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Open Access
Article
Publication date: 1 July 2022

Ioanna Falagara Sigala, Mikhail Sirenko, Tina Comes and Gyöngyi Kovács

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has emerged as an unprecedented health crisis worldwide and heavily disrupted the healthcare supply chain. This study focuses…

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Abstract

Purpose

The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has emerged as an unprecedented health crisis worldwide and heavily disrupted the healthcare supply chain. This study focuses on analysing the different types of disruptions occurring in personal protective equipment (PPE) supply chains during the COVID-19 pandemic and on proposing mitigation strategies that are fit to the global scale and many interdependencies that are characteristic for this pandemic. The authors construct a conceptual system dynamics model (SD) based on the literature and adjusted with the use of empirical data (interviews) to capture the complexity of a global supply chain and identify leverage points (mitigation strategies).

Design/methodology/approach

This research follows a mix-methods approach. First, the authors developed a conceptual framework based on four types of disruptions that usually occur during health emergencies (direct effect, policy, supply chain strategy, and behaviourally induced disruptions). Second, the authors collected and analysed data from interviews with experts in the PPE supply chain. Based on the interviews data, the authors developed a conceptual system dynamics (SD) model that allows to capture the complex and dynamic interplay between the elements of the global supply chain system, by highlighting key feedback loops, delays, and the way the mitigation strategies can impact on them. From this analysis, the authors developed four propositions for supply chain risk management (SCRM) in global health emergencies and four recommendations for the policy and decision makers.

Findings

The SD model highlights that without a combination of mitigation measures, it is impossible to overcome all disruptions. As such, a co-ordinated effort across the different countries and sectors that experience the disruptions is needed. The SD model also shows that there are important feedback loops, by which initial disruptions create delays and shortages that propagate through the supply chain network. If the co-ordinated mitigation measures are not implemented early at the onset of the pandemic, these disruptions will be persistent, creating potential shortages of PPE and other critical equipment at the onset of a pandemic – when they are most urgently needed.

Originality/value

This research enriches the understanding of the disruptions of PPE supply chains on the systems level and proposes mitigation strategies based on empirical data and the existing literature.

Article
Publication date: 18 May 2022

Yuxiao Ye, Mohammed Ali Suleiman and Baofeng Huo

The relationship between just-in-time (JIT) and supply chain disruption risk is unclear from the existing literature. This paper aims to investigate the impact of supplier…

Abstract

Purpose

The relationship between just-in-time (JIT) and supply chain disruption risk is unclear from the existing literature. This paper aims to investigate the impact of supplier JIT and customer JIT on supplier disruption risk (SDR), internal disruption risk (IDR), and customer disruption risk (CDR) and explore the moderating role of supply chain centralization.

Design/methodology/approach

Based on survey data collected from 213 manufacturing firms in China, this study employs structural equation modeling with SmartPLS 3.0 to test the main proposed model and applies an ordinary least square regression to test the moderating effect.

Findings

The results demonstrate that supplier JIT is positively related to SDR and negatively associated with IDR. Customer JIT is positively associated with CDR but has no significant effect on IDR. The results also show that SDR and CDR lead to IDR and mediate the relationship between supplier JIT, customer JIT, and IDR. In addition, supply chain centralization amplifies the positive impacts of supply chain JIT on SDR and IDR.

Originality/value

This study makes two main contributions. First, the study provides a comprehensive analysis of the relationship between supply chain JIT and disruption risk. Second, the study addresses that implementing JIT in a supply chain with a centralized decision-making structure leads to a higher level of disruption risk.

Details

Industrial Management & Data Systems, vol. 122 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-5577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 12 April 2022

Gyan Prakash

This paper identifies sources of disruptions that impede resilience in the dairy supply chain in an emerging economy context.

Abstract

Purpose

This paper identifies sources of disruptions that impede resilience in the dairy supply chain in an emerging economy context.

Design/methodology/approach

A case study approach is used. The unit of analysis is the Indian dairy supply chain (IDSC). Data were collected from nine major dairy cooperatives and five major private firms operating across the Indian states. A total of 28 face-to-face semi-structured interviews were conducted with two individuals from each case dairy organisation during January 2016 to December 2017.

Findings

Disruption sources in the IDSC are both external and internal and impact the quality of products and the distribution network. Compared to developed economies, in an emerging economy context such as India, the number of disruptions is very high. These disruptions negatively impact resilience and affect efficiency, flexibility, responsiveness and product quality.

Research limitations/implications

The findings stress the importance of integration across upstream and downstream processes in the IDSC. However, contextual factors should also be considered when designing the supply chain configuration. Small supply sources may be conceptualised as distributed sources that can be consolidated on the move using logistics and IT-enabled solutions. Moreover, the underlying processes of the dairy supply chain need to adapt to the external environment, and internal causes of disruptions should be eliminated through process redesign.

Practical implications

The findings highlight that the efficient operation of the IDSC is challenged by disruptions, the fragmentation of various stages and poor support infrastructure. The findings may be useful in managing supply networks which have linkages in emerging economies.

Social implications

The upstream stage of the IDSC involves many small- and medium-sized unorganised producers. The overall inefficiency and poor value generation across the entire IDSC constrain the livelihood and interests of these unorganised producers. Therefore, supply chain design needs to be aligned with social context.

Originality/value

The central contribution of this article is to present sources of disruptions that impact dairy supply chain performance in an emerging economy context. Areas requiring process improvement are also highlighted.

Details

Journal of Advances in Management Research, vol. 19 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0972-7981

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 24 January 2022

Cheyne M. Wooderson

This study assesses disruption risk management and resilience capabilities from the perspective of top-level operations and supply chain managers when faced with COVID-19…

Abstract

Purpose

This study assesses disruption risk management and resilience capabilities from the perspective of top-level operations and supply chain managers when faced with COVID-19 disruptions.

Design/methodology/approach

The study involves qualitative research via a triple-phase, interview-based method, following an interpretivist philosophy embodying an empathetic, subjective view to interpret the perspective of top-level managers. The data has been coded and analysed thematically.

Findings

Based on the ability to adapt to changing and uncertain environments using quick decision-making, technology and access to resources, the findings show a level of resilience adequate to withstand risk disruptions. The data do not expose differences between disruption management and traditional risk management but do display potential for businesses to adopt a disruption-oriented supply network that is flexible.

Research limitations/implications

Currently, there are little data concerning COVID-19 disruption risk, and the propagation of these impacts throughout the supply chain. This study is limited to the perspective of top, senior-level managers in supply chain and operations.

Practical implications

The research signifies that by adopting a disruption-oriented, flexible network, business may have the means to overcome and surpass impacts from disruption risks. The study offers knowledge on supply chain resilience and flexibility in times of crisis. Managers and practitioners might adopt the evidence to support in developing strategies towards building resilient supply chains.

Originality/value

The findings and conclusions of this paper are the product of the authors’ own work, and the research has been supported appropriately through academic contributions in the study area. All sources have been acknowledged.

Details

Continuity & Resilience Review, vol. 4 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2516-7502

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 31 March 2022

Julius Eggert and Julia Hartmann

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential synergy between companies’ sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) activities and their supply chain

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the potential synergy between companies’ sustainable supply chain management (SSCM) activities and their supply chain resilience (SCRES). The authors propose hypotheses about the impact of buying companies SSCM activities on the inflicted damage by unexpected supply chain disruptions and the recovery time afterwards and test these empirically using data from companies during the global COVID-19 pandemic.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors investigate a sample of 231 of the largest publicly traded companies in the European Union with 4.158 firm-year observations. For the analysis, the authors generate variables capturing the companies’ intensity and years of experience of their SSCM activities targeted at the supply chain and run regression analyses on the inflicted damage due to the COVID-19 pandemic and the recovery time after the disruption.

Findings

Buying companies’ SSCM activities have a positive effect on their SCRES. The damage inflicted by unexpected supply chain disruptions is lower when companies have higher levels of SSCM and longer experience with it. The recovery time afterwards is significantly reduced by longer experience with SSCM efforts.

Research limitations/implications

The authors suggest SCRES is reinforced by transparency, situational awareness, social capital and collaboration resulting from companies SSCM activities translate into increased SCRES.

Practical implications

The authors show that companies with superior SSCM are more resilient in a crisis and conclude that, therefore, companies should invest in SSCM to prevent future supply disruptions.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first empirical study analyzing a data set of multi-industry companies, linking their SSCM activities to SCRES during the pandemic.

Details

Supply Chain Management: An International Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1359-8546

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 18 February 2022

Nezih Altay and Raktim Pal

The Covid-19 pandemic exposed the fragility of global supply chains. Attempts to deepen our understanding of the effects of the pandemic on global supply chains mostly…

Abstract

Purpose

The Covid-19 pandemic exposed the fragility of global supply chains. Attempts to deepen our understanding of the effects of the pandemic on global supply chains mostly offer anecdotal evidences and lack theory grounded research. The purpose of this paper is to develop a conceptual framework to help explain supply chain disruption management.

Design/methodology/approach

This is a conceptual paper and uses a theory building approach. It develops a conceptual framework adapted from coping theory in psychology to explain supply chain disruption management. To refine the framework, the authors independently reviewed extant supply chain disruption management literature. The authors then studied the frameworks on stress theory in psychology. Following the review of both streams of literatures, the authors developed an initial draft of the conceptual model. This draft was then iteratively refined through extensive discussions among the authors.

Findings

Coping theory can help revise supply chain disruption management with an alternative lens that has not been applied before in this domain. The proposed conceptual framework is generic and can be applied to disruption management strategies for any organization in any industry.

Originality/value

The conceptual framework proposed in this paper offers a new theoretical lens to supply chain disruption management discourse. It contributes to the operational understanding of supply chain disruption management.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

Nishant Agrawal and Rajesh Kumar Jain

The study of supply chain disruption (SCD) and supply chain resilience (SCR) remains to be studied deeply in the field of business management. The purpose of this paper is…

Abstract

Purpose

The study of supply chain disruption (SCD) and supply chain resilience (SCR) remains to be studied deeply in the field of business management. The purpose of this paper is to showcase a framework of SCR strategies to reduce the adverse effects of SCD using systematic literature review and data visualization.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a systematic literature review approach, the paper explores the concepts of supply chain disruption and supply chain resilience. Through rigorous systematic screening, authors studied papers on both the concepts and have proposed a framework for the same. The authors also have used data visualization and network diagram approaches for better understanding of the topic.

Findings

The systematic literature review of both the concepts brings out some exciting results which give a new direction to supply chain field. The outcome of this research also outlines numerous future research direction, which will be useful for the research community.

Practical implications

The numerous strategies of SCR should be implemented by manufacturing as well as a service organization. The framework reported in this research help academician and practitioners to understand SCR and to easily overcome any level of disruption. Supply chain managers must also formulate strategies accordingly and make plans to continually expand the system.

Originality/value

This research is the first such attempt to showcase a formal systematic framework and co-occurrence networks as well as overlay networks of SCR and SCD.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 13 May 2021

Byung-Gak Son, Sangho Chae and Canan Kocabasoglu-Hillmer

Catastrophic supply chain disruptions can significantly damage the operational and financial performance of firms. While a growing body of literature on supply network…

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Abstract

Purpose

Catastrophic supply chain disruptions can significantly damage the operational and financial performance of firms. While a growing body of literature on supply network structures has studied what influences supply networks' vulnerability to supply chain disruptions and capability to recover from them, it remains unclear how supply network structures change after major supply chain disruptions. We aim to provide an understanding of how these changes occur.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a natural experiment approach and supply network data from Factset, this study investigates how firms' supply network structures change after experiencing the catastrophic supply chain disruptions caused by the 2011 Tohoku earthquake and tsunami in Japan. We capture post-earthquake supply network changes using the measures of degree centrality and ego network density.

Findings

The results of the analysis suggest that compared to unaffected firms, the affected firms experience changes in their supply network structures tending toward lower complexity measured by in-degree centrality, out-degree centrality and ego network density.

Originality/value

This study contributes to social network theory and the complex adaptive supply network literature by providing empirical evidence of structural changes in supply networks after catastrophic supply chain disruptions. A managerial contribution is made by providing a reflection on why these changes might be occurring and alert firms to the challenges of managing complexity in their supply networks.

Details

International Journal of Operations & Production Management, vol. 41 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0144-3577

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 22 December 2020

Ernest Kissi, Kofi Agyekum, Labaran Musah, De-Graft Owusu-Manu and Caleb Debrah

Supply chain (SC) disruption, whether demand sided or supply sided, is conversely perceived to affect organisational performance of construction firms. This paper…

Abstract

Purpose

Supply chain (SC) disruption, whether demand sided or supply sided, is conversely perceived to affect organisational performance of construction firms. This paper, therefore, aims to examine the linkage of supply chain disruptions with organisational performance of construction firms through the moderating role of innovation.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a quantitative research, approach the views of 84 construction professionals were elicited using a structured questionnaire. Ordinary least squares were utilised to validate the hypotheses set.

Findings

The study proved that there is a negative relationship between demand-related disruption and business performance as well as project performance. Also, it was clear from the study that supply-related disruptions had a significant impact on both project performance and business performance. Although SC innovation was seen to impact business performance, it had no relationship with project performance. Generally, innovation was seen to have a moderating effect of demand and supply disruption of project performance, but it played no moderating role in business performance.

Practical implications

The findings suggest that business firms must be innovative with the supply chain, as it moderated project success. The supply chain of a construction firm plays a very critical role on projects; hence, this study recommends that a supply chain manager ought to be innovative in their operations due to the moderating role SC innovation has on project performance and largely business performance.

Originality/value

Various studies on supply chain has been done on different sectors in the economy; however, little can be said about the construction industry on how supply chain disruptions affects business and project performance and how innovation moderates such effects.

Details

Journal of Financial Management of Property and Construction , vol. 26 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-4387

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 26 March 2020

Artur Swierczek

The goal of the paper is twofold. First, it aims to empirically conceptualize whether a wide array of fragmented demand planning activities, performed in supply chains

Abstract

Purpose

The goal of the paper is twofold. First, it aims to empirically conceptualize whether a wide array of fragmented demand planning activities, performed in supply chains, can be logically categorized into actionable sets of practices, which then form a broader conceptualization of the demand planning process. Second, regarding certain contextual factors, our research seeks to investigate the contribution of demand planning, as a higher-order construct, to mitigating disruptions induced by operational risks in supply chains.

Design/methodology/approach

In this study, PLS-SEM was used to estimate the reflective-formative nature of the model. The results of PLS-SEM were additionally complemented by the assessment of the predictive power of our model. Finally, to reveal possible contingency effects, the multigroup analysis (MGA) was conducted.

Findings

The study suggests that demand planning process (DPP) is a second-order construct that is composed of four sets of practices, including goal setting, data gathering, demand forecasting, communicating the demand predictions and synchronizing supply with demand. The study also reveals that the demand planning practices, only when considered together, as a higher-order factor, significantly contribute to mitigating disruptions driven by operational risks. Finally, the research shows that the strength of the impact of demand planning on disruptions is contextually dependent.

Research limitations/implications

While the study makes some important contributions, the obtained findings ought to be considered within the context of limitations. First, the study only investigates disruptions driven by operational risks, ignoring the negative consequences of environmental risks (terrorist attacks, natural disasters, etc.), which may have a far more negative impact on supply chains. Second, the sample is mostly composed of medium and large companies, not necessarily representative of demand planning performed by the entire spectrum of companies operating in the market.

Practical implications

The study shows that to effectively mitigate disruptions induced by operational risks, the demand planning practices should be integrated into a higher-order construct. Likewise, our research demonstrates that the intensity of demand planning process is contingent upon a number of contextual factors, including firm size, demand variability and demand volume.

Social implications

The study indicates that to mitigate disruptions of operational risk, demand planning as a higher-order dynamic capability can be referred to the concept of organizational learning, which contributes to forming a critical common ground, ensuring the balance between formal and informal dynamic routines.

Originality/value

The paper depicts that to fully deal with disruptions, the demand planning practices need to be integrated and categorized into the dedicated higher-order. This may lead to forming demand planning as a higher-order dynamic capability that provides a more rapid and efficient rebuttal to any disruptions triggered by operational risks.

Details

The International Journal of Logistics Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0957-4093

Keywords

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