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Article
Publication date: 1 January 2021

Roderick J. Brodie, Kumar Rakesh Ranjan, Martie-louise Verreynne, Yawei Jiang and Josephine Previte

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a crisis for healthcare systems worldwide. There have been significant challenges to managing public and private health care and related…

Abstract

Purpose

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a crisis for healthcare systems worldwide. There have been significant challenges to managing public and private health care and related services systems’ capacity to cope with testing, treatment and containment of the virus. Drawing on the foundational research by Frow et al. (2019), the paper explores how adopting a service ecosystem perspective provides insight into the complexity of healthcare systems during times of extreme stress and uncertainty.

Design/methodology/approach

A healthcare framework based on a review of the service ecosystem literature is developed, and the COVID-19 crisis in Australia provides an illustrative case.

Findings

The study demonstrates how the service ecosystem perspective provides new insight into the dynamics and multilayered nature of a healthcare system during a pandemic. Three propositions are developed that offer directions for future research and managerial applications.

Practical implications

The research provides an understanding of the relevance of managerial flexibility, innovation, learning and knowledge sharing, which offers opportunities leading to greater resilience in the healthcare system. In particular, the research addresses how service providers in the service ecosystem learn from this pandemic to inform future practices.

Originality/value

The service ecosystem perspective for health care offers fresh thinking and an understanding of how a shared worldview, institutional practices and supportive and disruptive factors influence the systems’ overall well-being during a crisis such as COVID-19.

Details

Journal of Service Theory and Practice, vol. 31 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 2055-6225

Keywords

Abstract

Details

International Journal of Entrepreneurial Behavior & Research, vol. 24 no. 7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 1355-2554

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Article
Publication date: 30 June 2020

Lesego Makhafola and Martie J. Van Deventer

The purpose of this study was to understand what role undergraduate third- and fourth-year students expect librarians to play in an online learning environment and to…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this study was to understand what role undergraduate third- and fourth-year students expect librarians to play in an online learning environment and to determine what information products, training and other services the students expected librarians to embed.

Design/methodology/approach

This case study used a convergent parallel mixed methods design. Data were collected from both students and lecturers. An online questionnaire was used to collect mainly quantitative data from the undergraduates while a semi-structured interview schedule was used for in-depth discussions with lecturers.

Findings

Contrary to what was expected, engineering students regarded access to an embedded librarian as important. Lecturers prefer that a separate, mandatory module is created and embedded in the learning environment. Product and service expectations were not surprising, but there are gaps to fill when it comes to training needs.

Research limitations/implications

The research sample was small and therefore generalizations are not advisable.

Originality/value

The research holds value to stakeholders involved in the teaching and learning of engineering subjects. Librarians embarking on the process of embedding their services online should also find the results useful.

Details

Library Management, vol. 41 no. 6/7
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-5124

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 10 April 2017

Morgan P. Miles, Martie-Louise Verreynne, Andrew McAuley and Kevin Hammond

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while…

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to explore how universities attempt to balance meeting their traditional mission of education, research and community engagement while remaining economically sustainable.

Design/methodology/approach

A survey was conducted in 2014 of university executives and found that universities in Australia are rapidly transitioning from public supported institutions to an organizational form much more like social enterprise, with all of the organizational, marketing and ethical ramifications.

Findings

Australian universities were found to be focused on maintaining financial viability and that the most significant source of future revenue for Australian universities is perceived to be from international students.

Originality/value

The findings have tremendous public policy and ethical implications – suggesting a shift in the classification of university education from what was generally considered a public good to what is increasingly perceived as a private good in the contemporary market place, with the increasing importance of international students.

Details

International Journal of Educational Management, vol. 31 no. 3
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0951-354X

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 February 1997

Pieter A. van Brakel and Martie Pienaar

Geographic information systems (GIS) are increasingly being used for effective accessibility to spatial data. A GIS comprises much more than the mere storage of data…

Abstract

Geographic information systems (GIS) are increasingly being used for effective accessibility to spatial data. A GIS comprises much more than the mere storage of data: spatial data of the earth is being manipulated to create new information, perform complex spatial analyses, and generate maps and reports. An automated GIS system consists of an integrated digital database containing information about geographic features (points, lines and areas); the hardware, software and people used in the analysis of the features (geographic coordinate data); and a description of features (attribute data). It also provides the ability to query, manipulate and analyse the data. However, certain problems exist in the way access is gained to geographic data. Currently geographic data sets (e.g. maps) are scattered across South Africa and the world, with no standardised method of accessing them. Data needed by a specific GIS system must be ‘ordered’ or downloaded from a remote site. No centralised index to existing geographic data exists. The results from a specific GIS analysis are not necessarily directly available to others. When downloading and thus duplicating a set of complex data from an external site, with the purpose of further manipulation, the copy gradually becomes less current when compared to the original data set. In this paper it is argued that most of these problems can be addressed effectively by making GIS data and information available via the Internet's World Wide Web. By creating hypertext links between different GIS sites, data sets could be shared between sites: a type of online atlas system with a task‐oriented user interface geared towards map creation and fact extraction could be developed. A number of experimental interfaces between GIS application software and the Web have already been developed: these and other approaches are discussed.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 15 no. 2
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

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Article
Publication date: 3 September 2019

Upamali Amarakoon, Jay Weerawardena, Martie-Louise Verreynne and Julian Teicher

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise and validate a scale to capture entrepreneurship behaviour at the human resource management (HRM) functional level.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to conceptualise and validate a scale to capture entrepreneurship behaviour at the human resource management (HRM) functional level.

Design/methodology/approach

Drawing from the HRM and entrepreneurship literature, this paper first conceptualises and operationalises entrepreneurial behaviour at the human resource (HR) functional level. Second, it uses a multi-phase, systematic scale development procedure to design a two-dimensional scale of entrepreneurial HRM. Finally, the scale is validated by testing its relationship with HRM innovation.

Findings

The findings suggest that entrepreneurial behaviour at the HRM functional level is characterised by innovativeness, pro-activeness, risk-taking and consensus-building behaviour. The scale shed new light on the roles of HR professionals.

Research limitations/implications

This paper highlights the need for HR professionals to demonstrate entrepreneurial behaviour in HRM value addition. The scale development process, while providing a detailed understanding of the entrepreneurial behaviour at the HR functional level, will facilitate future research.

Practical implications

This scale provides HR professionals with the means to measure and improve entrepreneurial HRM, leading to higher levels of HRM-based value addition.

Originality/value

This is the first known attempt to capture entrepreneurial behaviour at the HRM functional level.

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Article
Publication date: 5 September 2016

Bernard McKenna, Martie-Louise Verreynne and Neal Waddell

Unequal workplace gender outcomes continue to motivate research. Using the prism of work-life-(im)balance, the purpose of this paper is to show how identity salience and…

Abstract

Purpose

Unequal workplace gender outcomes continue to motivate research. Using the prism of work-life-(im)balance, the purpose of this paper is to show how identity salience and motivation contribute to a subject position that for many reproduces socially gendered practices of workplaces.

Design/methodology/approach

After initial inductive computer-assisted text analysis, the authors innovatively move to deductively analyse data from focus group and semi-structured interviews of 18 female and 19 male Australian managers in the financial and government sectors.

Findings

The authors find that a gendered sense of reflexivity is virtually non-existent among the female Australian managers and professionals interviewed in this research. The inductive stage of critical discourse analysis revealed a substantial difference between men and women in two concepts, responsibility, and choice. These form the axes of the typological model to better explain how non-reflexive gendered workplace practices are “performed”.

Practical implications

This empirical research provides a foundation for understanding the role of choice and responsibility in work-home patterns for women.

Social implications

The absence of a reflexive gender-based understanding of women’s work-home choice is explained in Bourdieusian terms.

Originality/value

By not specifically using a gender lens, the authors have avoided the stereotypical understanding of gendered workplaces.

Details

International Journal of Manpower, vol. 37 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0143-7720

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 December 1999

Martie Pienaar and Pieter van Brakel

Users of geographic information systems (GIS) often need immediate access to current data and information for proper analysis of GIS data. In the past, datasets were…

Abstract

Users of geographic information systems (GIS) often need immediate access to current data and information for proper analysis of GIS data. In the past, datasets were captured by an organisation to serve specific purposes and were mainly used by specialists within that organisation. The capturing of datasets represents substantial investments for each organisation to maintain specialised GIS databases, and results in exorbitant levels of duplication. The high cost involved in data capturing and the lack of efficient access to existing digital data stress the importance of finding alternatives to enhance GIS data sharing on a national scale. Although this need for data sharing exists, some issues limit the ability to share. However, the advent of the World Wide Web (WWW) provides a breakthrough alternative to data sharing. This paper outlines the limitations of traditional data sharing techniques and proposes a solution to data sharing via the web.

Details

The Electronic Library, vol. 17 no. 6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0264-0473

Keywords

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Article
Publication date: 1 May 2006

Belinda Luke and Martie‐Louise Verreynne

The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of government in fostering entrepreneurial activity and economic development, thereby balancing social and economic objectives.

Abstract

Purpose

The purpose of this paper is to consider the role of government in fostering entrepreneurial activity and economic development, thereby balancing social and economic objectives.

Design/methodology/approach

Case studies on state‐owned enterprises (SOEs) in New Zealand, one of which is examined in detail, are analysed and compared. Triangulated data from interviews, texts, and personal observation were collected and analysed in two separate phases, examining effective pathways for social enterprise in the public sector and related themes.

Findings

Findings suggest the role of government is not limited to policy‐making. Examination of activity which aims to balance social and economic objectives identifies several factors which have contributed to successful and entrepreneurial operations within SOEs.

Research limitations/implications

Although limited to a single case, this paper reveals the nature and importance of entrepreneurial activity within government organisations.

Practical implications

Deregulation as an alternative to privatisation is examined and evaluated.

Originality/value

Evidence is provided to support entrepreneurship within the public sector as a strong foundation for balancing both social and economic objectives.

Details

International Journal of Social Economics, vol. 33 no. 5/6
Type: Research Article
ISSN: 0306-8293

Keywords

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Book part
Publication date: 14 September 2007

Martie-Louise Verreynne and Denny Meyer

Intrapreneurs are those employees who identify and pursue opportunities in a firm. By pursuing these opportunities with new products, services or processes…

Abstract

Intrapreneurs are those employees who identify and pursue opportunities in a firm. By pursuing these opportunities with new products, services or processes, intrapreneurial employees may influence the strategic direction of the firm, a process called intrapreneurial strategy-making. Little consideration has been given to how small firms may use this process to improve performance. To this end this paper describes the results of an empirical study conducted with 454 small firms. Analysis of the data indicates that intrapreneurial strategy-making has a significant positive relationship with firm performance, depending on the size of the firm, its organizational structure and the dynamism of the environment. It further shows that differentiation strategies may mediate this relationship.

Details

Entrepreneurial Strategic Processes
Type: Book
ISBN: 978-0-7623-1429-4

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