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Article
Publication date: 14 January 2022

Nicole R. Fuller, McDowell Porter and Elyria A. Kemp

This study aims to examine the relationship between marginalization, Web presence and firm performance for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to examine the relationship between marginalization, Web presence and firm performance for small- and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs).

Design/methodology/approach

This study relies upon interviews and surveys of managers and/or owners of SMEs. Using confirmatory factor analysis and structural equation modeling, the authors tested an integrated model of the relationship between marginalization, Web presence and firm performance.

Findings

Findings indicate that marginalization enhances the risk perceptions entrepreneurs assign to internet use. This enhanced risk perception then limits the extent to which an entrepreneur responds to online customer feedback, which has implications for the SME’s relationship and reputation management efforts with buyers, ultimately impacting the enterprise’s performance.

Originality/value

This study sheds light on the overlooked phenomena of marginalization and internet avoidance among entrepreneurs. The findings provide insight for entrepreneurs on the deleterious consequences associated with lacking an online presence.

Details

Journal of Research in Marketing and Entrepreneurship, vol. 24 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1471-5201

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 11 February 2021

Elyria Kemp, McDowell Porter III, Nwamaka A. Anaza and Dong-Jun Min

Organizations can benefit significantly from the growing capabilities of the internet. As the Web facilitates purchasing and reduces the costs of marketing, companies can connect…

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Abstract

Purpose

Organizations can benefit significantly from the growing capabilities of the internet. As the Web facilitates purchasing and reduces the costs of marketing, companies can connect with customers through the use of storytelling. This study aims to examine how small businesses leverage the use of storytelling to engage with customers and drive revenue and online reputation management.

Design/methodology/approach

Both qualitative and quantitative insights are offered in two studies. In Study 1, interviews were conducted with business owners to explore the efforts made by their companies to connect and engage with consumers online. Study 2 builds on the findings from Study 1 and uses survey methodology to test a model which outlines how storytelling can foster engagement with customers.

Findings

Results indicate that story content is positively related to emotional content and the personal connection an individual feels toward a firm’s products. Furthermore, user-generated content moderates the relationship between story content creation and personal connections. Findings also demonstrate that personal connection is essential to customer engagement. Ultimately, engagement can lead to revenue generation from social commerce as well as increased reputation management activity.

Originality/value

This research demonstrates how small businesses can use the power of storytelling to immerse and transport audiences in such a way that customer beliefs and attitudes toward the firm are impacted in a favorable way. By telling its brand story well, firms have the power to increase the value of their products.

Article
Publication date: 5 February 2021

Elyria Kemp, My (Myla) Bui and McDowell Porter, III

This research aims to examine the unique emotional distress experienced during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. It explores the role of fear and anxiety, what fueled it and…

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Abstract

Purpose

This research aims to examine the unique emotional distress experienced during the coronavirus (COVID-19) outbreak. It explores the role of fear and anxiety, what fueled it and how fear and anxiety impacted consumption and behaviors of conformity and compliance.

Design/methodology/approach

An exploratory assessment of the emotions and behaviors of individuals during the early part of the coronavirus outbreak (early March 2020) was conducted by sending a questionnaire to a national panel (n = 42). The insight offered from these individuals, in conjunction with prior literature, provided the basis for the development of a conceptual model that was tested using survey methodology (n = 691).

Findings

Both exploratory and empirical research indicate that ruminative thoughts were positively related to feelings of fear and anxiety, whereas trust in leadership was negatively related to fear and anxiety. Feelings of fear and anxiety were also associated with purchasing in large quantities, in compliance with guidelines to slow the spread of the virus and the management of negative feelings through consumption.

Practical implications

Important insight for marketers and public policymakers in how fear and anxiety might be both tempered and mitigated during emergencies is offered.

Originality/value

This research provides new insight into what fuels fear and anxiety during a pandemic and investigates how fear and anxiety impacts consumption and behaviors of conformity and compliance.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 38 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

Keywords

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 19 November 2018

Rodoniki Athanasiadou, Adriana Bankston, McKenzie Carlisle, Caroline A. Niziolek and Gary S. McDowell

Postdocs make up a significant portion of the biomedical workforce. However, data about the postdoctoral position are generally scarce, and no systematic study of the landscape of…

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Abstract

Purpose

Postdocs make up a significant portion of the biomedical workforce. However, data about the postdoctoral position are generally scarce, and no systematic study of the landscape of individual postdoc salaries in the USA has previously been carried out. The purpose of this study was to assess actual salaries for postdocs using data gathered from US public institutions; determine how these salaries may vary with postdoc title, institutional funding and geographic region; and reflect on which institutional and federal policy measures may have the greatest impact on salaries nationally.

Design/methodology/approach

Freedom of Information Act Requests were submitted to US public universities or university systems containing campuses with at least 300 science, engineering and health postdocs, according to the 2015 National Science Foundation’s Survey of Graduate Students and Postdoctorates in Science and Engineering. Salaries and job titles of postdocs as of December 1, 2016, were requested.

Findings

Salaries and job titles for nearly 14,000 postdocs at 52 US institutions around December 1, 2016, were received. Individual postdoc names were also received for approximately 7,000 postdocs, and departmental affiliations were received for 4,000 postdocs. This exploratory study shows evidence of a postdoc gender pay gap, a significant influence of job title on postdoc salary and a complex relationship between salaries and the level of institutional National Institutes of Health/NSF funding.

Originality/value

These results provide insights into the ability of institutions to collate and report out annualized salary data on their postdocs, highlighting difficulties faced in tracking and reporting data on this population by institutional administration. Ultimately, these types of efforts, aimed at increasing transparency regarding the postdoctoral position, may lead to improved support for postdocs at all US institutions and allow greater agency for postdocs making decisions based on financial concerns.

Open Access
Article
Publication date: 2 May 2024

Gabriel Cachón-Rodríguez, Alicia Blanco-González, Camilo Prado-Román and Antonio Fernández-Portillo

Academic literature calls for research on the impact of psychological states derived from mental illness on detrimental consumer behaviour. The purpose of this study is to assess…

Abstract

Purpose

Academic literature calls for research on the impact of psychological states derived from mental illness on detrimental consumer behaviour. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of anxiety on the consumer’s buying processes (compulsive and impulsive) and emotional regulation.

Design/methodology/approach

To carry out the statistical analysis, the data were obtained through an online survey (n = 726) of supermarket consumers. The treatment of the data was using partial least squares structural equation modelling (PLS-SEM).

Findings

The results obtained show that anxiety influences the generation of harmful behaviour, as it has a positive impact on compulsive and impulsive buying. In addition, compulsive and impulsive buying generate higher levels of consumers’ emotional regulation.

Originality/value

This study contributes to the management of anxiety as a priority element to reduce harmful behaviour. Therefore, it provides useful information for marketing managers and professionals in psychological and healthy consumer processes.

研究目的

學術文獻不斷呼籲研究人員和學者去探討來自精神病的心理狀態如何產生有害的消費者行為。本研究擬評定焦慮對消費者購買流程 (強迫性購物和衝動購物) 和情緒調節所產生的影響。

研究設計/方法/理念

為能進行統計分析,研究人員透過超級市場消費者的在線調查 (n = 726) 取得數據,繼而以結構方程 (PLS-SEM) 處理數據。

研究結果

研究結果顯示,焦慮會導致有害行為的產生,這是因為焦慮對強迫性購物和衝動購物均產生積極的影響; 而且,強迫性購物和衝動購物會產生較高水平的消費者情緒調節。

研究的原創性

本研究的貢獻在於把焦慮視為減少有害行為的優先元素而予以管理; 因此,本研究為市場經理以及於心理上的和健康的消費者進程的專業人員提供了有用的資料。

Details

European Journal of Management and Business Economics, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2444-8451

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 7 December 2021

Tiffany Karalis Noel, Monica Lynn Miles and Padmashree Rida

Mentoring postdocs is a shared responsibility and dynamic process that requires a mutual commitment between the faculty mentor and postdoc. The purpose of this study is to…

Abstract

Purpose

Mentoring postdocs is a shared responsibility and dynamic process that requires a mutual commitment between the faculty mentor and postdoc. The purpose of this study is to understand how minoritized science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) postdocs view and engage in mentoring exchanges with their faculty mentors. In the context of this study, minoritized postdocs include women, people of color, and individuals with international status; faculty mentors include postdocs’ Principal Investigators (PIs).

Design/methodology/approach

Three researchers and 31 data sources (i.e., interview transcripts) were used to construct the case. Researchers first deductively and independently coded the data sources using Molm’s (2006) social exchange framework to identify examples of direct, generalized, and productive mentoring exchanges. Researchers then used thematic analysis (Braun and Clarke, 2006) to identify emergent themes among coded examples of direct, generalized, and productive mentoring exchanges.

Findings

Data analyses revealed three emergent themes: (1.1) postdocs valued regular meetings and communication with mentors to clarify responsibilities and role expectations, (1.2) postdocs found more value in their interactions with junior faculty PIs who were flexible and open to innovative ideas, and (1.3) postdocs appreciated conversations about short- and long-term career goals and advice with mentors.

Originality/value

Findings offer implications for faculty and postdocs’ approaches to mentoring relationships, and for approaches to cultivating supportive scholarly communities in STEM higher education. Recommendations include flexibility in research assignments, increased awareness of non-academic careers, and opportunities for informal interactions and intra/interdepartmental community building.

Details

Studies in Graduate and Postdoctoral Education, vol. 13 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2398-4686

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 29 July 2020

Stefano Grando, Fabio Bartolini, Isabelle Bonjean, Gianluca Brunori, Erik Mathijs, Paolo Prosperi and Daniele Vergamini

This chapter opens the second part of the Volume, focusing on the small farms' role and dynamics within the evolving food system. Assessing small farmers' actual and potential…

Abstract

This chapter opens the second part of the Volume, focusing on the small farms' role and dynamics within the evolving food system. Assessing small farmers' actual and potential contribution to the change towards a sustainable food and nutrition security requires a deep understanding of their strategic decision-making processes. These processes take place in a context highly conditioned by internal and external conditions, including the complex relations between farm and household, which are mapped and described. Building on an adaptation of Porter's model (Porter, 1990), the chapter investigates how farmers, given those conditions, define their strategies (in particular their innovation strategies) aimed at economic and financial sustainability through a multidisciplinary analysis of scientific literature. Internal conditions are identified in the light of the Agricultural Household Model (Singh & Subramanian, 1986) which emphasizes how family farming strategies aim at combining business-related objectives, and family welfare. Then, a comprehensive set of external conditions is identified and then grouped within eight categories: ‘Factors’, ‘Demand’, ‘Finance and Risk’, ‘Regulation and Policy’, ‘Technological’, ‘Ecological’, ‘Socio-institutional’ and ‘Socio-demographic’. Similarly, six types of strategies are identified: ‘Agro-industrial competitiveness’, ‘Blurring farm borders’, ‘Rural development’, ‘Risk management’, ‘Political support’ and ‘Coping with farming decline’.

Book part
Publication date: 17 October 2022

Debbie Hopkins and Nihan Akyelken

Freight and logistics are central to everyday life. These sectors depend on a variety of workers, and the types of work have changed rapidly with shifts towards e-commerce and

Abstract

Freight and logistics are central to everyday life. These sectors depend on a variety of workers, and the types of work have changed rapidly with shifts towards e-commerce and changes to urban logistics. Yet a particular form of masculinity dominates imaginaries of the sector, especially freight transport. Such imaginaries rest on ideas of freight drivers requiring (physical) strength, toughness, flexibility, mobility and driving competencies, as well as being unencumbered by caring responsibilities. In the UK, and elsewhere, the freight sector, and particularly driving-related freight jobs, are heavily reliant on male workers. The freight driver shortage crisis in the UK has been referred to as a ‘ticking timebomb’, emerging from a reliance on white male workers, the majority of whom are over the age of 50. A ‘diversifying’ agenda has been the primary response to this crisis, which has largely focussed on increasing the number of female drivers. At the same time, however, little has been done to address issues associated with pay and conditions for freight workers. In this chapter, the authors examine gendered freight work across three themes: changing mobilities of work, ‘flexibilisation’ of freight working practice and automation of freight vehicles.

Details

Women, Work and Transport
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-1-80071-670-4

Keywords

Article
Publication date: 27 May 2014

Kevin Wilson and Diana Woodburn

This paper aims to explore some of the contextual reasons for the failure of key or strategic account management (K/SAM) programmes. It will discuss how organisational context…

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Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to explore some of the contextual reasons for the failure of key or strategic account management (K/SAM) programmes. It will discuss how organisational context impacts the implementation and effective operation of such programmes in business-to-business markets. The paper looks at the issues affecting K/SAM programmes rather than the management of individual relationships.Organisational context shapes the work environment (Rice 2005, Porter and McGloghlin, 2006): it is comprised of those elements that drive behaviour and facilitate or impede management processes (Goodman and Haisley, 2007). The literature prescribes a wide range of contextual elements conducive to K/SAM processes, but is less expansive on the subject of elements that may cause K/SAM programmes to disappoint.

Design/methodology/approach

This work in-progress paper takes an inductive approach to material provided by surveys of K/SAM communities and their discussions in LinkedIn special interest groups or similar forums to develop a model to give structure to the organisational context issues which may be responsible for K/SAM failure.

Findings

From an initial reading of the literature, two broad categories of factors were identified as elements of organizational context: what might be called the formal or “hard” elements supporting K/SAM programmes and the “soft”, more informal and partly cultural elements that “moderate” or “intervene” in implementation. A model is developed to illustrate the linkages between organizational elements in K/SAM.

Research limitations/implications

Although a pilot study, we believe that valuable insights into KAM failure are provided by the study. The next stage will include a co-operative inquiry approach based on this data, in which participants will actively validate and develop the model by exploring it within their organisations.

Practical implications

The paper draws out a number of significant implications for managers.

Originality/value

The existing context within which attempts are made to implement K/SAM have received little attention and often are ignored or remain “unspoken”. This paper addresses those important issues.

Details

Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, vol. 29 no. 5
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0885-8624

Keywords

Book part
Publication date: 15 March 2007

Katy Jenkins

When I began to think about this chapter, and to consider the impact of negotiating boundaries in my recent PhD research, there were a number of pertinent issues which could be…

Abstract

When I began to think about this chapter, and to consider the impact of negotiating boundaries in my recent PhD research, there were a number of pertinent issues which could be understood in terms of ‘boundaries’. This chapter therefore considers the negotiation of multiple boundaries, in both the research process and the outcomes of development research. Using the case study example of research with a group of grassroots women health promoters, I explore the ways that adopting a qualitative feminist methodological approach served to unsettle boundaries within development research and development practice. As a feminist researcher, one of my key preoccupations has been negotiating and making visible issues of power and positionality in the research process, conceptualised here in terms of a series of boundaries. As this is something with which feminist researchers have struggled for over 20 years (see, e.g., Oakley, 1981; Acker, Barry, & Esseveld, 1983), I do not claim to offer any solutions to these issues, but rather this chapter will provide a discussion of how these dynamics and dilemmas were played out in the context of my own fieldwork. England (1994) highlights the importance of reflecting on the position of the researcher, and her role in the research process, as an integral part of producing qualitative research, and Rose (1997) suggests that this reflexivity should lookboth ‘inward’ to the identity of the researcher, and ‘outward’ in her relation to her research and what is described as ‘the wider world’. (Rose, 1997, p. 309)

Details

Negotiating Boundaries and Borders
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1283-2

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