Search results

1 – 10 of 113
To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 18 September 2020

Joëlle Vanhamme, Adam Lindgreen and Michael Beverland

This study aims to explore surprising gifts received and given by close relations to identify the variables involved in creating surprising gifts. The analysis of the…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to explore surprising gifts received and given by close relations to identify the variables involved in creating surprising gifts. The analysis of the viewpoints of the giver and the recipient, reflecting their profiles, leads to recommendations for retailers.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory, small-scale, open-ended questionnaire (48 respondents) produces 43 (38) accounts of surprising gifts given (received), informed further by in-depth interviews (eight informants, both givers and recipients of surprising gifts).

Findings

This study identifies and elaborates on the variables (why, when, what, where, who and how, and their combinations) that define surprising gift giving, from both giver and recipient perspectives. The findings indicate a paradox: even if givers or recipients prefer a surprising gift, they might give or wish for an unsurprising gift to avoid disappointment.

Research limitations/implications

Further research should confirm the findings using representative samples. Moreover, gender differences in surprising gift giving should be investigated further. Finally, the exact characteristics and properties that make common objects potential candidates for successful surprising gifts should be studied further.

Practical implications

The discussion has relevant implications for manufacturers and retailers. For example, if recipients are surprised, happy and satisfied, they likely exhibit higher brand recall. The recipient’s (happy versus not happy) emotions also have spillover effects on the giver’s. Thus, retailers should provide assistance in the store and advertise their salespeople as experts who can offer advice about selecting appropriate gifts. The exact characteristics and properties that make common objects potential candidates for successful surprising gifts should be studied further.

Originality/value

The systematic account of all six variables, not previously analyzed in the literature, provides rich insights into surprising gift giving. The discussion of the study of givers and recipients supplements these insights.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 55 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 9 October 2018

Karen V. Fernandez and Michael B. Beverland

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the material nature of legacy technology makes its users passionately prefer it over its digital alternatives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to examine how the material nature of legacy technology makes its users passionately prefer it over its digital alternatives.

Design/methodology/approach

This ethnographic study uses data from 26 in-depth interviews with vinyl collectors, augmented with longitudinal participant–observation of vinyl collecting and music store events.

Findings

The findings reveal how the physicality of vinyl facilitates the passionate relationships (with music, the vinyl as performative object and other people) that make vinyl so significant in vinyl users’ lives.

Research limitations/implications

As this study examines a single research context (vinyl) from the perspective of participants from three developed, Anglophone nations, its key theoretical contributions should be examined in other technological contexts and other cultures.

Practical implications

The findings imply that miniturisation and automation have lower limits for some products, material attributes should be added to digitised products and that legacy technology products could be usually be reframed as tools of authentic self-expression.

Originality/value

This study explains what can happen beyond the top of the “S” curve in the Technology Acceptance Model, furthering our understanding of consumers’ reactions to the proliferation of digital technology in their lives.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 53 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2006

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Downloads
3009

Abstract

Purpose

Reviews the latest management developments across the globe and pinpoints practical implications from cutting‐edge research and case studies.

Design/methodology/approach

This briefing is prepared by an independent writer who adds their own impartial comments and places the articles in context.

Findings

Followers of popular music still marvel at Madonna's reinvention after 20 years of changing musical styles, personas and even fan bases. Every new album (if that word still has currency in musical circles) brought a new look and a new sound embracing some emerging trend not yet in the mainstream. In the process, the “material girl” has embraced spirituality, the American icon become an English country lady – well almost!

Practical implications

Provides strategic insights and practical thinking that have influenced some of the world's leading organizations.

Originality/value

The briefing saves busy executives and researchers hours of reading time by selecting only the very best, most pertinent information and presenting it in a condensed and easy‐to‐digest format.

Details

Strategic Direction, vol. 22 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0258-0543

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 January 1999

Michael Beverland

Despite the important role of salespeople in forming relationships with customers, little research has been carried out in this area. Based upon a series of interviews and…

Abstract

Despite the important role of salespeople in forming relationships with customers, little research has been carried out in this area. Based upon a series of interviews and a large‐scale survey of salespeople in the New Zealand wine industry this paper argues that the role of salespeople is vital in forming long‐term relationships with retailers and distributors. The paper examines, in detail, strategies used by salespeople to create and maintain relationships, avoid the loss of key accounts and the support that an organisation can provide to assist salespeople in this area. Results highlight the importance of constant calls, communication, product support and partnering in forming relationships with customers.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 11 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Michael Beverland, Julie Napoli and Raisa Yakimova

The paper seeks to provide a framework identifying key attributes that business marketers can use to build a strong brand identity.

Downloads
17979

Abstract

Purpose

The paper seeks to provide a framework identifying key attributes that business marketers can use to build a strong brand identity.

Design/methodology/approach

The article is theoretical with case examples.

Findings

Drawing upon the business marketing offer, five potential strategies for building brands in business markets are outlined.

Practical implications

The paper identifies a contingent approach to brand identity in business markets.

Originality/value

This is the first paper to identify a relationship between positioning, the buying process and brand identity in business markets.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 October 2006

Michael Beverland, Marion Steel and G. Peter Dapiran

Despite the necessity of close integration between marketing and sales, managers report less than satisfactory results in this area. This paper aims to examine what keeps…

Downloads
3732

Abstract

Purpose

Despite the necessity of close integration between marketing and sales, managers report less than satisfactory results in this area. This paper aims to examine what keeps the two functions apart. It proposes going beyond surface level behavior to examine the different sub‐cultural mental frames that characterize the two functions.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 44 salespeople and marketers across four different organizations in different industries were interviewed.

Findings

The research finds that conflicts between marketing and sales are driven by differences in beliefs about the valid scope and focus of activity, time focus, valid sources of knowledge, differences in perceived status, and the relationship to the business environment.

Practical implications

Managers need to focus on removing implied status barriers between sales and marketing, provide sales with a strategic voice, and attend to structural issues that drive the two functions apart.

Originality/value

Research on the sales‐marketing interface remains scarce. The paper examines this from a cultural point of view and identifies a number of basic cultural frames that explain behavioral differences between the two functions. Critically, it also identifies significant points of difference on which to build greater understanding between the two functions.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 21 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 February 2000

Michael Beverland

Wine tourism has gained increased coverage in the last 4–5 years. Recognised as an effective aid to distribution and brand building, both industry and academia have…

Abstract

Wine tourism has gained increased coverage in the last 4–5 years. Recognised as an effective aid to distribution and brand building, both industry and academia have developed research and strategies for increasing the effectiveness of how wineries manage wine tourism. This paper synthesises the findings from two recent conferences and argues that in order to be successful wineries will need to pay more attention to strategies that attract repeat visitors. This requires a relationship marketing strategy.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 12 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 1 March 2002

Michael Beverland

Faced with the prospect of over supply, wine exporters are increasingly focused on establishing new markets, particularly in Asia. Recent papers have suggested that…

Abstract

Faced with the prospect of over supply, wine exporters are increasingly focused on establishing new markets, particularly in Asia. Recent papers have suggested that relationship‐marketing approaches may be the most successful for establishing wine sales in these markets. Despite many models, evidence on the content and implementation of relationship marketing remains scarce. This research reports on the experience of one firm in Asia, and identifies the link between cultural values and the need for relationship based strategies for wine exporters to Asia. Tactical implications for wine markets are also explored.

Details

International Journal of Wine Marketing, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0954-7541

Keywords

Content available
Article
Publication date: 28 August 2007

Michael B. Beverland

Downloads
1171

Abstract

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 22 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

To view the access options for this content please click here
Article
Publication date: 16 November 2010

Sonia Dickinson‐Delaporte, Michael Beverland and Adam Lindgreen

Managing the corporate reputation of hybrid firms (organizations that act commercially to pursue social agendas) involves particular challenges because of competing…

Downloads
4568

Abstract

Purpose

Managing the corporate reputation of hybrid firms (organizations that act commercially to pursue social agendas) involves particular challenges because of competing stakeholder interests. With reference to the Trappist beer market, the paper seeks to identify the value of message ambiguity in reducing stakeholder tension, while simultaneously achieving a clear market positioning.

Design/methodology/approach

In total, 25 in‐depth interviews were conducted with brand marketers, owners, channel buyers, industry representatives and consumers.

Findings

The findings demonstrate how ambiguous communications minimize tension between stakeholders. One form of ambiguous message strategy is identified – i.e. the deliberate use of “authenticity” as a positioning device. This positioning allows stakeholders to ascribe conflicting meanings to the Trappist brand, resulting in increased reputation and decreased stakeholder tension.

Research limitations/implications

The use of authenticity and message ambiguity represents one means of balancing stakeholder interests, while achieving a clear market position. The paper believes the findings are particularly relevant for social marketers and managers of highly symbolic brands.

Originality/value

Marketers can reduce stakeholder conflict through the use of brand images that emphasize normative as opposed to performance‐based commitments. Such commitments need to be broad enough to allow different stakeholders to ascribe their own meaning to the brand without diminishing the strength of the firm's market position.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 44 no. 11/12
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

Keywords

1 – 10 of 113