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Article
Publication date: 30 August 2011

Simon P. Philbin

The purpose of this research is to identify how the management of university institutes can be improved through adoption of an integrated performance measurement system

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this research is to identify how the management of university institutes can be improved through adoption of an integrated performance measurement system based on the Balanced Scorecard.

Design/methodology/approach

Through building on literature studies and management best practice, formulation of the performance measurement system was explored. The Balanced Scorecard solution was then designed and implemented at a university institute. Benefits and outcomes are discussed through reflective analysis of the case study investigation.

Findings

The study identified how the development of scorecard reports that include economic and non‐economic measures can improve the operational management of a university institute through providing tangible benefits to stakeholders.

Research limitations/implications

The scorecard was investigated at an industry‐supported university institute and so features of the scorecard design and implementation may be less relevant to other types of organisations.

Practical implications

This research paper provides details on how the scorecard has been modified to provide an accessible and durable measurement system. The paper includes specific guidance for practitioners who are considering implementing the scorecard.

Social implications

The role of intellectual capital and soft measures as systemic determinants of performance is discussed and this is viewed in terms of university‐industry collaborations.

Originality/value

A comprehensive literature review underpins a two‐year research project involving strategy mapping, design and implementation of the Balanced Scorecard. Advice on modification of the scorecard and provision of representative data and information from reports serve to further the scorecard research agenda.

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Article
Publication date: 13 January 2012

Jane M. Russell, Shirley Ainsworth and Janet Díaz‐Aguilar

This paper aims to determine to what extent the scientific production and research activities of a group of National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) research…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine to what extent the scientific production and research activities of a group of National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM) research institutes in the sciences, social sciences and humanities are visible on the internet with a view to identifying areas where web presence is not optimal so improvements can be made.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors do this by analysing the relevant information on their web sites and by comparing institutional listings of scientific production between 2005 and 2006, with papers reported in the international, multidisciplinary online services of the Web of Science and Scopus, as well as in Clase and Periódica which cover production in Latin American journals.

Findings

Results indicate general poor visibility of research activities and production in the institutional web sites with only limited access to full text articles. Web sites of the institutes in the sciences score better than those in the humanities and social sciences where book publication is an important research output. The official publication lists in the form of annual reports were found not to accurately represent production with additional papers attributed to the different institutions appearing in commercial databases. It is suggested that more effort should be directed towards improving the information content and access to research data on these institutional web sites, possibly through linkage to an UNAM repository.

Originality/value

This is the first study to critically examine the visibility of research on Mexican academic web sites for which a series of indicators related to the different categories of research information which would ideally be found on institutional pages were developed.

Details

Aslib Proceedings, vol. 64 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0001-253X

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 26 March 2018

Betty Steenkamer, Caroline Baan, Kim Putters, Hans van Oers and Hanneke Drewes

A range of strategies to improve pharmaceutical care has been implemented by population health management (PHM) initiatives. However, which strategies generate the desired…

Abstract

Purpose

A range of strategies to improve pharmaceutical care has been implemented by population health management (PHM) initiatives. However, which strategies generate the desired outcomes is largely unknown. The purpose of this paper is to identify guiding principles underlying collaborative strategies to improve pharmaceutical care and the contextual factors and mechanisms through which these principles operate.

Design/methodology/approach

The evaluation was informed by a realist methodology examining the links between PHM strategies, their outcomes and the contexts and mechanisms by which these strategies operate. Guiding principles were identified by grouping context-specific strategies with specific outcomes.

Findings

In total, ten guiding principles were identified: create agreement and commitment based on a long-term vision; foster cooperation and representation at the board level; use layered governance structures; create awareness at all levels; enable interpersonal links at all levels; create learning environments; organize shared responsibility; adjust financial strategies to market contexts; organize mutual gains; and align regional agreements with national policies and regulations. Contextual factors such as shared savings influenced the effectiveness of the guiding principles. Mechanisms by which these guiding principles operate were, for instance, fostering trust and creating a shared sense of the problem.

Practical implications

The guiding principles highlight how collaboration can be stimulated to improve pharmaceutical care while taking into account local constraints and possibilities. The interdependency of these principles necessitates effectuating them together in order to realize the best possible improvements and outcomes.

Originality/value

This is the first study using a realist approach to understand the guiding principles underlying collaboration to improve pharmaceutical care.

Details

Journal of Health Organization and Management, vol. 32 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1477-7266

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Article
Publication date: 22 September 2020

Mohammad Gharipour and Amber L. Trout

Our lived experiences are complex, dynamic and increasingly connected locally and globally through virtual realities that call for an evolution and responsiveness from the…

Abstract

Purpose

Our lived experiences are complex, dynamic and increasingly connected locally and globally through virtual realities that call for an evolution and responsiveness from the field of architecture education. To ensure future built environments are designed to nurture healing and health, this paper aims to address a critical need in architecture education to integrate knowledge of health and social-behavioral disciplines in students' course work. The authors will outline the process of preparing a new multidisciplinary course on health and the built environment (HBE) at the School of Architecture and Planning at Morgan State University in Baltimore, USA, as an effort to challenge the barriers of discipline-specific pathways to learning in the field of architecture.

Design/methodology/approach

The central question is how to develop an active learning pedagogy to foster a multidisciplinary learning environment focused on the “practice” (how to) of human-design-oriented approaches to improve the capability of built and natural environments to promote health and healing. The course intentionally centered on the real-life experiences of students to ground their new understanding of health and well-being fields. The course proposal went through an extensive peer-review process of reviewers from the National Institute of Health (NIH) and other departments at Morgan State University to ensure a balance between health- and architecture-specific curricula with a transdisciplinary approach to understanding complex health issues.

Findings

This paper shows the effectiveness of tools and techniques applied in the course to challenge architectural students to integrate various health and behavior perspectives in their designs and to apply health and healing principals to their current and future design projects.

Originality/value

While there are courses in American universities that offer a traditional introduction to health concerns related to the built environment, there is limited focus on the perspective of the design field approach to improve health and healing outcomes.

Details

Archnet-IJAR: International Journal of Architectural Research, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2631-6862

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 22 June 2012

Jorge Teixeira, Lia Patrício, Nuno J. Nunes, Leonel Nóbrega, Raymond P. Fisk and Larry Constantine

Customer experience has become increasingly important for service organizations that see it as a source of sustainable competitive advantage, and for service designers…

Abstract

Purpose

Customer experience has become increasingly important for service organizations that see it as a source of sustainable competitive advantage, and for service designers, who consider it fundamental to any service design project.

Design/methodology/approach

Integrating contributions from different fields, CEM was conceptually developed to represent the different aspects of customer experience in a holistic diagrammatic representation. CEM was further developed with an application to a multimedia service. To further develop and build CEM's models, 17 customers of a multimedia service provider were interviewed and the data were analyzed using Grounded Theory methodology.

Findings

Combining multidisciplinary contributions to represent customer experience elements enables the systematization of its complex information. The application to a multimedia service highlights how CEM can facilitate the work of multidisciplinary design teams by providing more insightful inputs to service design.

Originality/value

CEM supports the holistic nature of customer experience, providing a systematic portrayal of its context and shifting the focus from single experience elements to their orchestration.

Details

Journal of Service Management, vol. 23 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-5818

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 9 May 2016

Victoria Walton, Anne Hogden, Julie Johnson and David Greenfield

The purpose of this paper is to classify and describe the purpose of ward rounds, who attends each round and their role, and participants’ perception of each other’s role…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to classify and describe the purpose of ward rounds, who attends each round and their role, and participants’ perception of each other’s role during the respective ward rounds.

Design/methodology/approach

A literature review of face-to-face ward rounds in medical wards was conducted. Peer reviewed journals and government publications published between 2000 and 2014 were searched. Articles were classified according to the type of round described in the study. Purposes were identified using keywords in the description of why the round was carried out. Descriptions of tasks and interactions with team members defined participant roles.

Findings

Eight round classifications were identified. The most common were the generalised ward; multidisciplinary; and consultant rounds. Multidisciplinary rounds were the most collaborative round. Medical officers were the most likely discipline to attend any round. There was limited reference to allied health clinicians and patient involvement on rounds. Perceptions attendees held of each other reiterated the need to continue to investigate teamwork.

Practical implications

A collaborative approach to care planning can occur by ensuring clinicians and patients are aware of different ward round processes and their role in them.

Originality/value

Analysis fulfils a gap in the literature by identifying and analysing the different ward rounds being undertaken in acute medical wards. It identifies the complexities in the long established routine hospital processes of the ward round.

Details

International Journal of Health Care Quality Assurance, vol. 29 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0952-6862

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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2008

Jan Karlsson, Elsie Anderberg, Shirley Booth, Per Odenrick and Marita Christmansson

The purpose of this paper is to analyse and describe the learning that takes place in the interaction between academics from different disciplines and perspectives in…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to analyse and describe the learning that takes place in the interaction between academics from different disciplines and perspectives in collaboration with practitioners.

Design/methodology/approach

The research draws on theories of learning that view it in relation to context, where the most significant features of the learning process concern discerning new aspects of a phenomenon. The study focuses on the workplace learning of researchers in a multidisciplinary programme at the National Institute for Working Life in Sweden (NIWL). Data was collected from semi‐structured interviews. In the analysis the learning experienced was discerned by identifying how the participants spoke of developing and changing in their work as researchers.

Findings

The investigation identified five categories of learning of the academics in the multidisciplinary research programme, namely: deepened awareness of perspectives and concepts; practical development; new awareness of one's competences and professional learning process; flexible professionalism and practical usefulness; insights into research and development processes.

Practical implications

The study contributes to an increased understanding of how knowledge production and academics' workplace learning is constituted in multidisciplinary contexts and research programmes involving practitioners from outside academia.

Originality/value

In organising and supporting learning and knowledge exchange in inter‐ or multidisciplinary research programmes with (or without) practitioners, it is essential to be aware of the importance of relational and contextual implications for academics' learning processes.

Details

Journal of Workplace Learning, vol. 20 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1366-5626

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 17 August 2021

Sónia Maria Martins Caridade, Rosa Saavedra, Rita Ribeiro, Ana Cristina Oliveira, Manuela Santos, Iris Sofia Almeida and Cristina Soeiro

This paper aims to characterize the type of support provided to victims of violence against women and domestic violence (VAWDV) during the first lockdown, assessing the…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to characterize the type of support provided to victims of violence against women and domestic violence (VAWDV) during the first lockdown, assessing the training of professionals to use remote support (RS).

Design/methodology/approach

This cross-sectional study involves a sample of 196 support professionals, mainly women (91.8%) and who integrate the Portuguese National Support Network for victims of domestic violence (NSNVDV) (Mean age = 36.49; SD = 10.52).

Findings

Telephone emerges as the main RS communication media used in the lockdown (43.9%) and the emergency state periods (57.1%). Participants reported to have never used any social applications (41.8% vs 41.8%) or videoconference (46.4% vs 58.2%), in both periods assessed, i.e. lockdown and emergency state, respectively, and 82.7% assumed to have no training with RS to assist VAWDV victims. However, support professionals recognized several advantages in using RS such as dealing with isolation, reducing inhibition, fear and shame and in promoting the victims’ empowerment.

Research limitations/implications

Given the exploratory nature of this study, only descriptive analyzes were conducted.

Originality/value

During the COVID-19 pandemic, little is known about effective RS given by professionals to victims of VAWDV in the Portuguese context. The paper aims to add knowledge to the studied field.

Details

The Journal of Adult Protection, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1466-8203

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 3 August 2021

Clare M. Mouat, Erika Jane Edith Techera, Lies Notebaert, Meredith Blake and Renae Barker

Humanity has a weakness in how we approach the “challenge” of using outer space. This paper aims to show how the global and national frameworks that address our planetary…

Abstract

Purpose

Humanity has a weakness in how we approach the “challenge” of using outer space. This paper aims to show how the global and national frameworks that address our planetary activities and crises are inadequate for the opportunities and challenges of life in outer space.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors draw on multidisciplinary perspectives to refine an organising governance framework that better showcases the challenges and pathways needed for living and thriving in space-age. The authors prioritise two key pillars and overview the practical and social implications that space-age humanity must address.

Findings

Social sciences and humanities are vital to problematising post-war colonial legacies of governance by distinguishing the unique and overlooked challenges for thriving and working offworld and identifying progressive research agendas.

Research limitations/implications

The highlighted agenda has implications for collaborative research institutes and project design. As the vital basis for continuous learning, university-based research institutes span bodies of knowledge, experience, convention and imagination that can support vibrant and overdue debate on good governance that is out of this world.

Practical implications

This expansive approach has practical implications for the decision-making processes and subjects of spacescape, from reconciling the space commons with prospecting and human occupation to potential governance regimes that capitalise on the zeal for moving beyond merely “existing” off-world.

Social implications

Examining the governance deficit as we pursue developing spacescape frontiers is an enriching (not reductionist) agenda that deliberately troubles the existing and emerging regime for governing our scientific and imagined off-world society.

Originality/value

This framework appeals to humanity’s highest evolution in co-producing a fair and flourishing off-world governance framework (beyond replicating planetary regimes).

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 13 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

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Book part
Publication date: 4 October 2019

Emma O’Brien and Thomas M. Cooney

A decade after the 2008 global financial crisis, economic growth is returning to many OECD countries and EU states. However, a “rising tide does not lift all boats” and…

Abstract

A decade after the 2008 global financial crisis, economic growth is returning to many OECD countries and EU states. However, a “rising tide does not lift all boats” and there are currently 96.6 million people at risk of poverty and social exclusion in the EU (OECD, 2017). Addressing this concerning social situation, requires innovative approaches and it has been suggested that inclusive entrepreneurship may be part of the solution. Yet, many under-represented groups (in terms of entrepreneurial activity) face significant barriers to entrepreneurship. This research study identifies how Higher Education Institutions can utilise their multidisciplinary knowledge and expertise in partnership with government, industry and civil society to address the economic and social challenges within under-represented communities by engendering higher levels of enterprising behaviour. Emerging studies in the literature have demonstrated how some Higher Education Institutions are providing tailored and holistic enterprise support to under-represented groups in their communities. However, such initiatives are not common and there is little research on how other HEIs might replicate inclusive entrepreneurship initiatives. Through the presentation of a conceptual model, this chapter identifies how HEIs can move outside of their formal education setting and dynamically support the development of enterprising competencies and behaviours amongst people within their local communities. The findings highlight six key areas for consideration in such developments including: 1. Teaching and Learning; 2. Resources; 3. Infrastructure; 4. Multidisciplinary Approaches; 5. Stakeholders and 6. Culture. These findings highlight the requirements for impactful HEI-community engagement and suggest that HEI community engagement through entrepreneurial education is a novel way of adding value for both under-represented communities and HEIs.

Details

Management and Administration of Higher Education Institutions at Times of Change
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78973-628-1

Keywords

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