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Book part
Publication date: 7 April 2015

The Gold Coast has long been one of Australia’s iconic destinations. Rapid development by entrepreneurs in the 1960s saw the former coastal fishing and surfing town grow…

Abstract

The Gold Coast has long been one of Australia’s iconic destinations. Rapid development by entrepreneurs in the 1960s saw the former coastal fishing and surfing town grow quickly into a city. After many decades of success, market fluctuations and changing consumer patterns the Gold Coast has stagnated as a destination. This case discusses the history of tourism on the Gold Coast and provides a context to some of the modern governance challenges faced by the destination. The findings of an empirical study of social network analysis identify various power relationships in the destination’s governance structure.

Details

Contemporary Destination Governance: A Case Study Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-113-7

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Book part
Publication date: 5 August 2019

Kathleen M. Sullivan

This chapter traces an emerging place-based governance region and identity centered on the California Current large marine ecosystem, which takes in the states of Oregon…

Abstract

This chapter traces an emerging place-based governance region and identity centered on the California Current large marine ecosystem, which takes in the states of Oregon, Washington, California, First Nations, and the federal government branches and agencies responsible for west coast ocean governance. These efforts have been fostered by Executive Orders aiming to coordinate the work of federal agencies responsible for governing the ocean and have been realized in the human and ocean data networks, and working forums of government representatives from the state, federal, and First Nations governments. My analysis brings science and technology studies, law and society studies, and anthropological ethnographic practice into conversation through an exploration of the bureaucratic socialities that are challenged with grappling with the social and ethical ramifications of unpredictable ocean conditions due to impending climate change and increased human uses.

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Studies in Law, Politics, and Society
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-83867-058-0

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Article
Publication date: 5 May 2015

Karine Dupre and Bixia Xu

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between culture-based tourism development and cultural sustainability in the established tourism destination of Gold…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to study the relationship between culture-based tourism development and cultural sustainability in the established tourism destination of Gold Coast, Australia. It seeks to contribute to the debate on local development and tourism through evaluating the development of the newly-born Gold Coast Chinatown.

Design/methodology/approach

Two types of analysis were developed for this study. The first one aims at assessing the general features of the case study site. It was done by the urban analysis of the precinct, the count of the shops associated with the identification of their function (e.g. retail, services, etc.), street visual survey, and the assessment of ethnic expression/representations. The second analysis aims at assessing place-attachment, development impacts and cultural attitude. It was done by questionnaire surveys.

Findings

The analysis evidences mainly two findings. First, tradition, authenticity or ethnicity are not perceived as key drivers, and tangible pre-requisites do not appear as a priority for a culture-based tourism development. Second, correlation studies show the longer the length of residence the higher is the attitude towards positive perceived economic impacts and positive cultural attitudes. It is the opposite of what is usually found in literature review. As such, it challenges the concept of cultural sustainability, and helps us to reconsider the weight of the evaluative factors of community attachment, development impact and cultural attitude in tourism development.

Originality/value

The recent creation of the Gold Coast Chinatown not only raises the question of the rationale of what is usually recognised as a community-based settlement, hence its cultural foundation and the legitimacy of transfer of cultural models, but also the processes at stake between cultural sustainability and tourism development. To the knowledge, no publication exists on this case study.

Details

International Tourism Studies Association, vol. 1 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2056-5607

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Article
Publication date: 2 March 2015

Jamila Abodeeb, Erica Wilson and Brent Moyle

This paper aims to explore how destination image can be shaped, created and crafted, from an induced-source, supply-side perspective to better cater to Arab visitors…

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore how destination image can be shaped, created and crafted, from an induced-source, supply-side perspective to better cater to Arab visitors, drawing on empirical research conducted on the Gold Coast, Australia.

Design/methodology/approach

Two sequential stages of research were implemented. The first stage conducted an analysis of websites to compare and contrast the image of the Gold Coast projected with the image perceived by Arab visitors. The second stage conducted semi-structured interviews with professionals from two destination marketing organisations (DMOs) directly responsible for marketing the Gold Coast to Arab visitors.

Findings

Key findings indicate that the DMOs sought to portray a strong destination brand to Arab visitors, specifically around its current branding of “Gold Coast: Famous for Fun”. The Gold Coast has highly evolved strategies to target Arab visitors, including productive working relationships between DMOs and strategic partnerships with tourism organisations in the Arab world. However, analysis of websites revealed some incongruence between core attractions. Arab websites emphasise the beach more than do the Australian, state and local DMOs, and entertainment did not rate as highly as the need for beaches, shopping and accommodation.

Research limitations/implications

Importantly, this research highlights the need for DMOs to clearly understand the needs of Arab visitors and integrating such information into targeted marketing campaigns aligned with the core destination brand.

Originality/value

The contribution of this research is in providing a more nuanced understanding of the importance of using culture as a key segmentation tool not only to help attract more tourists but to assist DMOs to understand the special needs of various cultures in the destination.

Details

International Journal of Culture, Tourism and Hospitality Research, vol. 9 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1750-6182

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Book part
Publication date: 7 April 2015

The case study on Surfers Paradise, Gold Coast, examines a local-level example of governance. Surfers Paradise is the literal and metaphorical heart of the Gold Coast and…

Abstract

The case study on Surfers Paradise, Gold Coast, examines a local-level example of governance. Surfers Paradise is the literal and metaphorical heart of the Gold Coast and one of Queensland’s most visited tourist precincts. Surfers Paradise has evolved through many iterations of the market from Australian surfers in the 1960s, to high-end Japanese tourists in the 1980s and to an affordable family-friendly destination today. There has also been an evolution of the Schoolies Week festival, an end of high school celebration, which has at times tarnished the reputation of the precinct. Surfers Paradise presents a case of destination management that caters to numerous stakeholders including at times highly disparate tourist segments.

Details

Contemporary Destination Governance: A Case Study Approach
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78350-113-7

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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1974

P. Boerjan

The marketing strategy begins with the identification of human needs and discharges into the application of a combination of marketing variables (product, price…

Abstract

The marketing strategy begins with the identification of human needs and discharges into the application of a combination of marketing variables (product, price, distribution, sales promotion and publicity). Motivations for buying a tourist product in an affluent society are not only the reflection of a person's physical needs. They also arise from social‐psychological needs. With the ‘erosion of traditional class‐determined patterns of behavior’, even the usual social‐class variables are losing their importance in explaining buying behavior.

Details

The Tourist Review, vol. 29 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0251-3102

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Article
Publication date: 16 November 2015

Susanne Fredholm

With specific focus on sustainable development of the built environment in Cape Coast, Ghana, the purpose of this paper is to examine practical and conceptual barriers for…

Abstract

Purpose

With specific focus on sustainable development of the built environment in Cape Coast, Ghana, the purpose of this paper is to examine practical and conceptual barriers for local planning authorities advancing international outreach programmes based on a global discourse on heritage and heritage management.

Design/methodology/approach

A discourse analysis was conducted on documents and programmes produced by international organisations and local planning authorities since 2000. Further qualitative data collection methods included 25 semi-structured interviews, literature and media review and on-site observations.

Findings

The study shows that the dominant global discourse on heritage management being interconnected with tourism development is adopted by local planning authorities. However, the requirements to advance initiated urban redevelopment projects are neither adapted to the economic realities nor institutional capabilities of the local planning system. Instead of adjusting specific Ghanaian notions of heritage or local forms of heritage organisations, negotiating the discourse is potentially a more sustainable approach.

Practical implications

The findings reveal important implications necessary to address from sustainable development perspective. The study can help practitioners to develop strategies based on local African planning contexts rather than western discourses on best practice.

Originality/value

This study discusses the impact of an Authorised Heritage Discourse on local planning of the built environment, and the need to rescale and broaden the scope of such discourses to other levels than the dominating national/global.

Details

Journal of Cultural Heritage Management and Sustainable Development, vol. 5 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2044-1266

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 1994

Graham Brown and Shane Raedler

The Gold Coast is Australia′s premier tourist destination, attractingover 2,500,000 visitors annually. Discusses the characteristics of thisrapidly growing region and…

Abstract

The Gold Coast is Australia′s premier tourist destination, attracting over 2,500,000 visitors annually. Discusses the characteristics of this rapidly growing region and examines recent tourism trends such as the development of international hotels. After analysing factors which are likely to shape the future prospects of the hotel sector, suggests that, despite increased occupancy rates, the competitive environment may limit the scope for rate increases.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 6 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 19 January 2015

Ping Yung and Kieran Rafferty

– The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the statutory adjudication legislation in Western Australia against its stated aims.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the effectiveness of the statutory adjudication legislation in Western Australia against its stated aims.

Design/methodology/approach

The four objectives of the Western Australia Construction Contracts Act 2004 were identified. For each objective a number of criteria has been devised. In total, 22 registered adjudicators were interviewed, representing 28 per cent of all adjudicators in Western Australia. The interviewees were divided into two groups, one with legal background (being both lawyer and adjudicator), the other without (construction professionals). They were asked to evaluate the criteria against a five-point Likert scale in addition to open ended comments. Mann-Whitney U tests were used to examine whether there were significant differences between the two groups. Annual reports of Building Commissioner, database of the WA State Administrative Tribunal and some law cases were also referred to.

Findings

It is found that the West Coast Model is fair to both parties, the adjudications are generally completed speedily according to the prescribed timeframe, and they have been conducted in various levels of formalities. Adjudications are very cost effective for larger claims. However, they are not so for smaller claims. The increasing uptake rate shows that adjudication is getting more popular, while the low appeal rate shows that decisions on dismissal are fair.

Research limitations/implications

The adjudicators’ opinions are only part of the overall picture and that more research on this topic needs to be done.

Originality/value

There have been two distinct legislative models in Australia, commonly known as East Coast Model and West Coast Model. A number of authors have called for a national dual model incorporating both current models. However, it might be too early to discuss the national dual model when there have been very few evaluations on the West Coast Model and among the few there have been problems in the research design. This paper seeks to bridge the gap by evaluating the West Coast Model against its stated aims.

Details

Engineering, Construction and Architectural Management, vol. 22 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0969-9988

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Article
Publication date: 2 October 2017

Dominic Hess, Roger Moser and Gopalakrishnan Narayanamurthy

The purpose of this paper is to identify and understand the obstacles and drivers of financial investors while deciding upon investment opportunities in emerging markets.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to identify and understand the obstacles and drivers of financial investors while deciding upon investment opportunities in emerging markets.

Design/methodology/approach

Relevant factors for financial investors in emerging markets were identified through a literature review and a series of expert interviews. Identified factors were broadly grouped into three categories, namely, microeconomic aspects, macroeconomic aspects, and aspects of the functionality of the local banking system. Finally, an expert panel (Delphi) technique is used to validate the findings in cocoa industry in Ivory Coast.

Findings

A decision-making framework that enables the evaluation of the attractiveness of an industry in emerging market from a financial investor perspective is developed and its application is demonstrated on the cocoa industry in Ivory Coast. Probability and consensus of the projections for the individual decision elements are tabulated along with the insights into both encouraging and discouraging aspects.

Research limitations/implications

Current study is a timely contribution to the call for papers in the research literature to develop frameworks that are contextualized in emerging markets. Similar to any other qualitative study, this study lacks the generalizability of results. But, the framework developed can act as a starting point toward the generalizability of the findings in future.

Practical implications

Decision elements identified in this study can act as a checklist for financial investors and top management to choose the elements that are relevant to the investment problem being dealt by them. Also, the study can act as a handy demonstration to practitioners for applying the framework using expert panel.

Social implications

A major challenge of the investment environment in emerging market is the non-availability of quality information on the potential investment opportunities. In this study, the authors suggest a framework to overcome this information asymmetry challenge and expect it to promote financial investments in emerging economies which in turn will improve the quality of life of people in these economies.

Originality/value

First study to present an approach to help financial investors to conduct profound evaluation and gain more in-depth insights into the future investment opportunity attractiveness of a particular industry in an emerging market.

Details

World Journal of Science, Technology and Sustainable Development, vol. 14 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2042-5945

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