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Article
Publication date: 22 February 2022

Ishita Roy, Md. Shamsul Arefin and Md. Sahidur Rahman

Based on the social exchange theory, the paper aims to explore the effects of work–life support (WLS) practices on subjective well-being through work engagement and job…

Abstract

Purpose

Based on the social exchange theory, the paper aims to explore the effects of work–life support (WLS) practices on subjective well-being through work engagement and job satisfaction.

Design/methodology/approach

Data of 332 bank employees were collected in three waves and analyzed using AMOS and PROCESS macro.

Findings

The study revealed that WLS practices influenced employees' subjective well-being both directly and indirectly. The study's results further supported the serial mediation of the indirect effect through work engagement and job satisfaction.

Practical implications

Organizational WLS practices are supposed to play an effective role in helping employees increase subjective well-being. Organizations should attach importance to implementing WLS practices to ensure that employees are engaged and satisfied. Furthermore, organizations should undertake and communicate favorable WLS practices to stimulate employees' work and non-work well-being.

Originality/value

The study is the first that examines the impact of WLS practices on employees' subjective well-being. Furthermore, the study offers novel insights regarding the dual mediation effect of work engagement and job satisfaction in the relationship between WLS practices and subjective well-being.

Details

Personnel Review, vol. 52 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0048-3486

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 June 2022

M. Afzalur Rahim, Jaffrey P. Katz, Zhenzhong Ma, Hakan Yılmaz, Hermann Lassleben, Md. Sahidur Rahman, Maria Gabriela Silva, Zainab Bibi, Leslie J. Shaw, Thomas E. Fernandez and Cathy Leung Miu Yee

This field study aims to investigate the interactive relationships of millennial employee’s gender, supervisor’s gender and country culture on the conflict-management strategies…

Abstract

Purpose

This field study aims to investigate the interactive relationships of millennial employee’s gender, supervisor’s gender and country culture on the conflict-management strategies (CMS) in ten countries (USA, China, Turkey, Germany, Bangladesh, Portugal, Pakistan, Italy, Thailand and Hong Kong).

Design/methodology/approach

This exploratory study extends past research by examining the interactive effects of gender × supervisor’s gender × country on the CMS within a single generation of workers, millennials. The Rahim Organizational Conflict Inventory–II, Form A was used to assess the use of the five CMS (integrating, obliging, dominating, avoiding and compromising). Data analysis found CMS used in the workplace are associated with the interaction of worker and supervisor genders and the national context of their work.

Findings

Data analysis (N = 2,801) was performed using the multivariate analysis of covariance with work experience as a covariate. The analysis provided support for the three-way interaction. This interaction suggests how one uses the CMS depends on self-gender, supervisor’s gender and the country where the parties live. Also, the covariate – work experience – was significantly associated with CMS.

Research limitations/implications

One of the limitations of this study is that the authors collected data from a collegiate sample of employed management students in ten countries. There are significant implications for leading global teams and training programs for mid-level millennials.

Practical implications

There are various conflict situations where one conflict strategy may be more appropriate than others. Organizations may have to change their policies for recruiting employees who are more effective in conflict management.

Social implications

Conflict management is not only important for managers but it is also important for all human beings. Individuals handle conflict every day and it would be really good if they could handle it effectively and improve their gains.

Originality/value

To the best of the authors’ knowledge, no study has tested a three-way interaction of variables on CMS. This study has a wealth of information on CMS for global managers.

Details

International Journal of Conflict Management, vol. 33 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1044-4068

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 1 April 2002

M. Afzalur Rahim, Clement Psenicka, Panagiotis Polychroniou, Jing‐Hua Zhao, Chun‐Sheng Yu, Kawai Anita Chan, Kwok Wai Yee Susana, Maria G. Alves, Chang‐Won Lee, Sahidur Ralunan, Shameema Ferdausy and Rene van Wyk

The study investigated the relationships of the five dimensions of emotional intelligence: self‐awareness, self‐regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills of supervisors…

3010

Abstract

The study investigated the relationships of the five dimensions of emotional intelligence: self‐awareness, self‐regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills of supervisors to subordinates' strategies of handling conflict: problem solving and bargaining. Data (N = 1,395) for this study were collected with questionnaires from MBA students in seven countries (U.S., Greece, China, Bangladesh, Hong Kong and Macau, South Africa, and Portugal). Psychometric properties of the measures were tested and improved with exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis and analysis of indicator and internal consistency reliabilities, and the hypotheses were tested with a structural equations model for each country. Results in the U.S. and in the combined sample provided support for the model which suggests that self‐awareness is positively associated with self‐regulation, empathy, and social skills; self regulation is positively associated with empathy and social skills; empathy and social skills are positively associated with motivation; which in turn, is positively associated with problem solving strategy and negatively associated with bargaining strategy. Differences among countries in these relationships are noted and implications for organizations discussed.

Details

The International Journal of Organizational Analysis, vol. 10 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1055-3185

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