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Article
Publication date: 29 November 2021

Yi-Fen Liu and I-Ling Ling

Weight loss services feature high consumer involvement that is sometimes marked by repetitive failures. These features can affect regret and its associated factors…

Abstract

Purpose

Weight loss services feature high consumer involvement that is sometimes marked by repetitive failures. These features can affect regret and its associated factors differently from the way that discrete failure can. The purpose of this study is to investigate consumer regret over repetitive failures in weight loss services as well as its antecedents (overeating and insufficient exercise), consequences (rumination and reflection) and moderators (failure experiences and required effort). This study also investigates how rumination and reflection affect persistence intention.

Design/methodology/approach

A total of 318 samples were collected through three surveys, one of which contained a scenario, provided to consumers who experienced repetitive failures in weight loss. The proposed relationships were tested using structural equation modeling, dominance analysis and PROCESS modeling.

Findings

The results of this study reveal that overeating contributes to regret more saliently than does insufficient exercise. The effect of regret on rumination (thoughts about continuing to blame oneself and giving up the pursuit of goals) is stronger than on reflection (thoughts about learning from prior failures and willingness to try again), and greater reflection results in higher persistence intention. Moreover, the effect of insufficient exercise on regret and the effect of regret on rumination are augmented with cumulative failure experiences, whereas required effort enhances the impact of regret on reflection.

Originality/value

This study is the first to focus on regret over repetitive failures in weight loss. It advances the literature by clarifying the antecedents and consequences of regret, showing how failure experiences influence the relationships between regret and its associated factors as well as identifying interventions that benefit from regret.

Details

Journal of Services Marketing, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0887-6045

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Article
Publication date: 8 February 2016

Inge van Seggelen - Damen and Karen van Dam

How does self-efficacy affect employee well-being? The purpose of this paper is to increase insight in the underlying process between employee self-efficacy and well-being…

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3754

Abstract

Purpose

How does self-efficacy affect employee well-being? The purpose of this paper is to increase insight in the underlying process between employee self-efficacy and well-being at work (i.e. emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction) by investigating the mediating role of employees’ engagement in reflection and rumination.

Design/methodology/approach

A representative sample of the Dutch working population (n=506) filled out an online questionnaire. Structural equation modeling was used to test the measurement model and research model.

Findings

As predicted, self-efficacy was significantly related to emotional exhaustion and job satisfaction. Rumination mediated the self-efficacy-exhaustion relationship. Reflection did not serve as a mediator; although reflection was predicted by self-efficacy, it was unrelated to exhaustion and job satisfaction.

Research limitations/implications

This cross-sectional study was restricted to self-report measures. Longitudinal research is needed to validate the findings and to further investigate the relationship between reflection and rumination.

Practical implications

Organizations might try to support their employees’ well-being through interventions that strengthen employees’ self-efficacy, and prevent or decrease rumination.

Originality/value

This study increases the understanding of the role of reflection and rumination at work. The findings indicate that self-reflection can have positive as well as negative outcomes.

Details

Journal of Managerial Psychology, vol. 31 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0268-3946

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2019

JungYun (Christine) Hur and SooCheong (Shawn) Jang

This study aims to investigate how consumer forgiveness is formed by examining rumination and distraction by consumers in hotel service failures.

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate how consumer forgiveness is formed by examining rumination and distraction by consumers in hotel service failures.

Design/methodology/approach

Data were collected using a self-administered questionnaire in the USA. A total of 371 usable responses were obtained. Anderson and Gerbing’s two-step approach was used to assess the measurement and structural models.

Findings

This study suggests that rumination and distraction play significant roles in processing consumer forgiveness. Self-focused rumination and distraction increase consumer forgiveness, whereas provocation-focused rumination exacerbates the negative effects of service failure severity on consumer forgiveness. This study also shows that gender differences exist. Men were more likely than women to link self-focused rumination and distraction to their intentions to forgive a service provider.

Practical implications

This study is helpful for hotel managers to understand the mechanisms of consumer forgiveness in service failures and develop effective recovery strategies. Managers should aim to lessen consumers’ provocation-focused rumination while encouraging self-focused rumination and distraction. In addition, because of the differences in the process of consumer forgiveness between men and women, it is critical to differentiate the two groups in designing targeted recovery strategies for service failures.

Originality/value

This study investigates consumer forgiveness as a behavioral outcome following service failures that may help consumers achieve psychological balance and allow service providers a chance to restore the broken relationship. This study adds new information for understanding consumer responses and provides a basis for effective service management strategies.

Details

International Journal of Contemporary Hospitality Management, vol. 31 no. 4
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0959-6119

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Article
Publication date: 11 January 2016

Camille Saintives and Renaud Lunardo

This paper aims to determine how consumers may regulate their guilt through rumination and emotional support and how such regulation affects their consumption. Compelling…

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2231

Abstract

Purpose

This paper aims to determine how consumers may regulate their guilt through rumination and emotional support and how such regulation affects their consumption. Compelling research indicates that consumption may sometimes induce guilt. Social–psychological literature suggests that a potential way for consumers to regulate their consumption-related guilt is to seek emotional support.

Design/methodology/approach

Two studies, which measure (Study 1) and manipulate (Study 2) guilt, investigate how guilt and rumination affect emotional support and subsequent consumption.

Findings

The results show that guilt and rumination interact and prompt individuals to seek emotional support. The valence (positive or negative) of feedback they receive affects and interacts with their guilt to affect their intention to consume the guilt-inducing product again. Shame is shown to mediate the effect of post-feedback guilt on consumption intentions.

Research limitations/implications

The results extend previous research on guilt by emphasizing emotional support seeking as a specific way of coping in response to guilt feelings and shame as an outcome of guilt. Moreover, the present research shows that guilt can affect behavioural intentions, an effect that surprisingly has not been previously identified in literature.

Practical implications

For brands and retailers providing guilt-inducing products, the results suggest that providing emotional support – for instance through reinsurance messages – may have positive effects on consumer emotions and intentions.

Originality/value

Using two different methods, the research findings offer deeper understanding of how guilt is related to cognitions such as rumination, to emotions such as shame and to behavioural intentions.

Details

Journal of Consumer Marketing, vol. 33 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0736-3761

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Article
Publication date: 26 July 2011

My Bui, Anjala S. Krishen and Kenneth Bates

The purpose of this paper is to assess how regret affects consumer satisfaction levels, extent of rumination, and brand‐switching intention. The paper also seeks to…

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6229

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to assess how regret affects consumer satisfaction levels, extent of rumination, and brand‐switching intention. The paper also seeks to examine any mediating effects between regret and rumination that can be found due to consumers' negative emotions.

Design/methodology/approach

A purchase‐decision scenario was presented to 125 undergraduate students. A between‐subjects experimental design was conducted and structural equation modelling was utilized to evaluate the model fit.

Findings

The results indicate that regret decreases consumer satisfaction level and increases brand‐switching intention. Negative emotion was found to demonstrate an indirect effect between regret and extent of rumination. The findings also suggest that negative emotion acts as a partially mediating variable between the effect of satisfaction levels on extent of rumination and the effect of regret on satisfaction levels.

Practical implications

This study emphasizes the importance of post‐purchase consumer satisfaction. Marketers must pay particular attention to both regret and negative emotion toward purchase decisions. By understanding how specific recourse can be taken to mitigate regret, negative emotions, and ruminative thinking, firms can potentially enhance a brand's image and instil brand loyalty.

Originality/value

This research further validates existing research regarding regret and consumption, while introducing the concept of rumination into the marketing literature. Marketers will have a better understanding of how regret, negative emotions, and rumination can play a role in post‐purchase consumption behaviours.

Details

European Journal of Marketing, vol. 45 no. 7/8
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0309-0566

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Article
Publication date: 12 February 2020

Ruhama Goussinsky

The purpose of this study aims to investigate the independent and combined moderating effects of social sharing and rumination on the relationship between customer…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study aims to investigate the independent and combined moderating effects of social sharing and rumination on the relationship between customer aggression and service sabotage.

Design/methodology/approach

Two samples of service providers were recruited: a sample of face-to-face service employees from various organizations (N = 481) and a sample of call center employees (N = 122). Data were collected using self-reported questionnaires and the research hypotheses were tested using hierarchical regression analyses.

Findings

The impact of customer aggression on service sabotage was exacerbated by rumination in Sample 1 and although failing to reach significance (0.08), the same pattern of interaction was observed in Sample 2. The results lend support to the existence of a three-way interaction effect between customer aggression, social sharing and rumination. Specifically, the positive relationship between customer aggression and service sabotage was stronger for employees who reported high levels of both social sharing and rumination compared to employees who reported high levels of social sharing but low levels of rumination.

Practical implications

Implementing stress-management training intended to help service employees avoid using maladaptive coping strategies when confronted with mistreatment can serve to reduce employees’ engagement in retaliatory behaviors directed against customers.

Originality/value

The study’s findings provide one potential explanation for the mixed findings in the literature on social sharing and suggest that sharing of emotions for coping with customer aggression may become a maladaptive strategy for individuals who tend to engage in ruminative thinking whereas it may be a helpful coping choice for individuals who do not.

Details

International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, vol. 12 no. 1
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1756-669X

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Article
Publication date: 4 April 2018

Jon D. Elhai, Mojisola Tiamiyu and Justin Weeks

Previous research has found support for depression and anxiety severity in association with both increased and problematic smartphone use. However, little research has…

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3966

Abstract

Purpose

Previous research has found support for depression and anxiety severity in association with both increased and problematic smartphone use. However, little research has explored transdiagnostic psychopathology constructs as mediators that may account for these relationships. The purpose of this paper is to test rumination as a possible transdiagnostic (cross-sectional) mediator in these relationships.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors recruited 296 college students to complete relevant web survey measures, including the patient health questionnaire-9 (for depression severity), social interaction anxiety scale (for social anxiety severity), ruminative thought styles questionnaire, smartphone addiction scale-short version (to measure levels of problematic smartphone use), and a measure of smartphone use frequency.

Findings

The authors found support for a structural model whereby the severity of depression and social anxiety accounted for variance in rumination, which, in turn, correlated with problematic smartphone use levels. Rumination accounted for relations between both depression and social anxiety severity with levels of problematic use.

Originality/value

The authors discuss the role of rumination as a possible mechanism between anxiety- and depression-related psychopathology levels with problematic smartphone use severity. This study is unique in exploring rumination in the context of problematic smartphone use.

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Article
Publication date: 16 July 2021

Upasna A. Agarwal, James Avey and Keke Wu

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via…

Abstract

Purpose

This study aims to investigate the differential roles of self-esteem and co-rumination in the mediated relationship between abusive supervision and knowledge hiding via psychological safety.

Design/methodology/approach

The study used a three-wave time-lagged design and data were collected from 388 full-time employees in India.

Findings

The results show that psychological safety mediated the impact abusive supervision had on knowledge hiding. Further, this impact was weakened by higher self-esteem as employees with higher self-esteem were less affected by the impact of abusive supervision on psychological safety and knowledge hiding; but this impact was amplified by more co-rumination as employees who co-ruminated more were also more affected by abusive supervision in psychological safety and knowledge hiding.

Research limitations/implications

A cross-sectional design and the use of self-reported questionnaires are a few limitations of this study.

Originality/value

This study took a purposeful deviation from the traditional path of organizational justice to the study of abusive supervision and psychological safety and endeavored an alternate route, one of resource conservation. Further, employees have diverse reasons that heighten or dampen their inclination to hide knowledge from others in the workplace. The study examines co-rumination and self-esteem as possible boundary conditions.

Details

Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. ahead-of-print no. ahead-of-print
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1367-3270

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Article
Publication date: 22 March 2021

Ishfaq Ahmed, Talat Islam, Saima Ahmad and Ahmad Kaleem

The issue of customer mistreatment in food and retail sectors has come under the spotlight during the COVID-19 crisis. The purpose of this paper is to examine the problem…

Abstract

Purpose

The issue of customer mistreatment in food and retail sectors has come under the spotlight during the COVID-19 crisis. The purpose of this paper is to examine the problem in the COVID-19 pandemic context and study its implications for employee counterproductive behavior in the workplace. Specifically, this study aims to investigate the relationship between customer mistreatment and employee counterproductive behavior by considering the mediating role of cognitive rumination and moderating role of servant leadership at coffee cafés that operated during the COVID-19 smart lockdown period.

Design/methodology/approach

Structured questionnaires were distributed to 479 frontline staff working at cafés and coffee shops located in two large cities of Pakistan. The questionnaire data were analyzed by using bootstrapped regression procedures to determine how the investigated variables influenced counterproductive work behavior during the pandemic.

Findings

The findings revealed a positive influence of customer mistreatment on counterproductive work behavior both directly as well as indirectly in the presence of employee rumination as a mediator. Furthermore, the presence of servant leadership at cafés and coffee shops was found to moderate the impact of customer mistreatment during the pandemic.

Originality/value

The study offers a novel insight into the relationships between mistreatment by customers, counterproductive work behavior, employee rumination and servant leadership in the COVID-19 pandemic context, hitherto unexplored.

Details

British Food Journal, vol. 123 no. 11
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0007-070X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 13 November 2017

Dana L. Haggard, Serge P. da Motta Veiga and Melody W. LaPreze

The purpose of this paper is to adopt an approach/avoidance coping framework to examine the relationships of job search co-rumination (i.e. engaging in repeated and…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to adopt an approach/avoidance coping framework to examine the relationships of job search co-rumination (i.e. engaging in repeated and excessive conversations with a friend about job search problems) and job search talk avoidance (i.e. persistently seeking to escape conversations about the job search) on job search intensity and job search procrastination.

Design/methodology/approach

The authors surveyed 196 new labor market entrants (i.e. graduating students) at two points in time during their last semester in college.

Findings

The authors found that job search co-rumination is positively related to job search intensity, while job search talk avoidance is positively related to job search procrastination. Interestingly, though, the expected negative relationships between job search co-rumination and job search procrastination and between job search talk avoidance and job search intensity were not significant.

Practical implications

This study has implications for both job seekers and career counselors. For job seekers, understanding how their communication patterns influence their behaviors (and ultimately their success) can help them to see the benefits of a balanced approach to sharing about their job search. Furthermore, career centers could organize either job search mentoring or peer group programs to help job seekers navigate the intricacies of the job search process.

Originality/value

This study contributes to understanding whether and how talking (or not) with others (i.e. friends and relatives) about one’s job search influences one’s job search behaviors, such as intensity and procrastination.

Details

Career Development International, vol. 22 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1362-0436

Keywords

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