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Article
Publication date: 1 March 1995

Judith Overmier and Rhonda Harris Taylor

Introduces librarians to popular culture studies and emphasizes the importance of collection development of popular culture materials, both primary and secondary. Provides…

Abstract

Introduces librarians to popular culture studies and emphasizes the importance of collection development of popular culture materials, both primary and secondary. Provides strategies and identifies resources that can facilitate such collection development.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 14 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 January 1983

Barbara B. Moran

Although interest in the study of popular culture on the university and college level has increased greatly since the 1960s, there has been little written to date about…

Abstract

Although interest in the study of popular culture on the university and college level has increased greatly since the 1960s, there has been little written to date about collection development in this field. What has been written has typically described the collection development activities in particular academic libraries instead of attempting to address the topic generally. The lack of general guidelines for collection building in this area of study is not surprising. In the first place, popular culture is a relative newcomer to the academic scene with most programs and courses instituted in the last decade. Secondly, popular culture is a broad, diverse field of study with its researchers typically scattered throughout many of the more traditional departments of the university. As a result, the demands on the library have been less focused than if they had been coming from one clearly defined academic department.

Details

Collection Building, vol. 5 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0160-4953

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Article
Publication date: 1 August 2006

Roblyn Simeon

To investigate the degree to which products, images, and activities associated with a popular culture supports and sustains brands associated with that culture, with…

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4812

Abstract

Purpose

To investigate the degree to which products, images, and activities associated with a popular culture supports and sustains brands associated with that culture, with particular reference to global Japanese brands.

Design/methodology/approach

A questionnaire‐based survey of 638 respondents in and around San Francisco. Only a third were American, the remainder originating from several countries in Europe, South America and Asia. Roughly four fifths were under 35 years of age, and the gender balance reflected the general population. Questions gathered data relevant to four specific research propositions, which were interpreted by regression analysis.

Findings

Results provided good support for two research propositions, that that a wider range of experience of the manifestations of Japanese popular culture would enhance the tendency to prefer related brands, and that a favourable view of the national culture would increase the likelihood of a positive orientation to brands associated with it. They were equivocal with respect to the other two, that positive views of the culture would transfer to brands associated with it, and that age would influence receptiveness to cultural influences.

Research limitations/implications

An exploratory study, in a single location, of the association between one national culture and its exported brands. The underpinning model suggests directions for future research into an important phenomenon.

Practical implications

Relating brands closely to national cultures promises synergy in marketing strategy, provided plans are informed by appropriate marketing intelligence.

Originality/value

Offers potentially valuable insights into branding, country‐of‐origin effects, and the influence of an overt national culture on acceptance of its internationally marketed brands.

Details

Marketing Intelligence & Planning, vol. 24 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0263-4503

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2013

Soonkwan Hong and Chang‐Ho Kim

The purpose of this study is to present a theoretical framework to demythologize Asian consumers' cultural and ideological narratives in relation to the newly emerging…

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4018

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study is to present a theoretical framework to demythologize Asian consumers' cultural and ideological narratives in relation to the newly emerging popular culture developed in Korea, widely known as “Korean wave.” In addition, methodological considerations for the understudied consumption phenomenon are also discussed.

Design/methodology/approach

From the extant literature on popular culture and globalization, a theoretical overview of Korean popular culture (KPC) is provided. Subsequently, a condensed presentation of netnography employing critical discourse analysis (CDA) is provided.

Findings

A netnography fused with CDA suggests a reflexive process in which a range of sociocultural tensions in the globalization process of KPC dynamically hybridize and transform into new cultural tastes in respective cultures.

Research limitations/implications

Cultural branding can be revisited, as the new discourse generated in Asia envisions new entries into the global brandscape. Moreover, this endeavor helps explicate how a globalized trend is replaced with another through a paradoxical discursive process.

Originality/value

As this article discusses popular culture as a product to be consumed just as are other tangible products, it assists researchers in visualizing and theorizing about the globalization process of incorporeal, cultural products. The application of discursively enriched netnography facilitates pertinent analysis and ultimately theory‐building.

Details

Qualitative Market Research: An International Journal, vol. 16 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1352-2752

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Article
Publication date: 17 June 2021

Jonida Carungu and Matteo Molinari

This paper explores the stereotype of the accountant in Florentine medieval popular culture based on literary works and from a historical perspective. It aims to highlight…

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94

Abstract

Purpose

This paper explores the stereotype of the accountant in Florentine medieval popular culture based on literary works and from a historical perspective. It aims to highlight how stereotypes change with time and represent the cultural and historical evolution of a society. This research challenges Miley and Read (2012), who stated that the foundation of the stereotype was in Commedia dell'arte, an Italian form of improvisational theatre commenced in the 15th century.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors applied a qualitative research method to examine the accountant from a medieval popular culture perspective. The analysis consists of two phases: (1) categorisation of the accountant stereotype based on accounting history literature and (2) thematic analysis of The Divine Comedy (1307–1313) and The Decameron (1348–1351). The authors explored a synchronic perspective of historical investigation through a “cross-author” comparison, identifying Dante Alighieri as the first key author of medieval popular culture. During his imaginary journey through The Divine Comedy, Dante describes the social, political and economic context of the Florentine people of the 14th century. Then, with its various folkloristic elements, The Decameron of Giovanni Boccaccio becomes the “manifesto” of the popular culture in the Florentine medieval times.

Findings

This study shows the change of the accountant stereotype from the medieval age to the Renaissance. The Divine Comedy mainly connotes a negative accountant stereotype. The 14th century's Florentine gentlemen (“i galantuomini”) are apparently positive characters, with an ordered and clean aspect, but they are accused of being usurers. Dante Alighieri pictures the accountant as a “servant of capitalism”, “dishonest person, excessively fixated with money”, “villain and evil” and “excessively rational”. Giovanni Boccaccio mainly portrays a positive accountant stereotype. The accountant is increasingly more reliable, and this “commercial man” takes a more prestigious role in the society. In The Decameron, the accountant is depicted as a “hero”, “gentleman”, “family-oriented person with a high level of work commitment” and “colourful persona, warm, and emotional”. Overall, the authors provided new evidence on the existence of the accountant stereotype in the Florentine medieval popular.

Originality/value

This study engages with accounting history literature accountants' stereotypes in an unexplored context and time period, providing a base for comparative international research on accounting stereotypes and popular culture. Additionally, it addresses the need for further research on the accountant stereotype based on literary works and from a historical perspective. Therefore, this research also expands the New Accounting History (NAH) literature, focussing on the investigation of the accountant stereotype connotations in the 14th century.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 5 June 2019

Erin M. Casey and Jay H. Casey

Development of economic understandings fosters the growth of democratic citizenship competencies. Elements of popular culture should be recognized for the influence they…

Abstract

Purpose

Development of economic understandings fosters the growth of democratic citizenship competencies. Elements of popular culture should be recognized for the influence they have on children’s economic decisions. Children should learn of the concept of popular culture to regulate its effect on their habits and understand how it has shaped the lives of people throughout history. The paper aims to discuss these issues.

Design/methodology/approach

Using a C3 inquiry investigation, this study explored if students from fifth grade to kindergarten could be engaged in higher-level thinking about economic concepts through the analysis of elements of popular culture in historical primary sources and then continue that analysis into popular culture of their own lives. Analyses of students’ discussions during each stage of the study provide descriptive statistics and themes to reveal understandings.

Findings

Results imply that children can successfully engage in document analysis and creation of accurate present-day popular culture artifacts and that children in second grade and above were subsequently influenced in their economic understandings about spending and saving money from popular culture analyses. Children in first grade and kindergarten were not successfully able to express these deeper connections, which may be explained by cognitive theory offered for this age range.

Originality/value

This research offers a unique way of combining the analysis of historic and present-day primary sources in order to understand the influences popular culture can have on economic-based behaviors. Novel approaches, which use the C3 framework to engage students in higher-order thinking of social studies disciplines, will help build stronger democratic citizenship competencies in children.

Details

Social Studies Research and Practice, vol. 14 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1933-5415

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Article
Publication date: 4 May 2012

Ingrid Jeacle

The objective of this paper is to recognize the richness in exploring the inter‐linkages between accounting and popular culture. Such an investigation should reap returns…

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3487

Abstract

Purpose

The objective of this paper is to recognize the richness in exploring the inter‐linkages between accounting and popular culture. Such an investigation should reap returns in not only furthering an understanding of accounting, but also the ways and means in which notions of accountability and audit permeate our everyday lives. In addition, it attempts to capture the significant transformative influence of accounting, and calculative practices more generally, in the actual shaping of the contours of the cultural context. Finally, it briefly introduces the six papers in this AAAJ special issue.

Design/methodology/approach

The paper draws on literature from the fields of both accounting and cultural studies to set out a theoretically informed framework for the future examination of the myriad ways in which accounting is entwined with the popular.

Findings

The paper argues a case for the study of accounting within the domain of popular culture, proposes two theoretical lenses from which to examine the inter‐linkages between these two disciplines, and presents a diverse range of research possibilities for further scholarly inquiry in the field.

Originality/value

Traditionally regarded as trivial and unworthy of academic attention, research into the regular rituals that pervade the everyday is now a legitimate field of scholarly inquiry among social and cultural theorists. Accounting researchers, however, have remained relatively aloof from this general trend, preferring to seek solace in the sphere of the corporation rather than the coffee shop. This paper is novel in that it attempts to broaden the scope of accounting scholarship into the new domain of popular culture.

Details

Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, vol. 25 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-3574

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Book part
Publication date: 7 March 2019

Asya Draganova

Abstract

Details

Popular Music in Contemporary Bulgaria: At the Crossroads
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78743-697-8

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Article
Publication date: 3 April 2007

Nora Dimmock

This paper was written to aid academic libraries that may be considering adding collections of popular culture items to their collections. The Multimedia Center at the…

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1373

Abstract

Purpose

This paper was written to aid academic libraries that may be considering adding collections of popular culture items to their collections. The Multimedia Center at the University of Rochester's River Campus Libraries partnered with students to establish a popular DVD collection in 2001. Changes in acquisitions, cataloging, processing, shelving, and access were required. A review of the current literature helps make a compelling story for why these items add value to the libraries' collections and how they contribute to the educational mission of the university.

Design/methodology/approach

Changes that were made to provide improved access to a high circulation collection are discussed. Current literature on popular culture collections in academic libraries, media literacy, and the unique creation of knowledge by the current generation of college students is used to provide a basis for supporting these incongruous collections.

Findings

The generation of students who have grown up with the internet use media for the creation of knowledge. The distinction between scholarly material and popular material may be a library construct and inhibit the creation of new texts.

Practical implications

Academic libraries that are attempting to establish collections of popular culture items such as DVDs can examine the solutions that the Multimedia Center staff used to overcome barriers to access and circulation, including the philosophical barrier imposed by an institutional bias against popular culture items.

Originality/value

This paper is unique in that it not only examines the technical details needed to successfully integrate a high‐circulation, easily browsed DVD collection into an academic library setting, it also examines the reasons why these collections are essential to the educational mission of the modern university.

Details

New Library World, vol. 108 no. 3/4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0307-4803

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 9 July 2013

Maria Lexhagen, Mia Larson and Christine Lundberg

This chapter focuses on the importance of social media for pop culture fans. A web survey for fans of the Twilight Saga is implemented, using the concepts of cognitive…

Abstract

This chapter focuses on the importance of social media for pop culture fans. A web survey for fans of the Twilight Saga is implemented, using the concepts of cognitive, affective, and evaluative social identity and personal, product, and situational involvement. The purpose is to examine to what degree social identity and involvement can explain pop culture fans’ future intention to travel, make recommendations to others, and use social media. Findings show that pop culture fans use social media to a large extent and that these means are important for making decisions about traveling and event participation. Moreover, the chapter shows that involvement dimensions are more important than social identity dimensions to explain future intention to travel, to recommend to others, and to use social media.

Details

Tourism Social Media: Transformations in Identity, Community and Culture
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-78190-213-4

Keywords

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