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Article
Publication date: 1 April 1990

J.K. Sager

Discusses the results of a study designed to investigate how salesmanagers experience job stress. Considers the particular extra jobresponsibilities of managers compared…

Abstract

Discusses the results of a study designed to investigate how sales managers experience job stress. Considers the particular extra job responsibilities of managers compared with salespeople as stress factors. Concludes that over‐involvement and general dissatisfaction with life are more important job stress factors for sales managers than are personal characteristics.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 7 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2006

Jui‐Chen Chen, Colin Silverthorne and Jung‐Yao Hung

To further understand the impact of organizational communication and commitment on job stress and performance. Over the past 20 years, the constructs of organizational…

16528

Abstract

Purpose

To further understand the impact of organizational communication and commitment on job stress and performance. Over the past 20 years, the constructs of organizational commitment and communication have been studied extensively but little attention has been paid to the relationship between them and other organizational variables such as job performance and stress. Also, differences between employees either in managerial or full time accounting positions and between respondents from the USA and Taiwan were evaluated.

Design/methodology/approach

Differences and relationships were assessed using standardized and valid instruments measuring four organizational variables in Taiwan and the USA.

Findings

No country level difference in stress and communication levels were found but organizational commitment and performance levels were higher in the USA. At the same time, higher levels of organizational communication led to higher levels of organizational commitment and job performance in both countries. Rather surprisingly, stress levels were not found to be related to either organizational communication or job performance. Further, the only measure that indicated a difference between those in managerial and full time accounting positions was work performance which was higher for those doing full time accounting.

Practical implications

The results are discussed in terms of their importance and implications for organizations, particularly those utilizing employees with professional training and operating in different cultures. The finding that stress levels were not reduced by increased organizational communication and had little impact on job performance suggests that in the accounting field stress may play a different role than it does in other professions.

Originality/value

Furthers our understanding on the impact of organizational communication and commitment on job stress and performance.

Details

Leadership & Organization Development Journal, vol. 27 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7739

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 28 April 2022

Han Chen and Rui Qi

The COVID-19 pandemic intensifies the high turnover rate in the restaurant industry. Applying the conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study aims to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic intensifies the high turnover rate in the restaurant industry. Applying the conservation of resources (COR) theory, this study aims to examine the factors influencing US restaurant frontline employees’ organizational and occupational turnover intention with an emphasis on the three-way interactions between job stress, fear of COVID-19 (FC) and resilience.

Design/methodology/approach

A sample of 243 US restaurant frontline employees participated in this study. PROCESS macro was used for hypothesis testing.

Findings

Organizational turnover intention fully mediated the relationship between job stress and restaurant employees’ occupational turnover intention. FC intensified the positive relationship between job stress and organizational turnover intentions. Job stress, FC and resilience interacted to affect restaurant frontline employees’ organizational turnover intention such that when resilience is high, FC strengthened the positive relationship between job stress and organizational turnover intention, and the indirect effect of job stress on occupational turnover intention via organizational turnover intention.

Practical implications

Restaurants should take measures to reduce frontline employees’ fear and continue implementing practices to alleviate job stress during a crisis to reduce employees’ turnover intentions. Training on building employee resilience could also be provided by restaurant operators.

Originality/value

This study added to the limited knowledge of factors that are associated with restaurant employees’ organizational and occupational turnover intentions in the context of a global crisis and expanded the current knowledge of how fear and resilience may impact restaurant employees’ behavioral intentions.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 April 2022

Hina Khan, Jawad Abbas, Kalpina Kumari and Hina Najam

Perception of organizational politics is one of the key factors of the organization's performance. Based on the principles of Game Theory, this study aims to examine the…

Abstract

Purpose

Perception of organizational politics is one of the key factors of the organization's performance. Based on the principles of Game Theory, this study aims to examine the impact of management's and employee's politics within an organization on the psychological and organizational stress levels of workers, followed by their task and contextual performance.

Design/methodology/approach

Following the non-probability convenience sampling technique, the data was collected from the managerial and non-managerial staff of public, private and semi-government services organizations in Rawalpindi, Islamabad, Lahore, Faisalabad, Gujranwala, Abbottabad and Karachi cities in Pakistan.

Findings

The structural analyses indicate that organizational politics is a major cause of stress among workers and has a significant positive impact on the psychological and organizational stress of workers. Moreover, both organizational politics and job stress hinder workers' performance.

Originality/value

The findings of the current research provide valuable insights into the management of firms about the destructive role of politics with a special focus on psychological and organizational stress, followed by job and contextual performance, particularly in the context of Pakistan. It also proposes strategies to counter this issue, improving worker's performance. Furthermore, the findings also suggest whether management or employees are more involved in organizational politics.

Details

Journal of Economic and Administrative Sciences, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1026-4116

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 January 2018

Huat Bin (Andy) Ang and Arch G. Woodside

This study applies asymmetric rather than conventional symmetric analysis to advance theory in occupational psychology. The study applies systematic case-based analyses to…

Abstract

This study applies asymmetric rather than conventional symmetric analysis to advance theory in occupational psychology. The study applies systematic case-based analyses to model complex relations among conditions (i.e., configurations of high and low scores for variables) in terms of set memberships of managers. The study uses Boolean algebra to identify configurations (i.e., recipes) reflecting complex conditions sufficient for the occurrence of outcomes of interest (e.g., high versus low financial job stress, job strain, and job satisfaction). The study applies complexity theory tenets to offer a nuanced perspective concerning the occurrence of contrarian cases – for example, in identifying different cases (e.g., managers) with high membership scores in a variable (e.g., core self-evaluation) who have low job satisfaction scores and when different cases with low membership scores in the same variable have high job satisfaction. In a large-scale empirical study of managers (n = 928) in four (contextual) segments of the farm industry in New Zealand, this study tests the fit and predictive validities of set membership configurations for simple and complex antecedent conditions that indicate high/low core self-evaluations, job stress, and high/low job satisfaction. The findings support the conclusion that complexity theory in combination with configural analysis offers useful insights for explaining nuances in the causes and outcomes to high stress as well as low stress among farm managers. Some findings support and some are contrary to symmetric relationship findings (i.e., highly significant correlations that support main effect hypotheses).

Details

Improving the Marriage of Modeling and Theory for Accurate Forecasts of Outcomes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78635-122-7

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 9 September 2019

Yongmei Liu

Integrating relationship marketing and management research, the author explores internal selling (i.e., a salesperson’s internally focused efforts intended to identify…

Abstract

Integrating relationship marketing and management research, the author explores internal selling (i.e., a salesperson’s internally focused efforts intended to identify, solicit, and use internal sales resources to support external selling activities) as a unique source of salespeople role stress and examine its contingent outcomes. The conceptual model suggests that internal selling as a job demand and stressor leads to increased salespeople role stress. However, a number of situational (i.e., selling organization market orientation, service climate, and seller–buyer relationship) and individual factors (i.e., networking ability and psychological capital of the salespeople) serve as job and personal resources to moderate the internal selling–outcome relationships, such that when such resources are adequate, internal selling will reduce role stress and increase sales performance. The author also examines situational (i.e., customer solutions offering and formalization of the selling organization) and individual (i.e., salespeople power and social status) antecedents of internal selling. The model provides useful insights and practical guidance for selling organizations to recognize mechanisms associated with internal selling in their organizations, and to intentionally design within organization support systems to enhance salespeople well being and enable them to participate effectively in the relational process of selling. The chapter stresses the need to develop context-specific stress models for different occupations and job roles.

Details

Examining the Role of Well-being in the Marketing Discipline
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-946-6

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 15 February 2022

Yilmaz Akgunduz, Ovunc Bardakoglu and Gaye Kizilcalioglu

Based on The Conservation of Resources Theory (COR), Spillover Theory and Social Exchange Theory (SET), this study investigates the mediating role of job dedication in the…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on The Conservation of Resources Theory (COR), Spillover Theory and Social Exchange Theory (SET), this study investigates the mediating role of job dedication in the relationships between job stress, happiness and perceived organizational support (POS).

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected from 5-star resort hotel employees in Turkey. 362 valid questionnaires were collected. The research hypotheses were tested using Covariance-Based Structural Equation Modeling (CB-SEM).

Findings

The analysis results show that POS is positively related to employee happiness and job dedication. Job stress is negatively related to employee happiness but positively related to job dedication. Job dedication partially mediates the relationships between job stress and happiness, and POS and happiness.

Research limitations/implications

The study's findings could be used by hotel managers to improve employees' job dedication, which will lead to increased employee happiness. Together with qualitative and quantitative research methods, future research could be conducted on the predecessors of job dedication and comparatively on employee happiness for different country samples.

Practical implications

In order to increase employee happiness, Turkish hotel managers may want to increase POS and decrease perceived job stress of their employees. Although it was found out in this study that job stress increases job dedication, it is also accepted that this unexpected situation arises due to special conditions. Therefore, by reducing job stress, hotel managers may prefer to increase the job dedication of their employees and their happiness indirectly.

Originality/value

The current study contributes to the hospitality management literature by investigating the organizational factors behind employee happiness. In addition, it also explored in depth the mediating effect of job dedication on the relationships between POS, job stress and happiness.

Details

Journal of Hospitality and Tourism Insights, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9792

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 2 October 2012

Mindy K. Shoss and Tahira M. Probst

Employees today face a number of threats to their work and financial well-being (i.e., economic stress). In an aim to provide an agenda and theoretical framework for…

Abstract

Employees today face a number of threats to their work and financial well-being (i.e., economic stress). In an aim to provide an agenda and theoretical framework for research on multilevel outcomes of economic stress, the current chapter considers how employees’ economic stress gives rise to emergent outcomes and how these emergent outcomes feed back to influence well-being. Specifically, we draw from Conservation of Resources theory to integrate competing theoretical perspectives with regard to employees’ behavioral responses to economic stress. As employees’ behaviors influence those with whom they interact, we propose that behavioral responses to economic stress have implications for group-level well-being (e.g., interpersonal climate, cohesion) and group-level economic stress. In turn, group-level and individual-level behavioral outcomes influence well-being and economic stress in a multilevel resource loss cycle. We discuss potential opportunities and challenges associated with testing this model as well as how it could be used to examine higher-level emergent effects (e.g., at the organizational level).

Details

The Role of the Economic Crisis on Occupational Stress and Well Being
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-005-5

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 30 December 2004

Mark Tausig, Rudy Fenwick, Steven L. Sauter, Lawrence R. Murphy and Corina Graif

The nature of work has changed in the past 30 years but we do not know what these changes have meant for worker job stress. In this chapter we compare data from three…

Abstract

The nature of work has changed in the past 30 years but we do not know what these changes have meant for worker job stress. In this chapter we compare data from three surveys of the quality of work life from 1972 to 2002. At the most general level, work today is less stressful than it was in 1972. Workers report fewer job demands, more decision latitude, less job strain, more job security and greater access to job resources and job support. However, these changes have not affected all workers equally. Women, those with less education, non self-employed workers, blue collar workers and workers in manufacturing industries showed the greatest decreases in job stress although levels of job stress remain higher than for comparison groups (men, college educated, white collar, service workers). Changes were not always linear across time suggesting that some aspects of job strain are sensitive to economic cycles.

Details

Exploring Interpersonal Dynamics
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-76231-153-8

Book part
Publication date: 5 September 2018

Stacy Ann Hawkins, Loryana L. Vie, Pedro S. A. Wolf, Paul B. Lester, Kerry S. Whittaker, Jacob N. Hawkins and Alycia L. Perez

Job performance in the US Army is a complex construct, in part because of the stressors that soldiers face, both day-to-day and during deployment. This chapter critically…

Abstract

Job performance in the US Army is a complex construct, in part because of the stressors that soldiers face, both day-to-day and during deployment. This chapter critically reviews job performance, and the connections between performance and stress and health, discussing how findings may also be relevant within the specific context of the Army. We review established conceptualizations and metrics of job performance within the Army as well as the civilian sector. Then, we discuss the existing research on the associations between performance and stress, physical health, health behaviors, and mental health. Considering these findings, we discuss lessons learned for Army performance metrics, recommending that stress- and health-related issues be incorporated into unit and leader performance metrics, with two critical caveats: (1) data are aggregated at a company level and (2) non-reactive measures are used. Finally, we discuss how existing data repositories can facilitate future research and note potential constraints of using secondary data.

Details

Occupational Stress and Well-Being in Military Contexts
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78756-184-7

Keywords

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