Search results

1 – 10 of over 89000
Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 24 August 2020

Hadi Karimikia, Harminder Singh and Damien Joseph

Individuals can improve their task performance by using information and communications technology (ICT). However, individuals who use ICT may also suffer from negative

Abstract

Purpose

Individuals can improve their task performance by using information and communications technology (ICT). However, individuals who use ICT may also suffer from negative outcomes, such as burnout and anxiety, which lead to poorer performance and well-being. While researchers have studied the positive outcomes of ICT use in the aggregate, the same has not been done for negative outcomes.

Design/methodology/approach

This study uses a meta-analysis of 52 studies to examine the relationship between ICT use and negative outcomes, and the influence of job autonomy on ICT use and the negative outcomes of ICT use. Job autonomy is relevant because a higher level of job autonomy allows individuals to decide how, how often and when they will use ICT that is causing negative outcomes for their work.

Findings

The results of the meta-analysis revealed that ICT use increased negative job outcomes and that, unexpectedly, autonomy exacerbated this effect.

Research limitations/implications

The results of this study point to the prevalence of negative outcomes from ICT use among individuals. Researchers should study how users may potentially restrict the value that organizations may be able to obtain from the implementation of new systems, especially whether individual-level negative outcomes could coalesce into a collective resistance. There also needs to be further research into the motivating and inhibiting roles of autonomy in enhancing ICT use, while mitigating its negative impacts simultaneously.

Originality/value

The study provides an aggregate analysis of the negative impacts of ICT use among individuals and the role of autonomy in the relationship.

Details

Internet Research, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1066-2243

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 4 October 2018

Stephanie Jacobsen

This paper aims to develop a link between word-of-mouth and attribution of credit or blame following a purchase. Attribution is important because it can affect repurchase…

Downloads
1688

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to develop a link between word-of-mouth and attribution of credit or blame following a purchase. Attribution is important because it can affect repurchase behavior, loyalty and word-of-mouth; therefore, understanding who receives credit or blame for a purchase outcome following a product recommendation is critical.

Design/methodology/approach

Through three studies, how recommendation context affects attribution of credit or blame to consumers, reviewers and retailers is experimentally examined. These studies test the thesis that context factors that are independent of the product recommendation can affect how consumers assign responsibility for the product’s performance.

Findings

Results demonstrate that while consumers trust online reviews, the addition of reviewer incentives diminish that trust, especially when a consumer identifies with the retailer. Findings show support for retailers using online reviews and provide evidence for using caution when incentivizing reviewers.

Research limitations/implications

This study makes a theoretical connection between word-of-mouth (reviews) and attribution. As this connection is not seen often in the literature, future research should look at the role the recommender plays in the purchasing process. This study forced participants to attribute a purchase success/failure to certain parties to find a baseline with which to begin. Future studies should look at this process as more spontaneous. It may not always occur or possibly only occur for certain types of purchases or experiences.

Practical implications

Retailers should be continuing to use online reviews as they provide protection from blame and an increase in credit for successful outcomes. This study also provides evidence that incorporating social media into online reviews as many sites have been doing may actually backfire. While it might be more helpful to the consumer, it can increase blame to the retailer. Reviewers are receiving incentives more frequently, and this study finds that loyal consumers should not be shown incentivized reviews as it heightens blame after a negative outcome.

Social implications

While attribution has been found to be an important part of the purchasing process, it has not been looked at in relationship to word-of-mouth/electronic word-of-mouth (offline/online reviews). Knowing that who recommends a product to us impacts post-purchase behavior is important, as online reviews are utilized more frequently. Many social media strategies have been implemented without information as to how the retailer themselves will be impacted. This study provides evidence of how to better utilize online reviews.

Originality/value

Though online reviews have been studied widely, less is known about how reviews and product recommendations affect attribution of credit or blame for a post-purchase outcome. The theoretical link between word-of-mouth and product outcome attribution provided here will help guide future research in this area.

Details

Journal of Research in Interactive Marketing, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2040-7122

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 25 July 2008

Paul Harvey, Mark J. Martinko and Nancy Borkowski

Building on a recent study of Weiner's (1985a) attribution–emotion–behavior model, we examine the extent to which negative affective states mediate the relationship…

Abstract

Building on a recent study of Weiner's (1985a) attribution–emotion–behavior model, we examine the extent to which negative affective states mediate the relationship between attributions for undesirable outcomes and the ability to justify ethically questionable behaviors. Results of a scenario-based study indicated that causal attributions were associated with affective states and behavioral justification in the general manner predicted. Affective states were not associated with behavior justification, however, indicating that only a direct association between attributions and justification existed. Implications for future research on attributions and emotions are discussed.

Details

Emotions, Ethics and Decision-Making
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-84663-941-8

Click here to view access options
Book part
Publication date: 13 August 2018

Robert L. Dipboye

Abstract

Details

The Emerald Review of Industrial and Organizational Psychology
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-786-9

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 24 April 2009

John McClure, Jo White and Chris G. Sibley

The purpose of this paper is to show whether positive or negative framing of preparation messages leads to higher intentions to prepare for earthquakes, and whether the…

Downloads
1016

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to show whether positive or negative framing of preparation messages leads to higher intentions to prepare for earthquakes, and whether the more important component of the message is the framing of the preparation action or the framing of the outcome of not preparing.

Design/methodology/approach

Four message conditions were created by crossing the framing of preparation actions (taking or not taking action) and the framing of outcomes (experiencing harm and avoiding harm in an earthquake). They were presented to citizens (n=240) in Wellington, New Zealand, who judged the general importance of preparation and specific preparation steps.

Findings

The study finds that intentions to undertake both general and specific preparation were higher with negatively framed outcomes than positive outcomes. With specific actions, negative outcomes led to higher intentions to prepare when the action frame was positive (i.e. being well prepared).

Research limitations/implications

This research shows that negative framing should apply to outcome preparation and not to the action of preparing

Practical implications

These findings clarify that negative framing of outcomes is likely to increase preventive actions in relation to natural hazards.

Originality/value

This is the first study to show the affects of message framing on preparing for disasters.

Details

Disaster Prevention and Management: An International Journal, vol. 18 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0965-3562

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 22 September 2017

Lars Glasø, Anders Skogstad, Guy Notelaers and Ståle Einarsen

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which emotional experiences mediate the relationships between employees’ perception of considerate and/or tyrannical…

Downloads
1581

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the extent to which emotional experiences mediate the relationships between employees’ perception of considerate and/or tyrannical leadership behaviors and their work engagement and intention to leave the organization. The notion of symmetric and asymmetric relationships between specific kinds of leadership behavior, emotional reactions, and followers’ attitudinal outcomes is also examined.

Design/methodology/approach

Employing a survey design, the variables were assessed in a cross-sectional sample of 312 employees.

Findings

The study confirmed the notion of symmetric relationships between specific kinds of leadership behavior, emotional reactions, and followers’ attitudinal outcomes. Contrary to the general notion that “bad is stronger than good,” the results indicated that positive emotions were equal or stronger mediators than the negative ones regarding the two outcomes measured in the present study.

Originality/value

The paper is, to the authors’ knowledge, the first paper which examines simultaneously how constructive and destructive leadership styles, and positive and negative affects, are related to employee attitudes outcomes, and evokes a discussion when bad is stronger than good or vice versa regarding leadership outcomes.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 39 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 23 May 2008

I.J. Hetty van Emmerik, Arnold B. Bakker and Martin C. Euwema

Departing from Hobfoll's conservation of resources theory, the paper aims to examine the relationship between resource losses (excessive job demands and unfavorable…

Downloads
2362

Abstract

Purpose

Departing from Hobfoll's conservation of resources theory, the paper aims to examine the relationship between resource losses (excessive job demands and unfavorable performance feedback) on the one hand, and negative job attitudes (dissatisfaction, reduced commitment, intention to leave) and burnout (exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced personal accomplishment) on the other hand.

Design/methodology/approach

The sample included surveys from 272 male constabulary officers who had participated in a developmental assessment center. Data were analyzed using hierarchical regression.

Findings

The results showed direct associations between resource losses and negative outcomes. There were indications for the development of loss spirals for four out of six negative outcomes. Specifically, these relationships between job demands and negative outcomes were stronger for those officers receiving unfavorable feedback than for officers not receiving unfavorable feedback.

Practical implications

Employees confronted with excessive job demands and unfavorable developmental assessment center (DAC) feedback were most vulnerable to combined resource losses, and this experience was associated with negative outcomes (i.e. more dissatisfaction, less affective commitment, more emotional exhaustion, and more cynicism).

Originality/value

The unique contribution of this study is that, besides balancing the benefits of using DACs with the costs of implementation, it is emphasized that it is important to anticipate consequences of unfavorable feedback. Moreover, the disappointment and association with negative outcomes should be explicitly considered in the design of the DAC.

Details

Journal of Management Development, vol. 27 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0262-1711

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2010

Paul Harvey, James K. Summers and Mark J. Martinko

We review past research on the relationship between attributional perceptions, emotions, and workplace aggression and develop a conceptual model that extends this research…

Abstract

We review past research on the relationship between attributional perceptions, emotions, and workplace aggression and develop a conceptual model that extends this research in two ways. First, we consider the influence of controllability attributions on the type (otherdirected, self-directed, hostile, non-hostile) and likelihood of aggressive responses to negative workplace outcomes and situations. Second, we consider the extent to which discrete negative emotions might mediate these attribution-aggression relationships. Implications for anticipating and preventing workplace aggression based on this conceptual model are discussed.

Details

International Journal of Organization Theory & Behavior, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1093-4537

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 26 October 2020

Hussain Alshahrani and Diane Pennington

This study aims to investigate the outcomes that researchers expect from using social media for knowledge sharing and to explore how these outcomes impact their use.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the outcomes that researchers expect from using social media for knowledge sharing and to explore how these outcomes impact their use.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted 30 semi-structured interviews with researchers at a major Scottish university. They analysed the interview transcripts using directed content analysis.

Findings

Researchers expect social and personal outcomes from the use of social media to share knowledge. Each type has positive and negative forms. The positive outcomes motivate researchers to use it, whereas negative outcomes prevent them from using it.

Research limitations/implications

This study extends the integrative theoretical framework of outcome expectations within the social cognitive theory by exploring these outcomes and their relative amount of influence on sharing ideas, experiences, questions and research outputs on social media. While the participants included academic staff and postdoctoral researchers, the majority were PhD students.

Practical implications

The findings will help individual researchers and universities to use social media effectively in sharing ideas and promoting research through identifying the positive outcomes. Identifying the negative outcomes will help in using solutions to overcome them.

Originality/value

This is the first known study to investigate the outcome expectations that impact researchers’ use of social media for knowledge sharing.

Details

Global Knowledge, Memory and Communication, vol. 70 no. 4/5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9342

Keywords

Click here to view access options
Article
Publication date: 9 February 2018

Jillian C. Sweeney, Carolin Plewa and Ralf Zurbruegg

This paper aims to advance research and practice on value, and more specifically value-in-use, by enhancing knowledge of not only positive but also negative value-in-use…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to advance research and practice on value, and more specifically value-in-use, by enhancing knowledge of not only positive but also negative value-in-use facets in a complex relational context, developing a psychometrically sound measure of these facets and evaluating their effect on various outcome measures across different customer segments.

Design/methodology/approach

A three-stage study was undertaken in the professional service context of financial planning. Following a qualitative stage identifying positive and negative facets of value-in-use, a measurement scale was developed and tested, and extended analysis was undertaken through two quantitative stages.

Findings

The findings provide converging evidence that clients in the study context realise value-in-use, defined in this study at a benefit rather than outcome level, through nine core facets, four positive (expertise, education, motivation, convenience) and five negative (monetary, time and effort, lifestyle, emotional [financial planner], emotional [situation]). While all nine facets impact on at least one of the investigated outcomes, results show that, overall, positive value-in-use facets outweigh the negative ones, with the impact of facets varying depending on client factors (such as customer participation and time to retirement).

Originality/value

The primary contributions of this paper lie in the conceptualisation and measurement of both positive and negative value-in-use facets and their interplay in generating customer outcomes, as well as in the development of a psychometrically sound measure of this construct. Negative value-in-use facets have not been explored to date, despite consumers being sometimes more concerned with risks than gains. Furthermore, the research offers novel insight into the impact of both positive and negative value-in-use on relevant outcomes, while also offering evidence as to the importance of segmentation dimensions in this context.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 52 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

1 – 10 of over 89000