Search results

1 – 10 of 11
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Mick Strack

The purpose of this paper is to describe and critically review the new tenure arrangements that have been established to recognise Māori relationship with land (Te Urewera) and…

1382

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to describe and critically review the new tenure arrangements that have been established to recognise Māori relationship with land (Te Urewera) and river (Whanganui River), to ascribe them their own legal personality.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper describes the development of the legal arrangements in Aotearoa, New Zealand, for Treaty settlements with Māori, and documents the various forms of rights and divisions of space that are changing the face of property institutions.

Findings

The paper finds that the acknowledgement of land and nature as having their own legal status and, therefore, owned by themselves is bold and innovative, but is still not a full recognition of customary tenure. The recognition of rivers as indivisible entities is stated but not clearly implemented.

Practical implications

Māori interests and authority are now more clearly articulated, and Māori may expect to be able to engage in customary practices and restore their traditional relationships with their land more explicitly.

Social implications

The avoidance of an ownership regime has tempered public concerns about issues such as ownership of flowing water. The formalities are still being completed in the case of the Whanganui River, so the full implications are yet to be felt.

Originality/value

This is an innovative development in tenure arrangements seen by some as providing for the rights of nature, but actually responding to the rights of the Indigenous people. This article may inform others about possible models for more diverse tenure arrangements elsewhere.

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 13 August 2019

Mick Strack

This paper reviews the relationship between property and the changing coastal environment. It looks at issues around the mismatch between the protection of private property rights…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper reviews the relationship between property and the changing coastal environment. It looks at issues around the mismatch between the protection of private property rights implicit in our property law, which assumes stability and permanence, and the protection of public rights and environmental values expected of coastal land, which is increasingly vulnerable to climate change hazard. Issues of retreat from the coast, perhaps with compensation and incentives, will need to be dealt with.

Design/methodology/approach

New Zealand situations and examples are used to illustrate the conflicts between secure property rights and changing coastal land.

Findings

The effects of climate change on coastal land will be significant. This era of environmental degradation and climate change will require a significant re-ordering of property law. Changes in coastal land will require property owners to adapt their use and occupation of the coastal zone, if necessary by retreating. Similarly, local authorities will need to be proactive in planning for coastal land changes.

Social implications

Property will need to be re-imagined to support public and environmental goals for the coast.

Originality/value

This paper extends other discussions about how property law and the protection of property rights is a barrier to implementing climate change responses.

Details

Journal of Property, Planning and Environmental Law, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2514-9407

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Francis Sheridan King

268

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Law in the Built Environment, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-1450

Article
Publication date: 23 November 2021

S. Umit Kucuk and Samil A. Aledin

This study aims to investigate a neglected phenomenon, conceptualized as “brand-bullying.” The study aims at defining the brand bullying phenomena with adolescents who are…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate a neglected phenomenon, conceptualized as “brand-bullying.” The study aims at defining the brand bullying phenomena with adolescents who are actively experiencing brand bullying. Potential impacts of brand bullying experience on adult consumption behaviors are also investigated.

Design/methodology/approach

This paper provides a literature review of brand bullying and uses two qualitative analyses with adolescent and adult consumers through face-to-face interviews.

Findings

Study-1 found five different styles of brand bullying behavior with adolescents. Study-2’s findings revealed four distinct styles of brand bullying coping behaviors in adulthood. Study-2 also found that brand-bullying’s negative effects could continue after the bullying process is long over and has the potential to cause consumer brand hate (in the form of brand avoidance and disgust) and can cause conspicuous consumption patterns in adulthood in the future. The study further reports that neither the economically unfortunate nor the wealthy are immune to brand bullying.

Originality/value

This is the first study to investigate the brand bullying concept and its expression among adolescents, as well as its impact on adult consumption behaviors. The study is among the first to report the negative impact of brand bullying on adult consumer behaviors and consumption patterns in adulthood from a consumer psychology perspective.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 25 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 29 June 2020

J. Lukas Thürmer, Maik Bieleke, Frank Wieber and Peter M. Gollwitzer

This study aims to take a dual-process perspective and argues that peer influence on increasing impulse buying may also operate automatically. If-then plans, which can automate…

7448

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to take a dual-process perspective and argues that peer influence on increasing impulse buying may also operate automatically. If-then plans, which can automate action control, may, thus, help regulate peer influence. This research extends existing literature explicating the deliberate influence of social norms.

Design/methodology/approach

Study 1 (N = 120) obtained causal evidence that forming an implementation intention (i.e. an if-then plan designed to automate action control) reduces peer impact on impulse buying in a laboratory experiment with young adults (students) selecting food items. Study 2 (N = 686) obtained correlational evidence for the role of norms, automaticity and implementation intentions in impulse buying using a large sample of high-school adolescents working on a vignette about clothes-shopping.

Findings

If-then plans reduced impulse purchases in the laboratory (Study 1). Both reported deliberation on peer norms and the reported automaticity of shopping with peers predicted impulse buying but an implementation intention to be thriftily reduced these links (Study 2).

Research limitations/implications

This research highlights the role of automatic social processes in problematic consumer behaviour. Promising field studies and neuropsychological experiments are discussed.

Practical implications

Young consumers can gain control over automatic peer influence by using if-then plans, thereby reducing impulse buying.

Originality/value

This research helps understand new precursors of impulse buying in understudied European samples of young consumers.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 54 no. 9
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 23 August 2021

Diego Alvarado-Karste and Blair Kidwell

This study aims to demonstrate that feelings of resentment, fueled by perceptions of injustice, underlie the formation of rivalries. Further, this study analyzes how consumers…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to demonstrate that feelings of resentment, fueled by perceptions of injustice, underlie the formation of rivalries. Further, this study analyzes how consumers evaluate the two brands that participate in a rivalry relationship.

Design/methodology/approach

The research uses four experiments. Study 1 uses two conditions to test whether injustice predicts inter-personal rivalries through resentment. Study 2 uses a one-factor design with three levels (resentment vs contempt vs control) to examine the underlying mechanism of resentment on the formation of a rivalry. Study 3 analyzes the effect of brand rivalries on consumers’ brand attitudes. Study 4 uses a 2 (Temporal-focus: past vs future) × 2 (competitive relationship: resentment vs control) between-subjects experimental design, to test the moderating effects of temporal-focus on consumer brand rivalry perceptions. This experiment replicates the effects of brand rivalries on consumer brand attitudes.

Findings

Rivalries have an essential emotional component – resentment – that is fueled by injustice and leads consumers to form more favorable attitudes toward the brand that consumers perceive is treated unfairly (target brand) and more unfavorable attitudes toward the brand that is perceived to treat the other brand unfairly (the rival brand). A future-focused mindset attenuates consumer perceptions of brand rivalries, whereas a past-focused mindset enhances these effects.

Originality/value

Prior research has failed to identify the emotional components of rivalries and their effects on consumer choices. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first study that reveals how attitudes change when consumers are exposed to a brand rivalry.

Details

Journal of Product & Brand Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1061-0421

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 3 April 2018

Roger Tourangeau

This paper aims to examine the cognitive processes involved in answering survey questions. It also briefly discusses how the cognitive viewpoint has been challenged by other…

1233

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to examine the cognitive processes involved in answering survey questions. It also briefly discusses how the cognitive viewpoint has been challenged by other approaches (such as conversational analysis).

Design/methodology/approach

The paper reviews the major components of the response process and summarizes work examining how each of these components can contribute to measurement errors in surveys.

Findings

The Cognitive Aspects of Survey Methodology (CASM) model of the survey response process is still generating useful research, but both the satisficing model and the conversational approach provide useful supplements, emphasizing motivational and social sources of error neglected in the CASM approach.

Originality/value

The paper provides an introduction to the cognitive processes underlying survey responses and how these processes can explain why survey responses may be inaccurate.

Details

Quality Assurance in Education, vol. 26 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0968-4883

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 21 November 2023

Jean-François Toti and Andrea Milena Sánchez Romero

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of subjective ambivalence on ethical consumption behaviors and the role of ethical claims in reducing feelings of ambivalence…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine the effect of subjective ambivalence on ethical consumption behaviors and the role of ethical claims in reducing feelings of ambivalence toward buying ethical products.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors conducted two studies. In study 1, the authors carried out an online survey with a sample of 230 French consumers. The authors applied structural equation modeling with Amos to test the relationships among skepticism, ambivalence and ethical consumption behaviors. Study 2 is an experimental design in which the authors manipulated ethical claims (low – few ethical arguments vs. high – many ethical arguments) in advertising (176 French panelists). The authors tested the relationships among consumer ethical sensitivity, perceived brand ethicality, skepticism, ambivalence and intention to purchase an ethical product, depending on ethical claims in advertising.

Findings

Study 1 shows that skepticism toward advertising of ethical products amplifies feelings of ambivalence and that ambivalence reduces consumers’ willingness to adopt ethical consumption behaviors. Study 2 shows that strong claims in advertising of ethical products reduce skepticism toward advertising of ethical products and feelings of ambivalence toward buying an ethical product through perceived brand ethicality, with consumers’ ethical sensitivity positively moderating these relationships.

Research limitations/implications

The two studies explore only one form of ambivalence (i.e. subjective), and the experimental study focuses on a single category of products.

Practical implications

The findings highlight the difficulties in promoting ethical products. Consumers need to know if a product is “really” ethical, as they may feel ambivalent toward that product. This paper shows that strong ethical claims in advertising ethical products significantly help to overcome this barrier.

Originality/value

Based on attribution theory and persuasion models, this research reveals how ethical claims in advertising affect feelings of ambivalence, which negatively influence consumers’ willingness to adopt ethical consumption. In addition, it follows a holistic approach to ethical consumption behaviors to explore consumers’ ambivalence.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 57 no. 12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 25 June 2021

Xuan Hau Doan, Trung Thanh Le, Cong Doanh Duong, Thi Phuong Linh Nguyen, Duc Dung Tran and Thi Phuong Hien Tran

This study aims to integrate predictions from clinical psychology and UPPS impulsivity with the theory of planned behaviors (TPB) to draw a conceptual framework and test the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to integrate predictions from clinical psychology and UPPS impulsivity with the theory of planned behaviors (TPB) to draw a conceptual framework and test the prediction that attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms, impulsivity would contribute to the prediction of the reasoned cognitive process of entrepreneurship over and above key predictors from an extended TPB model.

Design/methodology/approach

This study utilized a sample of 2,482 students from 14 universities/institutes in Vietnam; confirmatory factor analysis was employed to test the validity and reliability. Then, regression analysis with PROCESS macro approach (5,000 bootstrap sample and 95% confidence interval) was employed to estimate the association paths and multiple mediators.

Findings

The study reveals that ADHD symptoms and impulsivity substantially contribute to the exploration of an entrepreneurial intention throughout TPB predictors, with those higher in ADHD symptoms and impulsivity having higher intentions to engage in business venturing. Moreover, UPPS impulsiveness might valuably be incorporated with TPB predictors while predicting behaviors that are often examined as the process of rational cognitive strategies business venturing.

Practical implications

This study showed that a start-up business can be seen as a career choice for students who exhibit extensive ADHD symptoms to use their talents effectively, thus contributing to creating value for society and improving personal well-being.

Originality/value

This article stood to make contributions to entrepreneurship literature by investigating the effects of ADHD symptoms, four impulsivity traits on an entrepreneurial intention via three precursors in TPB, including attitude toward entrepreneurship, subjective norms and perceived behavioral control.

Details

Asia-Pacific Journal of Business Administration, vol. 13 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1757-4323

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 30 September 2019

Sharad Gupta and Harsh V. Verma

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of mindfulness meditation sessions on students of higher education in terms of their mindfulness, mindful consumption…

1657

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to investigate the effect of mindfulness meditation sessions on students of higher education in terms of their mindfulness, mindful consumption behavior and life satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Participants of research were higher education students. The research included two studies. The first (screener) study endorsed that mindfulness was higher in students with higher mindfulness meditation frequency. The second study used difference-in-differences experimental design using a treatment and a control group. These groups participated in pre and post-treatment surveys. The treatment was given as guided short mindfulness meditation sessions as suggested by mindfulness guru – Dr Jon Kabat-Zinn. The treatment group received these sessions at the end of regular subject classes for two months.

Findings

The experiment revealed that mindfulness, mindful consumption and life satisfaction change significantly in the treatment group after treatment as compared to the control group.

Research limitations/implications

Limitations of the study included sample size and attrition. In total, 149 students participated in the screener study. In total, 94 students were given pre-treatment survey as per research design and 80 participated in post-treatment survey.

Practical implications

This experiment demonstrated that important traits and behavior like life satisfaction and mindful consumption behavior of higher education students can be improved significantly. The effectiveness of guided short mindfulness sessions, conducted in the classroom environment, was also confirmed.

Social implications

The inclusion of mindfulness in the regular curriculum by policy makers would benefit students, faculty members and overall quality of learning environment.

Originality/value

Though previous researches have separately investigated relationships of mindfulness with life satisfaction, there is a lack of research to show association of mindfulness, mindful consumption and life satisfaction.

Details

Journal of Applied Research in Higher Education, vol. 12 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2050-7003

Keywords

1 – 10 of 11