classification model, which may potentially serve as a method for managers to easily judge the green alignment of a retail chain’s logistics.

Originality/value

Few empirical studies capture how retail chains measure environmental logistics performance, and even fewer concern contracts stipulating the environmental demands placed on LSPs.

Details

Sustainable Logistics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78441-062-9

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 4 March 2014

Helena Forslund

The first purpose of this study is to explore logistics performance management practices and lessons learned in some supplier/retailer dyads across retail industries. A…

Downloads
1950

Abstract

Purpose

The first purpose of this study is to explore logistics performance management practices and lessons learned in some supplier/retailer dyads across retail industries. A second purpose is to suggest a continued research agenda for logistics performance management across retail industries.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies are conducted in four supplier/retailer dyads in different retailing industries in Sweden. The analysis is of a cross-case character and uses a pattern matching approach.

Findings

Large differences in practices within and between dyads are found. Some problems were indicated: lack of trust; difficulties in developing a collaborative culture; difficulties in relating metrics to customer value and lacking IT support. A previously unknown obstacle, the internal collaboration with category management, was identified. A good example was found in an industry standard. State-of-the-art descriptions, international comparisons, exploring the interface with the stores and combating identified problems were found to be relevant topics for continued research.

Research limitations/implications

The limitations are mainly related to the small number of cases, but since the purpose of this study is exploratory, this should be acceptable. The theoretical contribution is a first step in the expansion of knowledge on logistics performance management from manufacturing to retailing companies.

Practical implications

The practical contribution includes insights in the shape of descriptions and lessons learned in different retail industries.

Originality/value

No identified study has explored logistics performance management as a whole across retail industries with a dyadic approach.

Details

International Journal of Retail & Distribution Management, vol. 42 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-0552

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 7 February 2019

Heleen Buldeo Rai, Sara Verlinde, Cathy Macharis, Penelope Schoutteet and Lieselot Vanhaverbeke

The purpose of this paper is to identify in what way logistics service providers are involved in the logistics operations of omnichannel retailers. Given the importance of…

Downloads
2854

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify in what way logistics service providers are involved in the logistics operations of omnichannel retailers. Given the importance of logistics in omnichannel retail and the complexities that it brings forth, it is unclear if the current tendency towards logistics outsourcing continues, and how logistics service providers should adapt to remain relevant in the omnichannel retail environment.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on both desk and field research. The authors analysed the scientific information available on omnichannel retail logistics and conducted semi-structured expert interviews with food and non-food retailers that adopt an omnichannel model.

Findings

The research demonstrates distinct differences between food and non-food retailers. While food retailers are inclined to organise fulfilment and last mile activities in-house, non-food retailers partner closely with logistics service providers. Nonetheless, the store network of non-food retailers is attracting a growing part of logistics activities, which retailers are building themselves. To sustain their relevance in the omnichannel environment and strengthen their position for the future, the authors created a competency recommendation framework for logistics service providers, in which service differentiation is proposed as a viable direction for growth.

Research limitations/implications

The research is based on insights from retailers based in the Brussels-Capital Region (Belgium) and requires further and wider testing in other contexts and geographical areas.

Practical implications

The findings have strategic importance for retailers that are developing an omnichannel retail model and logistics service providers that (aim to) serve clients and operate activities within the retail sector.

Originality/value

The research provides a holistic view of logistics in omnichannel retail by identifying insourcing and outsourcing mechanisms and developing competency recommendations to fulfilment, internal transport and last mile transport in omnichannel retail.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 49 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 19 April 2013

Olfa Bouzaabia, Allard C.R. van Riel and Janjaap Semeijn

Traditional retailers still insist on using price, product, and promotion as sources of competitive advantage. This emphasis typically ignores the potential of in‐store…

Downloads
3935

Abstract

Purpose

Traditional retailers still insist on using price, product, and promotion as sources of competitive advantage. This emphasis typically ignores the potential of in‐store logistics operations in the creation of customer value. A major objective of retail customers is to navigate the retail servicescape in an efficient, convenient, enjoyable and effective manner. In‐store logistics operations largely determine how and to what extent the customer may achieve this objective. However, customer‐perceived indicators of in‐store logistics performance, such as product returns, order information, opening hours, and product availability and accessibility, have been largely ignored in research on retail service. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the role of in‐store logistics in determining customer outcomes such as store image, satisfaction and loyalty intentions.

Design/methodology/approach

A model is developed based on extant research in the areas of logistics service quality, service logic, store image, and customer loyalty. To test the plausibility of the model, 200 supermarket customers were surveyed in an exploratory field study. Data were analyzed by means of structural equation modeling in SmartPLS.

Findings

Results show that customers may derive a substantial share of their satisfaction from interactions with in‐store logistics operations. Customer‐perceived performance of these operations – an important element of the retail servicescape – influences customer satisfaction directly, but also through its influence on store image.

Research limitations/implications

In‐store logistics dimensions were identified based on exploratory research. A more structured, theory‐driven approach, might yield further insight. Explained variance levels in the outcome variables point at unobserved influences. Future research into the drivers of retail experience satisfaction could further complete the picture.

Originality/value

From a customer perspective, the paper investigates in‐store logistics performance and its effects on customer outcomes in a field study.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 24 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 22 January 2018

Johannes Wollenburg, Alexander Hübner, Heinrich Kuhn and Alexander Trautrims

The advent of grocery sales through online channels necessitates that bricks-and-mortar retailers redefine their logistics networks if they want to compete online. Because…

Downloads
7541

Abstract

Purpose

The advent of grocery sales through online channels necessitates that bricks-and-mortar retailers redefine their logistics networks if they want to compete online. Because the general understanding of such bricks-and-clicks logistics systems for grocery is still limited, the purpose of this paper is to analyze the internal logistics networks used to serve customers across channels by means of an exploratory study with retailers from different contexts.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 12 case companies from six European countries participated in this exploratory study. Face-to-face interviews with managers were the primary source for data collection. The heterogeneity of the sample enabled the authors to build a typology of logistics networks in grocery retailing on multiple channels and to understand the advantages of different warehousing, picking, internal transportation and last-mile delivery systems.

Findings

Bricks-and-mortar grocery retailers are leveraging their existing logistics structures to fulfill online orders. Logistics networks are mostly determined by the question of where to split case packs into customer units. In non-food logistics, channel integration is mostly seen as beneficial, but in grocery retailing, this depends heavily on product, market and retailer specifics. The data from the heterogeneous sample reveal six distinct types for cross-channel order fulfillment.

Practical implications

The qualitative analysis of different design options can serve as a decision support for retailers developing logistics networks to serve customers across channels.

Originality/value

The paper shows the internal and external factors that drive the decision-making for omni-channel (OC) logistics networks for previously store-based grocery retailers. Thereby, it makes a step toward building a contingency and configuration theory of retail networks design. It discusses in particular the differences between grocery and non-food OC retailing, last-mile delivery systems and market characteristics in the decision-making of retail networks design.

Details

International Journal of Physical Distribution & Logistics Management, vol. 48 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0960-0035

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 12000